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Overview

This massive collection from IVP combines the Tyndale Old Testament Commentary (TOTC) and the Tyndale New Testament Commentary (TNTC) to provide an exposition of Scripture that is thorough and abreast of modern scholarship, yet at the same time loyal to Scripture as the infallible Word of God.

The Tyndale Commentary Series has long been a trusted resource for Bible study. Written by some of the world’s most distinguished evangelical scholars, each book offers clear, reliable, and relevant expositions.

The Tyndale Bible Commentaries are designed to help the reader of the Bible understand what the text says and what it means. The Introduction to each book gives a concise but thorough treatment of its authorship, date, original setting and purpose. Following a structural analysis, the Commentary takes the book section-by-section, drawing out its main themes, and also comments on individual verses and problems of interpretation. Additional Notes provide fuller discussion of particular difficulties. The aim throughout is to explain the true meaning of the Bible and make its message plain.

With Logos Bible Software, you can reap the maximum benefit from the combined TOTC and TNTC, by getting easier access to the contents of this series—helping you to use these volumes more efficiently for research and sermon preparation. Every word from every book has been indexed and catalogued to help you search the entire series for a particular verse or topic, giving you instant access to cross-references. Along with this, your titles will automatically integrate into custom search reports, passage guides, exegetical guides, and the other advanced features of Logos Bible Software.

What’s more, with Logos, every word is essentially a link. Scripture references are linked directly to Greek and Hebrew texts, along with the English Bible translations of your choice. That gives you access to technical linguistic data, along with the tools for accurate exegesis and interpretation.

Key Features

  • Contains the combined TOTC and TNTC
  • Includes the whole Old and New Testaments
  • Section-by-section examination of the text
  • Introduction to authorship, date, and historical background for each book
  • Links directly to original language texts and English Bible translations
  • Long-trusted commentaries from the Tyndale Commentary Series from IVP

Praise for the Print Edition

Tyndale Commentaries are always useful, not least because they focus so clearly on the text of Scripture, and do not fall into the trap of paying too much attention to other Commentaries and not enough to the scriptural text they are intended to expound and explain. So they retain their usefulness for preachers, Bible study leaders and for all readers of the Bible.

Peter Adam, principal, Ridley College, Melbourne, Australia

Within its constraints, this series includes some outstanding volumes.

D.A. Carson, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

The Tyndale volumes have long been the premier shorter-length commentary series on both Testaments throughout the English-speaking world.

Craig Blomberg, Denver Seminary

The evenness and quality of this series are remarkable.

Christianity Today

There simply is no series of medium-length Commentaries that approaches the excellence of the Tyndale Commentaries.

Donald A. Hagner, Fuller Theological Seminary

Product Details

Genesis

  • Author: Derek Kidner
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 236

Genesis—the Bible’s account of human origins and the harbinger of human destiny—is a book teeming with critical questions. Who wrote it? When? Does the account of creation square with modern science? What about Adam and Eve? Derek Kidner not only provides a running exegetical commentary, but also lucidly handles the tough issues that Genesis raises. His clear prose and theological insight will expand readers’ understanding of God’s character and of human nature and destiny.

Derek Kidner was formerly Warden of Tyndale House, Cambridge.

Exodus

  • Author: R. Alan Cole
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 249

Exodus, Cole says, is ‘the centre of the Old Testament.’ It recounts the supreme Old Testament example of the saving acts of God, narrates the instituting of Passover and enshrines the giving of God’s law. It portrays Moses, the prototype of all Israel’s prophets, and Aaron, the first high priest.

The book of Exodus is especially important to Christians because Christ fulfilled its great themes: he accomplished God’s greatest act of deliverance; he became the Passover lamb; he sealed a new covenant with his blood. ‘No book therefore will more repay careful study, if we wish to understand the central message of the New Testament, than this book.’

The late R. Alan Cole was lecturer in Old Testament at Moore Theological College, Sydney, and Trinity Theological College, Singapore.

Leviticus

  • Author: R. K. Harrison
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 254

Levitical rules and regulations regarding blood and sacrifice, offerings and priests, cleanness and uncleanness at first appear irrelevant to contemporary Christians. Yet large portions of the New Testament can hardly be understood at all apart from some understanding of these Old Testament concepts. What does it mean for believers to be a royal priesthood? A holy nation? For Christ to be our great high priest? Our Passover lamb? R. K. Harrison illuminates these ideas within their Old Testament context, thus providing the needed background for their New Testament development.

The late R. K. Harrison was professor of Old Testament, Wycliffe College, University of Toronto. He was an Associate Editor for the Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible (4 vols).

