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Word Biblical Commentary: New Testament | WBC (25 vols.)

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Overview

The Word Biblical Commentary delivers the best in biblical scholarship, from the leading scholars of our day who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation. This series emphasizes a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence. The result is judicious and balanced insight into the meanings of the text in the framework of biblical theology. These widely acclaimed commentaries serve as exceptional resources for the professional theologian and instructor, the seminary or university student, the working minister, and everyone concerned with building theological understanding from a solid base of biblical scholarship.

  • Incorporates Greek and Hebrew resources for in-depth research
  • Contains author translations
  • Includes Greek and Hebrew text throughout; Hebrew also transliterated

This collection contains 25 volumes of material. With Logos, you can use these volumes more efficiently for research and sermon preparation. Every word from every book has been indexed and catalogued to help you search the entire Word Biblical Commentary for a particular verse or topic. With Logos, the WBC will integrate into the Passage Guide. Whenever you enter your passage and click go, results from the WBC will appear on the text you’re studying. This gives you instant access to exactly what you’re looking for in less time than it would take you to walk over to the bookshelf and begin flipping through a print volume.

Volume 33a: Matthew 1–13

  • Author: Donald A. Hagner
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1993
  • Pages: 504

One of the most detailed and thorough treatments of Matthew ever written, Donald Hagner’s commentary addresses the relationship of Matthew to Luke and Mark, examines the major issues for interpreting Matthew, and provides an fresh translation based on engagement with the book’s textual history. Focusing on interpretation and message of Jesus’ kingdom, Hagner draws out illuminating theological themes, applying them to contemporary life.

Donald A. Hagner is the George Eldon Ladd Emeritus Professor of New Testament and the senior professor of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary. He is the author of Encountering the Book of Hebrews, The Jewish Reclamation of Jesus, and The New Testament: A Historical and Theological Introduction. Hagner is the coeditor of the New International Greek Testament Commentary with I. Howard Marshall and an ordained minister in the American Presbyterian Church.

Volume 33b: Matthew 14–28

  • Author: Donald A. Hagner
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1995
  • Pages: 576

One of the most detailed and thorough treatments of Matthew ever written, Donald Hagner’s commentary addresses the relationship of Matthew to Luke and Mark, examines the major issues for interpreting Matthew, and provides an fresh translation based on engagement with the book’s textual history. Focusing on interpretation and message of Jesus’ kingdom, Hagner draws out illuminating theological themes, applying them to contemporary life.

Donald A. Hagner is the George Eldon Ladd Emeritus Professor of New Testament and the senior professor of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary. He is the author of Encountering the Book of Hebrews, The Jewish Reclamation of Jesus, and The New Testament: A Historical and Theological Introduction. Hagner is the coeditor of the New International Greek Testament Commentary with I. Howard Marshall and an ordained minister in the American Presbyterian Church.

Volume 34a: Mark 1–8:26

  • Author: Robert A. Guelich
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1989
  • Pages: 454

Thoroughly engaging with the massive body of scholarship on Mark, Robert Guelich’s commentary presents a thorough textual, historical, and theological examination of Mark. He addresses “the synoptic problem” and provides an engaging and stimulating exposition on the church’s second gospel.

Robert A. Guelich (1939–1991) was professor of New Testament Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary. He is the author of The Sermon on the Mount: A Foundation for Understanding.

Volume 34b: Mark 8:27–16:20

  • Author: Craig A. Evans
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 594

Thoroughly engaging with the massive body of scholarship on Mark, Craig Evans’s commentary presents a thorough textual, historical, and theological examination of Mark. He addresses “the synoptic problem” and provides an engaging and stimulating exposition on the church’s second gospel.

Dr. Craig A. Evans received his PhD in New Testament from Claremont Graduate University and his DHabil from the Karoli Gaspar Reformed University in Budapest. He is the John Bisagno Distinguished Professor of Christian Origins at Houston Baptist University in Texas.

Evans taught at Trinity Western University in British Columbia for 21 years, where he directed the graduate program in biblical studies and founded the Dead Sea Scrolls Institute. He has recently served on the advisory board for the Gospel of Judas for National Geographic Society and has appeared frequently as an expert commentator on network television programs.

Evans has written and edited extensively on the historical Jesus and the Jewish background of the New Testament era. His published works include From Prophecy to Testament, Jesus and the Ossuaries, Jesus: The Final Days, and Dictionary of New Testament Background.

