Products>Mobile Ed: NT346 Exegetical Study: Paul's Letter to the Philippians (audio)

Mobile Ed: NT346 Exegetical Study: Paul's Letter to the Philippians (audio)

Format: Digital
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Overview

This course applies the concepts from LA211 to an exposition of Philippians. Dr. Runge takes you through the Greek text, explaining the exegetical significance of the devices and how he arrived at his conclusions. You’ll learn discourse analysis methods and how to apply them.

"I’m going to help you see what grammatical markers and rhetorical devices [and] literary devices that Paul has used to structure the letter, to draw attention to certain points, to organize the letter, and again, to help draw the reader into the letter to really hear Paul’s heart for this church."

Dr. Runge, as always, brings his engaging examples, illustrations, and humor to illustrate his points. By analyzing jokes, mistranslated signs, and other things from everyday life, your learning will become more effective and enjoyable.

This is the audio only version of NT346 Exegetical Study: Paul’s Letter to the Philippians. To purchase the full course, click here.

Course Outline

Introduction

  • Introducing the Speaker and Course
  • Course Method
  • Exploring the Greek New Testament Discourse Bundle

Unit 1: Philippians 1:1–11

  • Greeting (Phil 1:1–2)
  • Thanksgiving (Phil 1:3–7)
  • Philippians 1:3–5
  • Finding Clusters of “All” in Philippians
  • Philippians 1:6–7
  • Philippians 1:7b
  • Philippians 1:1–7 HDNT
  • Philippians 1:8
  • Using the Propositional Outlines Visual Filter with the LDGNT
  • Philippians 1:9–11
  • Philippians 1:8–11 HDNT
  • Homiletical Summary (Phil 1:1–11)

Unit 2: Philippians 1:12–20

  • Philippians 1:12
  • Studying the Meta-Comments in the LDGNT and HDNT
  • Philippians 1:12–14
  • Philippians 1:12–14 HDNT
  • Philippians 1:15–17
  • Philippians 1:15–17 HDNT
  • Philippians 1:18
  • Philippians 1:19–20
  • Philippians 1:18–20 HDNT
  • Homiletical Summary (Phil 1:12–20)

Unit 3: Philippians 1:21–30

  • Philippians 1:21–26
  • Philippians 1:21–26 HDNT
  • Philippians 1:27–30
  • Using the Passage Analysis Tool
  • Philippians 1:27–30 HDNT
  • Homiletical Summary (Phil 1:27–30)

Unit 4: Philippians 2:1–18

  • Overview (Phil 2:1–18)
  • Philippians 2:1–4
  • Using the Exegetical Guide to Study Greek Words Carefully
  • Philippians 2:5
  • Philippians 2:6–11
  • Philippians 2:12–13
  • Philippians 2:14–18
  • Summary (Phil 2:12–18)
  • Philippians 2:1–4 HDNT
  • Philippians 2:5–11 HDNT
  • Philippians 2:12–18 HDNT
  • Homiletical Summary (Phil 2:1–18)

Unit 5: Philippians 2:19–30

  • Overview (Phil 2:19–30)
  • Philippians 2:19–24
  • Philippians 2:25–30
  • Philippians 2:19–24 HDNT
  • Philippians 2:25–30 HDNT
  • Researching Epaphroditus Using the Factbook
  • Homiletical Summary (Phil 2:19–30)

Unit 6: Philippians 3:1–14

  • Overview (Phil 3:1–14)
  • Philippians 3:1
  • Philippians 3:2–4
  • Philippians 3:4b–8
  • Philippians 3:8b–11
  • Highlighting the Connectives
  • Philippians 3:1–4 HDNT
  • Philippians 3:4–11 HDNT
  • Homiletical Summary (Phil 3:1–11)
  • Philippians 3:12–14
  • Philippians 3:12–14 HDNT
  • Homiletical Summary (Phil 3:12–14)

Unit 7: Philippians 3:15–21

  • Overview (Phil 3:15–21)
  • Philippians 3:15–17
  • Philippians 3:18–21
  • Philippians 3:15–17 HDNT
  • Searching for “Principle” Statements in Philippians
  • Philippians 3:18–21 HDNT
  • Homiletical Summary (Phil 3:15–21)

Unit 8: Philippians 4:1–9

  • Overview (Phil 4:1–9)
  • Philippians 4:2–7
  • Philippians 4:8–9
  • Philippians 4:1–9 HDNT
  • Homiletical Summary (Phil 4:1–9)

Unit 9: Philippians 4:10–23

  • Overview (Phil 4:10–20)
  • Philippians 4:10–14
  • Philippians 4:15–20
  • Philippians 4:10–20 HDNT
  • Comparing and Contrasting Two Similar Words
  • Homiletical Summary (Phil 4:10–20)
  • Conclusion to Philippians (Phil 4:21–23)

Product Details

About Steven E. Runge

Dr. Steven E. Runge serves as a scholar-in-residence at Faithlife and as a research associate in the Department of Ancient Studies at the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa. He has a doctor of literature degree in biblical languages from the University of Stellenbosch. In preparation for his doctoral research, Dr. Runge completed several years of study in the linguistic fields of pragmatics and discourse grammar.

Dr. Runge has served as a visiting professor teaching Greek discourse grammar at Knox Theological Seminary; Dallas Theological Seminary; Wycliffe Hall, Oxford; Wales Evangelical School of Theology; and Southern Seminary. He also served as an adjunct faculty member at Northwest Baptist Theological College, Trinity Western University, and Associated Canadian Theological Schools (ACTS) while completing his education. He is also very active in the church. He and his wife have two daughters and live in Bellingham, WA.