Leviticus

  • Author: Jay Sklar
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Levitical rules and regulations can at first appear irrelevant to contemporary Christians—but they provide important Old Testament background for understanding large portions of the New Testament. Leviticus describes a point in human history when God came and dwelt in the midst of the ancient Israelites and taught them what their purpose in life really was. Jay Sklar’s commentary makes clear what it is that the Lord said to them and, in so doing, makes clear what he says to us today.

This new commentary fills the place of the previous one written by R.K. Harrison and brings this sometimes difficult text even more keenly into focus for modern readers.

If you have always baulked at reading Leviticus, then get this book, and use it as a guide. It will be money and time well-spent.

—John de Hoog, Vox Reformata

Pastors, seminarians, and Bible teachers will surely benefit from this volume, and its readers will likely quote many of Sklar’s modern-day analogies.

—Kazuyuki Hayashi, Journal for the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament, 5.1 (2016)

Jay Sklar (PhD, University of Gloucestershire) is professor of Old Testament and dean of faculty at Covenant Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri.

Numbers

  • Author: Gordon J. Wenham
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 192

Numbers - ‘Its very title puts the modern reader off’, writes Gordon Wenham. ‘In ancient times numbers were seen as mysterious and symbolic, a key to reality and the mind of God himself. Today they are associated with computers and the depersonalization that threatens our society.’

In his effort to bridge the great gulf between the book and our own age, Wenham first explains the background of Numbers, discussing its structure, sources, date and authorship as well as its theology and Christian use. A passage-by-passage analysis follows, drawing on social anthropology to offer helpful insights into Old Testament ritual.

Gordon J. Wenham is lecturer in Old Testament, Trinity College Bristol. He was formerly Professor of Old Testament at the University of Gloucestershire.

Deuteronomy

  • Author: John A. Thompson
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 349

Thousands camped east of the Jordan, ready to cross it, eradicate a decadent culture and establish their own nation. Their remarkable leader Moses, soon to die, stood and spoke to them. He reminded them of their covenant relation to Yahweh their Lord, of Yahweh’s mighty acts on their behalf, of the practical differences their loyalty to Yahweh should make. He implored them to be totally devoted to their sovereign God.

The book of Deuteronomy records these speeches. For J. A. Thompson, we cannot fail to be challenged by the persistent demands throughout the book that we should acknowledge the complete and sole sovereignty of God in our lives. Nor can we fail to be touched by the noble concept of God that underlies the whole book.

The late John A. Thompson was the first director of the Australian Institute of Archaeology in Melbourne. While in Melbourne, he lectured in the School of Middle Eastern Studies at the University, and was lecturer in Old Testament studies in the Baptist Theological College of New South Wales. Making a special study of biblical archaeology, Thompson engaged in field work with ASOR at Roman Jericho and at Dibon in Transjordan. He held degrees from the University of Queensland and the University of Melbourne in science, the arts, and divinity. His doctorate came from the University of Cambridge, UK, in Oriental Studies. He authored The Bible and Archaeology as well as the volume on 1st & 2nd Chronicles that is part of The New American Commentary (31 vols.).

Deuteronomy

  • Author: Edward J. Woods
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 333

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Deuteronomy has been aptly described as a book “on the boundary.” It addresses the possibilities of new life “beyond the Jordan” as dependent upon Israel’s keeping of the law and acknowledgment of Yahweh’s supremacy. Moses leaves the people with his last will and testament that would ensure their success and well-being in the new land.

In this completely new volume on Deuteronomy in the Tyndale Commentary series, Edward Woods expounds upon the book’s breathtaking and all-encompassing vision. He shows how the Israelites—from king to ordinary citizen—were exhorted to make its words the interpreter of their life’s story within the land.

Edward J. Woods, now retired, was formerly senior lecturer in Old Testament at the Melbourne School of Theology, Victoria, Australia (formerly the Bible College of Victoria), where he still teaches part time. He has also served as a moderator in Old Testament studies for the Australian College of Theology, as a pastor in Australia and as a theological teacher in Northern Zambia.

Joshua

  • Author: Richard S. Hess
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 352

The book of Joshua memorializes a transitional episode in Israel’s national history. The heroic figure Joshua leads the new generation of Israel across the Jordan and into the land of promise, conquering Canaanites and overseeing the allotment of the inheritance among the tribes.

However, the book of Joshua is foremost a story of God, who works powerfully on behalf of Israel and Joshua, fulfilling his covenant promises. In the final chapter, it is God who receives Israel’s worshipful recommitment at Shechem.