Volume 35a: Luke 1:1–9:20

  • Author: John Nolland
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1989
  • Pages: 520

Explore the rich narrative of Luke’s gospel with leading New Testament scholar John Nolland. Examining the historical context, literary structure, and relationship to other gospels, Nolland provides a detailed reading of Luke that emphasizes the historicity of the book and its theological meaning.

John Nolland is academic dean and lecturer in New Testament studies at Trinity College, Bristol, England. He is an ordained minister of the Church of England, and author of The New International Greek Testament Commentary: The Gospel of Matthew and coauthor of Built upon the Rock: Studies in the Gospel of Matthew.

Volume 35b: Luke 9:21–18:34

  • Author: John Nolland
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1993
  • Pages: 510

Explore the rich narrative of Luke’s gospel with leading New Testament scholar John Nolland. Examining the historical context, literary structure, and relationship to other gospels, Nolland provides a detailed reading of Luke that emphasizes the historicity of the book and its theological meaning.

John Nolland is academic dean and lecturer in New Testament studies at Trinity College, Bristol, England. He is an ordained minister of the Church of England, and author of The New International Greek Testament Commentary: The Gospel of Matthew and coauthor of Built upon the Rock: Studies in the Gospel of Matthew.

Volume 35c: Luke 18:35–24:53

  • Author: John Nolland
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1993
  • Pages: 462

Explore the rich narrative of Luke’s gospel with leading New Testament scholar John Nolland. Examining the historical context, literary structure, and relationship to other gospels, Nolland provides a detailed reading of Luke that emphasizes the historicity of the book and its theological meaning.

John Nolland is academic dean and lecturer in New Testament studies at Trinity College, Bristol, England. He is an ordained minister of the Church of England, and author of The New International Greek Testament Commentary: The Gospel of Matthew and coauthor of Built upon the Rock: Studies in the Gospel of Matthew.

Volume 36: John, 2nd ed.

  • Author: George R. Beasley-Murray
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 588

Confront the historical, theological, and textual concerns raised by the fourth gospel. George Beasley-Murray reveals John’s unique presentation of Christ as truly human and fully divine, giving special emphasis to John’s concentration on the passion and victory of the incarnate Word. His commentary illuminates John’s primary themes—the cross and resurrection—while engaging thoughtfully with contemporary research.

George R. Beasley-Murray was principal of Spurgeon’s College in England and James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is the author of Baptism in the New Testament, Jesus and the Kingdom of God, and Gospel of Life: Theology in the Fourth Gospel. Beasley-Murray’s son, Paul Beasley-Murray, wrote a biography about his father called Fearless for Truth: A Personal Portrait of George Raymond Beasley-Murray.

Volume 38a: Romans 1–8

  • Author: James D.G. Dunn
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 513

See Romans in the light of modern historical and cultural studies with this commentary from ground breaking scholar James D.G. Dunn. Dunn maintains that it is imperative to grasp the coherence of Paul’s thought as it moves with sustained logic and consistent rigor from the opening announcement of God’s righteousness revealed in Christ and the gospel through each interlocking section of this epistle. He insists that the letter must be read and understood within a specific historical and cultural context. Paul’s background in Judaism, his perception of the role of the law as a marker of national Jewish identity, God’s saving actions in Christ both in continuity with the past and as a decisive new chapter in salvation and world history, and the ongoing eschatological tension between the “already” and the “not yet”–clues that inform a penetrating and moving piece of commentary writing.

James D.G. Dunn is Emeritus Lightfoot Professor of Divinity at the University of Durham and is a leading British New Testament scholar. Dunn is a significant proponent of the New Perspective on Paul, and became only the third British scholar to be made the president of the Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas. He is the author of numerous books, including Did the First Christians Worship Jesus? The New Testament Evidence, The Epistles to Colossians and Philemon: New International Greek Testament Commentary, Jesus, Paul, and the Gospels, and The Oral Gospel Tradition.

Volume 38b: Romans 9–16

  • Author: James D.G. Dunn
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 459

See Romans in the light of modern historical and cultural studies with this commentary from ground breaking scholar James D.G. Dunn. Dunn maintains that it is imperative to grasp the coherence of Paul’s thought as it moves with sustained logic and consistent rigor from the opening announcement of God’s righteousness revealed in Christ and the gospel through each interlocking section of this epistle. He insists that the letter must be read and understood within a specific historical and cultural context. Paul’s background in Judaism, his perception of the role of the law as a marker of national Jewish identity, God’s saving actions in Christ both in continuity with the past and as a decisive new chapter in salvation and world history, and the ongoing eschatological tension between the “already” and the “not yet”–clues that inform a penetrating and moving piece of commentary writing.