Richard S. Hess explores the historical, theological and literary dimensions of the book of Joshua, and presents evidence for placing the events of Joshua in the late second millennium BC.

Richard Hess (Ph. D., Hebrew Union College) is Professor of Old Testament at Denver Seminary. He is the author or editor of a numerous titles, including Israel’s Messiah in the Bible and the Dead Sea Scrolls (Baker Academic) and Commentaries on the Song of Songs and Joshua. He is a contributor to the Dictionary of the Old Testament and the New Dictionary of Biblical Theology (Both IVP).

Judges & Ruth

  • Authors: Arthur E. Cundall and Leon Morris
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 307

The book of Judges presents Israel’s human frailty, the nation’s need for both spiritual and political deliverance, and God’s use of flawed human leaders to guide and preserve his chosen people through a dark period of their history.

The book of Ruth tells a smaller story within this larger narrative, showing God quietly at work in the lives of a few pious individuals, remaining true to his covenant and his people.

Cundall and Morris place each book in its historical and canonical context, not only rendering each useful for scholarly study but also demonstrating their contemporary relevance.

Arthur E. Cundall was Principal of the Bible College of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.

The late Leon Morris was Principal of Ridley College, Melbourne, Australia. He contributed to the Pillar New Testament Commentary (8 vols.) with his volumes on The Gospel according to Matthew and The Epistle to the Romans.

1 & 2 Samuel

  • Author: Joyce G. Baldwin
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 240

The stories of Samuel, Saul, and David are among the most memorable in the Old Testament. Yet the lives of these individuals are bound up in the larger story of God’s purpose for his people. Looking beyond the well-known surface of these stories, Joyce Baldwin explores the meaning of the biblical history of Israel’s vital transition from a confederation of tribes to nationhood under a king. This commentary provides an excellent introduction to the critical issues of authorship, date, composition and structure of Samuel, as well as an able discussion of its theological themes.

The late Joyce G. Baldwin was Principal of Trinity College, Bristol.

1 & 2 Kings

  • Author: Donald J. Wiseman
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 339

The book of Kings is a unique source for understanding the history of Israel from the last days of the united kingdom under David to the eventual fall of the kingdoms of Israel and Judah. Presenting Israel’s national history from a divine viewpoint, these narratives measure the kings of Israel and Judah not by the mark they leave on secular history, but by their “doing what is right in the Lord’s sight.” Embedded in this story are enduring lessons of the ways of God with his people in every age.

In this commentary, Donald Wiseman brings to this portion of Scripture his lifelong study of the archaeology, history, languages and documents of the ancient Near East. No other commentary on Kings offers as much historical background and well-considered judgment in such concise and accessible form.

Donald J. Wiseman is Prefessor of Assyriology at the University of London.

1 Chronicles

  • Author: Martin J. Selman
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 274

The Chronicler addressed an Israel separated from its former days of blessing by a season of judgment. The books of 1 and 2 Chronicles bring a divine word of healing and reaffirm the hope of restoration. The Chronicler’s theme is straightforward - the promises of God revealed in the Davidic covenant are as trustworthy and as effective as the God who first uttered them.

Martin Selman provides an excellent interpretation of these sorely neglected yet profound Old Testament books. He surveys the Chronicler’s method and summarizes major theological themes.

The late Martin J. Selman was Deputy Principal at Spurgeon’s College, London.

2 Chronicles

  • Author: Martin J. Selman
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 292

The Chronicler addressed an Israel separated from its former days of blessing by a season of judgment. The books of 1 and 2 Chronicles bring a divine word of healing and reaffirm the hope of restoration. The Chronicler’s theme is straightforward - the promises of God revealed in the Davidic covenant are as trustworthy and as effective as the God who first uttered them.

Martin Selman provides an excellent interpretation of these sorely neglected yet profound Old Testament books. This volume on 2 Chronicles builds on the groundwork laid by its companion in 1 Chronicles.

The late Martin J. Selman was Deputy Principal at Spurgeon’s College, London.

Ezra & Nehemiah

  • Author: Derek Kidner
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 192

“The chequered story of the Kings, a matter of nearly five centuries, had ended disastrously in 587 BC with the sack of Jerusalem, the fall of the monarchy and the removal to Babylonia of all that made Judah politically viable. It was a death to make way for a rebirth.” So begins Derek Kidner’s commentary on the books of Ezra and Nehemiah, which chart the Jews’ return from exile to Jerusalem and the beginnings of that rebirth. As the drama unfolds, above all and through all we see the good hand of God at work.