James D.G. Dunn is Emeritus Lightfoot Professor of Divinity at the University of Durham and is a leading British New Testament scholar. Dunn is a significant proponent of the New Perspective on Paul, and became only the third British scholar to be made the president of the Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas. He is the author of numerous books, including Did the First Christians Worship Jesus? The New Testament Evidence, The Epistles to Colossians and Philemon: New International Greek Testament Commentary, Jesus, Paul, and the Gospels, and The Oral Gospel Tradition.

Volume 40: 2 Corinthians, 2nd ed.

  • Author: Ralph P. Martin
  • Editor: Lynn Allan Losie
  • Edition: Second
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Zondervan
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 752

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Ralph P. Martin gives insight into the unique problems expressed in the ancient, hedonistic, cosmopolitan setting of Corinth. He shows how Paul’s attempt to clearly distinguish the gospel from Hellenistic Judaism and Hellenistic Jewish Christian ideology results in a moving statement of the Christian message. Rather than the “theology of glory” prevalent in Corinth, Paul articulates his theology of the cross as a “theology of weakness,” of servanthood and ministry. What was at stake at Corinth, says Dr. Martin, was “nothing less than the essence of the kerygma as expressed in the way of the cross . . . for proclamation and daily living.” This edition includes new sections on the “collection” and Paul’s rhetoric, issues of composition and social setting, and topics such as the Spirit, the opponents, Paul’s theology, and the Resurrection.

Ralph P. Martin (1925–2013) served as scholar-in-residence at several schools, including Fuller Theological Seminary, Haggard School of Theology, and Azusa Pacific University. He was a professor emeritus of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary and an associate professor in biblical studies at the University of Sheffield in England. He is the author of Word Biblical Commentary, Volume 43: Philippians (Revised Edition), Worship in the Early Church, and Word Biblical Commentary, Volume 40: 2 Corinthians.

Lynn Allan Losie is associate professor of New Testament at Azusa Pacific Seminary.

Volume 41: Galatians

  • Author: Richard N. Longenecker
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1990
  • Pages: 444

One of the most influential volumes on Galatians, Richard Longenecker offers a fresh translation of Galatians and gives the reader a thorough discussion of such matters as authorship, date, and textual problems, while also addressing the problems Paul faced within his Galatian churches. Longenecker reviews the message of Paul’s opponents and the impact of Paul’s thought on Christianity.

Volume 42: Ephesians

  • Author: Andrew T. Lincoln
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1990
  • Pages: 592

Focus on the power of Paul’s persuasive rhetoric and message in this commentary from Andrew T. Lincoln. Situating the epistle in its historical context, evaluating competing claims of authorship, and examining textual history of the book, Lincoln offers a fresh reading of this challenging epistle that expresses Paul’s vision for ecclesiastical and domestic life.

Andrew T. Lincoln is the Portland Professor of New Testament at the University of Gloucestershire. He is the author of Black’s New Testament Commentary: The Gospel According to Saint John.

Volume 43: Philippians, rev. ed.

  • Author: Gerald F. Hawthorne
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 384

Engage Philippians through the fresh literary perspective of rhetorical criticism, and gain insights from recent archaeological discoveries, and a consideration of the “effective” history of the letter through its influence on the church. Gerald Hawthorne reassesses the issues of provenance and identity of Paul’s opponents and places special emphasis on the themes of joy in suffering and life in Christ are fleshed out in great detail.

Gerald F. Hawthorne (1925–2010) served as a professor of Greek for 42 years at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois, as well as chairperson of the Institute for Biblical Research, which he founded. He coedited The Dictionary of Paul and His Letters.

Volume 45: 1 & 2 Thessalonians

  • Author: F.F. Bruce
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1982
  • Pages: 228

Detailed exegesis defines any commentary written by F.F. Bruce. Here, Bruce’s efforts provide detailed analysis of the Thessalonian context, the spread of the gospel in Macedonia, and a review of the textual transmission of these early New Testament books. Bruce explains why the Christian message caused a riot at Thessalonica, and traces the church’s anxieties over the return of Christ, clarifying Paul’s cautious response to speculation in Thessalonica and a discussion of how to deal with persecution.

F. F. Bruce (1910-1990) was Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester in England. During his distinguished career, he wrote many bestselling commentaries and books, including The Canon of Scripture, Paul: Apostle of the Free Spirit, and The Epistle to the Galatians: New International Greek Testament Commentary. He also served as general editor of The New International Commentary on the New Testament.