Derek Kidner was formerly Warden of Tyndale House, Cambridge.

Esther (1st ed.)

  • Author: Joyce G. Baldwin
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 126

The Jews were threatened with genocide. A decree ordered the extermination of young and old, women and children. The place: Persia. The time: fifth century B.C. The book of Esther describes how this crisis was averted through the bravery of Esther, the wisdom of her stepfather and the unity of the Jewish people. It also reveals the God who quietly—and sometimes unexpectedly—works behind the scenes to order the events of our lives. Joyce Baldwin draws out the beauty and power of this book by discussing its background, structure and theology, and by providing a passage-by-passage analysis of its contents.

The late Joyce G. Baldwin was Principal of Trinity College, Bristol.

Esther (2nd ed.)

  • Author: Debra Reid
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 168

The place: Persia. The time: fifth century BC. The Jews were threatened with genocide. A decree ordered the extermination of young and old, women and children. The book of Esther describes how this crisis was averted through the bravery of Esther, the wisdom of her stepfather and the unity of the Jewish people. It also reveals the God who quietly - and sometimes unexpectedly - works behind the scenes to order the events of our lives.

Debra Reid is Director of Open Learning at Spurgeon’s College, London. She is the author of Ruth, Esther and Psalms 73–150 in the Crossway Bible Guides, a contributor to several reference works, and has been involved in the publication of a variety of Bible editions and new translations.

Job

  • Author: Francis I. Andersen
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 318

For Francis Andersen, the Old Testament book about Job is one of the supreme offerings of the human mind to the living God, and one of the best gifts of God to humanity. “The task of understanding it is as rewarding as it is strenuous. . . . One is constantly amazed at its audacious theology and at the magnitude of its intellectual achievement. Job is a prodigious book in the vast range of its ideas, in its broad coverage of human experience, in the intensity of its passion, in the immensity of its concept of God, and not least in its superb literary craftsmanship. . . . From one man’s agony it reaches out to the mystery of God, beyond words and explanations.”

Francis I. Andersen is research fellow with the Australian Institute of Archaeology.

Psalms 1–72

  • Author: Derek Kidner
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 196

“The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.” “Thy word is a lamp to my feet.” “Search me, O God, and know my heart!” Such phrases leap to mind each time a Christian lifts his heart to God. For many, in fact, the Psalms are the richest part of the Old Testament. Derek Kidner provides a fresh and penetrating guide to Psalms 1–72. He analyses each psalm in depth, comments on interpretative questions and brings out the universal relevance of the texts. He also gives special help on the psalmists’ cries for vengeance. Together with its companion volume (Psalms 73–150) this introduction and commentary will inspire and deepen personal worship.

Derek Kidner was formerly Warden of Tyndale House, Cambridge.

Psalms 73–150

  • Author: Derek Kidner
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 1975
  • Pages: 529

“The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.” “Thy word is a lamp to my feet.” “Search me, O God, and know my heart!” Such phrases leap to mind each time a Christian lifts his heart to God. For many, in fact, the Psalms are the richest part of the Old Testament. Derek Kidner provides a fresh and penetrating guide to Psalms 73–150. He analyses each psalm in depth, comments on interpretative questions and brings out the universal relevance of the texts. He also gives special help on the psalmists’ cries for vengeance. Together with its companion volume (Psalms 73–150) this introduction and commentary will inspire and deepen personal worship.

Derek Kidner (1913–2008) was an Old Testament scholar and ordained minister in the Church of England. He was the author of several commentaries in the Tyndale Old Testament Commentaries series, perhaps most notably, his commentary on the Psalms. He retired in 1978 and died at age 95 in Histon, England in 2008.

Psalms

  • Author: Tremper Longman III
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 479

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of Psalms is the heart of the Old Testament, the libretto of the most vibrant worship imaginable. It informs our intellect, stimulates our imagination, arouses our emotions and stirs us to holy thoughts and actions. It is also a pivotal witness to, and anticipation of, Jesus Christ. Tremper Longman’s commentary interprets each psalm in its Old Testament setting, summarizes its message and reflects on its significance from a New Testament perspective, noting any citation and also providing a Christological reading.

This fresh commentary brings new perspectives from the two previous Tyndale commentaries on the Psalms by Derek Kidner.

This is a significant work of scholarship, accessible to the general audience, which provides both a compelling framework and an applicatory trajectory that is Christ-focused, all of which will gratify the judicious reader.