Volume 46: Pastoral Epistles

  • Author: William D. Mounce
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Pages: 786

Engage some of the hottest issues in contemporary society with this exhaustive treatment of 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and Titus. Defending traditional interpretations on multiple issues, William Mounce provides an intense examination of the text and presents multiple excursus on topics such as qualifications for leadership and authorship.

William D. Mounce is the president of Biblical Training, a nonprofit organization offering the finest in evangelical teaching to the world for free. He served at a church in Spokane, Washington, and was a professor of New Testament and director of the Greek program at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. He is the author of the bestselling Basics of Biblical Greek, Mounce’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words, and Morphology of Biblical Greek.

Volume 47a: Hebrews 1–8

  • Author: William L. Lane
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 372

Winner of Christianity Today’s 1993 Critic’s Choice Award, this commentary provides an interpretation of the book of Hebrews in conversation with the rapidly growing body of scholarly literature. Acknowledging that many issues such as authorship and provenance remain open, William Lane examines the evidence available and makes a compelling case for his reading of the book and its historical background.

William L. Lane (1931–1999) was Paul T. Walls Chair in Wesleyan and Biblical Studies at Seattle Pacific University. He served as a translation team for the NASB and NIV translations of the Bible. He is the author of The New International Commentary on the New Testament: The Gospel of Mark.

Volume 47b: Hebrews 9–13

  • Author: William L. Lane
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 450

Winner of Christianity Today’s 1993 Critic’s Choice Award, this commentary provides an interpretation of the book of Hebrews in conversation with the rapidly growing body of scholarly literature. Acknowledging that many issues such as authorship and provenance remain open, William Lane examines the evidence available and makes a compelling case for his reading of the book and its historical background.

William L. Lane (1931–1999) was Paul T. Walls Chair in Wesleyan and Biblical Studies at Seattle Pacific University. He served as a translation team for the NASB and NIV translations of the Bible. He is the author of The New International Commentary on the New Testament: The Gospel of Mark.

Volume 48: James

  • Author: Ralph P. Martin
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 354

One of the most challenging New Testament books, James presents many historical, theological, and textual problems. Ralph Martin tackles each one in order and with scholarly precision. He provides detailed textual notes, places the epistle historically, and engages the theological controversies raised by this often maligned epistle.

Ralph P. Martin was a New Testament professor at the University of Manchester and Fuller Theological Seminary. He is the author of Worship in the Early Church, Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching Ephesians, Colossians, & Philemon, and coedited Dictionary of Paul and His Letters.

Volume 49: 1 Peter

  • Author: J. Ramsey Michaels
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 420

Presenting some of the most unique problems in the New Testament, 1 Peter requires a vast knowledge of the classical world and the New Testament documents. J. Ramsey Michaels’ work on 1 Peter provides a tour through all of the relevant historical data, examining the circumstance which gave rise to Peter’s exhortations. He provides analysis of textual problems, and draws out the epistle’s implications of the epistle for contemporary life.

J. Ramsey Michaels is professor emeritus of religious studies at Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri, and adjunct professor of New Testament at Bangor Theological Seminary, Portland, Maine. He also taught at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. He is the author of several commentaries, on Revelation, including The New International Commentary on the New Testament: The Gospel of John, The IVP New Testament Commentary Series: Revelation, and Interpreting the Book of Revelation.

Volume 50: Jude, 2 Peter

  • Author: Richard Bauckham
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1983
  • Pages: 377

One of the earliest works of ground breaking scholar Richard Bauckham, this commentary provides a detailed examination of the socio-historical context with a special emphasis on the political state of the ancient world at the end of the first century. Bauckham reviews textual data, and draws out insight and applications for contemporary life.

Richard Bauckham was professor of New Testament studies at St Mary’s College, University of St Andrews. He retired in 2007 from this position in order to concentrate on research and writing. He currently is the senior scholar at Ridley Hall in Cambridge and visiting professor at St. Mellitus College. He is the author of Scripture, Tradition and Reason: A Study in the Criteria of Christian Doctrine, Jude and the Relatives of Jesus in the Early Church, and Jesus and the Eyewitnesses: The Gospels as Eyewitness Testimony.

Volume 51: 1, 2, 3 John

  • Author: Stephen S. Smalley
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 350

Stephen Smalley’s exhaustive commentary on the Greek text of the letters of John argues that these epistles, together with the fourth Gospel, record and reflect the spiritual history of the Johannine community itself. These letters contain theological, ethical and practical truths that are fundamental to the Christian position in every age: that Jesus is one with God as well as one with us; that love and righteousness are indispensable to the believer who seeks as a child of God to walk in the light; and that unity, however flexible, is a demand laid upon the whole Church at all times.