—Josh Moody, Journal for the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament, 5.1 (2016)

Longman’s contribution is a solid, sober, and up-to-date revision of an influential commentary on the book of Psalms in a series designed for pastors, students, and laypeople and will serve the readership well for the next generation.

—John C. Crutchfield, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 58, no. 3

Tremper Longman III (PhD, Yale University) is Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California. He is also visiting professor of Old Testament at Seattle School of Theology and Psychology and adjunct of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary. He lectures regularly at Regent College in Vancouver and the Canadian Theological Seminary in Calgary.

Proverbs

  • Author: Derek Kidner
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 189

Proverbs—a book full of wisdom, and yet a book demanding all one’s wisdom to understand. Derek Kidner has not only provided a running commentary on the whole of Proverbs, but has also included two helpful study aids: a set of subject guides that bring together teaching scattered throughout the book, and a short concordance that helps locate lost sayings (in territory notoriously hard to search) and encourages further subject studies. In short, this volume is a wise person’s guide to wisdom.

Derek Kidner was formerly Warden of Tyndale House, Cambridge.

Ecclesiastes

  • Author: Michael A. Eaton
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 128

“If it needs a man who has suffered to write a commentary on Job . . . . Perhaps the only person entitled to comment on Ecclesiastes is a cynic who has revolted from the world in disillusionment and disgust.” “If so,” writes Michael Eaton, “I qualify.”

Scholars have long wrestled with the gloomy pessimism and striking omission of any mention of Yahweh in this portion of the Wisdom literature. After setting forth the issues related to the text, authorship, date and canonicity, Eaton assesses the purpose and structure of the book. He then provides a passage-by-passage analysis that attempts to account for the oddities of the text and to show its contemporary relevance.

Michael A. Eaton has served as lecturer in Old Testament at Baptist Theological College of Southern Africa and is pastor-at-large of Chrisco Fellowship of Churches in Nairobi, Kenya.

The Song of Solomon

  • Author: G. Lloyd Carr
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 192

In the Song of Solomon, ‘the best of songs’, we hear the passionate melody of romantic love - but whose love is described? Is it a couple’s love for each other, God’s love for Israel, or Christ’s love for the church? This Old Testament book has fascinated and perplexed interpreters for centuries. They have felt uncomfortable - even embarrassed - when confronted with its strange and erotic imagery. With his own unique style, Lloyd Carr skilfully explains the meaning of this ancient love story in a way that can be clearly grasped and applied by Christians living in today’s world.

G. Lloyd Carr is Emeritus Professor of Biblical and Theological Studies, Gordon College, Wenham, Massachusetts.

The Song of Songs

  • Author: Iain M. Duguid
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 160

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This Old Testament book, ‘the best of songs’, has fascinated and perplexed interpreters for centuries. We hear the passionate melody of romantic love, and are confronted by erotic imagery—but whose love is described? Is it a couple’s love for each other, God’s love for his people, or a poem that speaks to love in all its dimensions? Iain Duguid’s commentary explains how the Song is designed to show us an idealized picture of married love, in the context of a fallen and broken world. It also convicts us of how far short of this perfection we fall, both as humans and as lovers, and drives us repeatedly into the arms of our true heavenly husband, Jesus Christ.

Replacing G. Lloyd Carr’s The Song of Solomon, Duguid’s commentary on the Song of Songs utilizes up-to-date scholarship to paint a fresh picture of this provocative Old Testament text.

As one who found the original Tyndale OT Commentaries extremely helpful, this reviewer can only express the desire that all volumes from the original series will be rewritten with the same clarity as the volume that has been reviewed here.

—Ellis R. Brotzman, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 58, no. 3

Throughout Song of Songs the reader is pushed to know, meditate upon, and apply biblical wisdom in regards to marriage. Duguid has written an excellent commentary that calls one to draw closer to God. This work is a welcome addition for students seeking to get an introductory view of the Song of Songs, and it will be an excellent addition to any pastor’s library.

—Brian Koning, Journal of Biblical and Theological Studies, Vol. 2, Issue 1

Iain M. Duguid (PhD, University of Cambridge) is professor of Old Testament at Grove City College and pastor of Christ Presbyterian Church in Grove City, Pennsylvania. He has also served as a missionary in Liberia, taught at Reformed Seminary and Westminster Seminary California, and planted churches in Fallbrook, California, and Oxford, England. Some of Duguid’s other work includes books such as Living in the Gap Between Promise and Reality and Hero of Heroes, as well as commentaries on Ezekiel, Daniel, Ruth, Esther and more. He was a translator for the Holman Christian Standard Version of the Bible and is a contributor to the New Living Translation Study Bible, the HCSV Study Bible and the ESV Study Bible.

Isaiah

  • Author: J. Alec Motyer
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 461

The book of Isaiah is perhaps the most compelling of all Old Testament prophecy. No other prophet rivals Isaiah’s brilliance of style, powerful imagery and clear vision of the messianic hope. Unlike many commentators who divide Isaiah between chapters 1 - 39 and 40 - 66, J. Alec Motyer instead identifies three messianic portraits: the King (1 - 37), the Servant (38 - 55), and the Anointed Conqueror (56 - 66). These three portraits are expounded in Motyer’s lucid, insightful and probing commentary.

J. Alec Motyer was formerly Principal of Trinity College, Bristol. He has also written The Prophecy of Isaiah, a landmark, single-volume commentary on the prophecy of Isaiah, available for Logos.

Jeremiah & Lamentations

  • Author: R. K. Harrison
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 192

With the ancient Near East in a state of ferment and the nation of Judah experiencing a succession of political crises, God stationed a man on the scene to speak the divine word. Jeremiah was called by God to the unhappy task of telling an unheeding nation it was going to be judged and destroyed. Often he seemed to despair, yet he continued to utter God’s truth fearlessly, leaving as part of his spiritual legacy a demonstration of a man’s ability to make religious life an essentially personal relationship with God. The structural analysis of this commentary, along with the historical and cultural background it provides, opens up to modern readers one of the Old Testament’s most fascinating books.

The late R. K. Harrison was professor of Old Testament, Wycliffe College, University of Toronto. He was an Associate Editor for the Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible (4 vols).

Jeremiah and Lamentations

  • Author: Hetty Lalleman
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 373

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Despite the themes of doom and destruction, the primary message of Jeremiah is one of the love and grace of a God who never gives up on those he has called to be his own. The prophet’s life is characterized by suffering, but he points to a new beginning, a new covenant and a new hope, eventually made possible through the unique Suffering Servant. Lamentations powerfully expresses personal and national suffering. Yet, even in these utterances of desperate grief, there are glimpses of hope.

Replacing the earlier Tyndale commentary by R.K. Harrison, in this new volume, Hetty Lalleman opens up these fascinating books for today’s readers.

Hetty Lalleman is tutor in Old Testament studies at Spurgeon’s College, London. She is the author of Celebrating the Law? Rethinking Old Testament Ethics, and is on the advisory board for an Old Testament commentary series in Dutch, to which she has contributed a volume on Jeremiah. Her PhD thesis was entitled Jeremiah in Prophetic Tradition.

Ezekiel

  • Author: John B. Taylor
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 277

“For most Bible readers Ezekiel is almost a closed book,” writes John Taylor. “Their knowledge of him extends little further than his mysterious vision of God’s chariot-throne, with its wheels within wheels, and the vision of the valley of the dry bones ... In its structure, however, if not in its thought and language, the book of Ezekiel has a basic simplicity, and its orderly framework makes it easy to analyse.” Taylor’s commentary offers a portrait of the prophet, places his prophecies within their historical settings, and provides an overview of the book’s contents and themes.

John B. Taylor was formerly Bishop of St Albans, England.

Daniel

  • Author: Joyce G. Baldwin
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 168

Daniel is a difficult book. But it is a book about the meaning of history, and people today need its message. The whole church needs reassurance, especially in view of Marxist claims to be able by human effort to introduce a utopian world government. “When the church lets part of its message go by default people look elsewhere for a substitute,” writes Joyce Baldwin. “All the more reason, then, why the church needs to be counting on the certainties proclaimed by Daniel, namely that God is constantly overruling and judging in the affairs of men, putting down the mighty from their seats, overthrowing unjust regimes and effectively bringing in His kingdom, which is to embrace all nations.”

The late Joyce G. Baldwin was Principal of Trinity College, Bristol.

Hosea

  • Author: David Allan Hubbard
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 188

A wanton and adulterous woman repeatedly spurns the love of her youth. Her betrayed and grieving husband offers forgiveness and seeks to restore the intimacy of their first love.

Bold imagery indeed for telling the story of God and his people. Bolder still when God calls a prophet to enflesh this divine suffering and redeeming forgiveness in his own marriage. Yet this remarkable story sets the stage for Hosea’s message of God’s enduring love, his righteous judgement and his persistent offer of reconciliation.