Stephen S. Smalley is a New Testament scholar and author. He was formerly chaplain and dean of Peterhouse, Cambridge and vice-provost of Coventry Cathedral. He is dean emeritus of Chester Cathedral. Smalley has also taught at the universities of Ibadan and Manchester. He is the author of The Revelation to John: A Commentary on the Greek Text of the Apocalypse.

Volume 52a: Revelation 1–5

  • Author: David E. Aune
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 592

An advocate of source criticism and an expert in early Christian prophecy, David Aune examines the full range of secular and biblical literature in search of possible sources for the striking literary devices in Revelation—over three volumes and more than 1,500 pages. His mastery of an incredibly broad range of ancient writings enables him to compare every pericope of Revelation to the literary traditions of the ages that preceded its writing, and thus to evaluate the possible sources for the forms John employed to write his vision. Aune’s detailed introductory comments scrutinize the entire expanse of this mysterious book, providing a monumental treatment of Revelation’s textual history. He provides an expanded outline of all twenty-two chapters and focuses on the implications for the book of Revelation in such matters as:

  • the use of chronological eschatological visions
  • the recurring sets of sevens
  • the paired angelic revelations beginning in 17:1 and 21:9
  • the scenes in the heavenly throne room with their hymns
  • possible connections between the scrolls in chapters 5 and 10

David E. Aune is Walter Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at the University of Notre Dame. In 2012 he was named the honorary president for life of the Chicago Society of Biblical research. He is the author of The New Testament in Its Literary Environment, Prophecy in Early Christianity and the Ancient Mediterranean World, and Apocalypticism, Prophecy, and Magic in Early Christianity: Collected Essays.

Volume 52b: Revelation 6–16

  • Author: David E. Aune
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 576

An advocate of source criticism and an expert in early Christian prophecy, David Aune examines the full range of secular and biblical literature in search of possible sources for the striking literary devices in Revelation—over three volumes and more than 1,500 pages. His mastery of an incredibly broad range of ancient writings enables him to compare every pericope of Revelation to the literary traditions of the ages that preceded its writing, and thus to evaluate the possible sources for the forms John employed to write his vision. Aune’s detailed introductory comments scrutinize the entire expanse of this mysterious book, providing a monumental treatment of Revelation’s textual history. He provides an expanded outline of all twenty-two chapters and focuses on the implications for the book of Revelation in such matters as:

  • the use of chronological eschatological visions
  • the recurring sets of sevens
  • the paired angelic revelations beginning in 17:1 and 21:9
  • the scenes in the heavenly throne room with their hymns
  • possible connections between the scrolls in chapters 5 and 10

David E. Aune is Walter Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at the University of Notre Dame. In 2012 he was named the honorary president for life of the Chicago Society of Biblical research. He is the author of The New Testament in Its Literary Environment, Prophecy in Early Christianity and the Ancient Mediterranean World, and Apocalypticism, Prophecy, and Magic in Early Christianity: Collected Essays.

Volume 52c: Revelation 17–22

  • Author: David E. Aune
  • Editor: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Word Biblical Commentary
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson
  • Publication Date: 1998
  • Pages: 504

An advocate of source criticism and an expert in early Christian prophecy, David Aune examines the full range of secular and biblical literature in search of possible sources for the striking literary devices in Revelation—over three volumes and more than 1,500 pages. His mastery of an incredibly broad range of ancient writings enables him to compare every pericope of Revelation to the literary traditions of the ages that preceded its writing, and thus to evaluate the possible sources for the forms John employed to write his vision. Aune’s detailed introductory comments scrutinize the entire expanse of this mysterious book, providing a monumental treatment of Revelation’s textual history. He provides an expanded outline of all twenty-two chapters and focuses on the implications for the book of Revelation in such matters as:

  • the use of chronological eschatological visions
  • the recurring sets of sevens
  • the paired angelic revelations beginning in 17:1 and 21:9
  • the scenes in the heavenly throne room with their hymns
  • possible connections between the scrolls in chapters 5 and 10

David E. Aune is Walter Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at the University of Notre Dame. In 2012 he was named the honorary president for life of the Chicago Society of Biblical research. He is the author of The New Testament in Its Literary Environment, Prophecy in Early Christianity and the Ancient Mediterranean World, and Apocalypticism, Prophecy, and Magic in Early Christianity: Collected Essays.

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