This commentary explores the historical, cultural, literary and theological dimensions of the book of Hosea. Distilled from a career of biblical scholarship, theological reflection and masterful teaching, David Hubbard has been studying, teaching and thinking about Hosea for a long time. He frankly admits he can’t imagine himself “as a human being, let alone as a believing person, without the deposit of Hosea’s political, moral and spiritual insights.” Find out why

David Allan Hubbard also wrote the volumes on Proverbs and Ecclesiastes / Song of Solomon as part of The Preacher’s Commentary Series.

Joel & Amos

  • Author: David Allan Hubbard
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 196

Joel’s arresting imagery—blasting trumpet, darkened sun and marching hosts—has shaped the church’s eschatological vision of a day of wrath. Amos’s ringing indictments—callous oppression, heartless worship and self-seeking gain—have periodically awakened the conscience of God’s people.

Twenty-five-hundred years after they were first born, those prophetic words never fail to awaken and arrest. Viewed against the background of their culture and society, artistry and context, these visions and oracles take on even more vibrant colors and cleaner lines.

This commentary is a valuable guide to the fascinating world and challenging word of these two prophets. Ever mindful of the wider context and composition of these ancient but living texts, David Hubbard shows how Joel and Amos addressed Israel’s mind and heart.

David Allan Hubbard also wrote the volumes on Proverbs and Ecclesiastes / Song of Solomon as part of The Preacher’s Commentary Series.

Obadiah, Jonah, Micah

  • Authors: T. Desmond Alexander, David W. Baker and Bruce Waltke
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 166

Obadiah’s oracle against Edom. Jonah’s mission to the city of Nineveh. Micah’s message to Samaria and Jerusalem. The texts of these minor but important prophets receive a fresh and penetrating analysis in this introduction and commentary. The authors consider each book’s historical setting, composition, structure and authorship, as well as important themes and issues. Each book is then expounded in the concise and informative style that has become the hallmark of the Tyndale series.

T. Desmond Alexander is director of Christian training at Union Theological College in Belfast, Northern Ireland. From 1980 to 1999, he was lecturer in Semitic studies at the Queen’s University of Belfast. His main field of research is the Pentateuch, about which he has written extensively in academic journals and books. Alexander also has a special interest in the relationship between the Old and New Testaments. He is the author of From Paradise to the Promised Land: An Introduction to the Main Themes of the Pentateuch and Abraham in the Negev, and he is a coeditor (with Brian S. Rosner) of the New Dictionary of Biblical Theology (IVP, 2000), available from Logos as part of The Essential IVP Reference Collection Version 3.

David W. Baker is professor of Old Testament and Semitic languages at Ashland Theological Seminary in Ashland, Ohio. He serves as editor for the Evangelical Theological Society Dissertation and Evangelical Theological Society Studies series as well as for Sources for Biblical and Theological Studies (Eisenbrauns, Winona Lake). He is coauthor (with Bill T. Arnold) of The Face of Old Testament Studies: A Survey of Contemporary Approaches. In addition, he has written many articles, essays and Commentaries.

Together, T. Desmond Alexander and David W. Baker edited the Dictionary of the Old Testament: Pentateuch, part of the IVP Dictionary of the Old Testament Bundle (2 vols.).

Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah

  • Author: David W. Baker
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 98

Nahum’s prophecy of Nineveh’s coming destruction. Habakkuk’s probing dialogue with the Lord of Israel. Zephaniah’s warning to Jerusalem’s last great king. The texts of these minor but important prophets receive a fresh and penetrating analysis in this introduction and commentary. David W. Baker considers each book’s historical setting, composition, structure and authorship as well as important themes and issues. Each book is then expounded passage by passage in the concise and informative style that has become the hallmark of the Tyndale Old Testament Commentaries.

David W. Baker is professor of Old Testament and Semitic languages at Ashland Theological Seminary in Ashland, Ohio. He serves as editor for the Evangelical Theological Society Dissertation and Evangelical Theological Society Studies series as well as for Sources for Biblical and Theological Studies (Eisenbrauns, Winona Lake). He is coauthor (with Bill T. Arnold) of The Face of Old Testament Studies: A Survey of Contemporary Approaches. In addition, he has written many articles, essays and Commentaries. He coedited the Dictionary of the Old Testament: Pentateuch, part of the IVP Dictionary of the Old Testament Bundle (2 vols.).

Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi

  • Author: Joyce G. Baldwin
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 202

Three neglected but important prophets receive a fresh and penetrating analysis in this introduction and commentary. For each prophet’s work, Joyce Baldwin first considers the general issues of author, text and message, then offers a passage-by-passage commentary. “Considerable attention has been given in the book to background material, and proper consideration is accorded to the views of those from whom the author differs,” writes reviewer R. K. Harrison. “In expounding the text, Baldwin produces evidence of balanced scholarship and a high degree of spiritual insight.”

The late Joyce G. Baldwin was Principal of Trinity College, Bristol.

Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi

  • Author: Andrew E. Hill
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 368

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Despite the return of the Hebrews from the Babylonian exile, selfishness, apathy and despair crippled their community spirit. In response to this distress, God raised up three prophetic voices in Jerusalem. Haggai rallied the people to rebuild the Second Temple. Zechariah was given visions of the return of the glory of the Lord to Zion. Malachi preached repentance, covenant justice and restoration of proper temple worship. Andrew Hill’s excellent commentary on these oracles shows how they remain timely for the Christian church’s worship and mission in the world.

This newly composed commentary from Hill replaces the edition written by the late Joyce Baldwin.

Andrew E. Hill is professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. He is the author of commentaries on Malachi (Anchor Bible Commentary) and 1 & 2 Chronicles (NIVAC), coauthor of A Survey of the Old Testament and the Cornerstone Biblical Commentary on the minor prophets, and coeditor of The Baker Illustrated Bible Commentary.

Matthew

  • Author: R. T. France
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 422

Matthew—the visit of the Magi, the Sermon on the Mount, the Great Commission: these are only a few of the well-known passages that draw readers specifically to Matthew’s gospel. Yet it begins with a forbidding list of unknown names and apparently irrelevant ‘begettings.’ In fact, the early church may have placed Matthew first in the New Testament because it more fully than any other Gospel provides a Christian perspective on the relation between the church and the Jews, an issue that is still important today. R. T. France tackles this and other key issues in the Gospel with clarity, reliability and relevance.

R. T. France was formerly Principal of Wycliffe Hall, Oxford. He contributed to the New International Greek Testament Commentary (NIGTC) with his volume on The Gospel of Mark.

Mark

  • Author: R. Alan Cole
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 340

Who is Jesus? What is salvation? What is the good news? Our earliest written account of Jesus’ ministry is widely acknowledged to be that of the Gospel of Mark. If so, it remains key in our answering these questions. Alan Cole treads a careful path between exclusively this-worldly or other-worldly interpretations of this landmark Gospel. His commentary provides a helpful starting point for all contemporary preaching and teaching from this Gospel.

The late R. Alan Cole was lecturer in Old Testament at Moore Theological College, Sydney, and Trinity Theological College, Singapore.

Mark

  • Author: Eckhard J. Schnabel
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Pages: 441

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Mark wrote his Gospel to explain why and how Jesus is the Messiah and Son of God who fulfills God’s promises as he proclaims and embodies the coming kingdom of God. Mark emphasizes Jesus’ authority and also his suffering and death as God’s will for his messianic mission. Eckhard Schnabel’s commentary seeks to help today’s Christian disciples communicate the significance of Jesus and the transforming power of the good news. Schnabel’s volume replaces the previous commentary from R. Alan Cole.

Eckhard J. Schnabel (PhD, University of Aberdeen) is Mary F. Rockefeller Distinguished Professor of New Testament Studies at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, Massachusetts. He has taught previously at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (Deerfield, Illinois), Freie Theologische Akademie (Giessen, Germany), Wiedenest Bible College (Bergneustadt, Germany), and Asian Theological Seminary (Manila, Philippines). His books include Early Christian Mission (volumes 1 & 2), Paul the Missionary, and Der erste Brief des Paulus an die Korinther. He is the author of numerous articles, including “Luke” (with David W. Pao) in Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament and contributions in Dictionary of Paul and His Letters and Dictionary of the Later New Testament & Its Developments.

Luke

  • Author: Leon Morris
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 370

The Gospel of Luke presents many unique pictures of Jesus. We see him in his Father’s house as a child, we see him deliberately associating with the poor and the disreputable, and we see him in communion with the Holy Spirit. But we also see the larger picture of Jesus setting out resolutely for Jerusalem in order to fulfil God’s plan for the world. With a critical awareness of scholarly discussions and a practical attentiveness to both the text and the reader, Leon Morris carefully places the themes of Luke’s Gospel within the context of God’s plan for all people.

The late Leon Morris was Principal of Ridley College, Melbourne, Australia. He contributed to the Pillar New Testament Commentary (8 vols.) with his volumes on The Gospel according to Matthew and The Epistle to the Romans.

John

  • Author: Colin Kruse
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 389

Among the Gospels, John’s is unique. It has a unique structure with long conversations and extended debates, and much of its content is not found elsewhere. Jesus’ relationship to the Father and his teaching on the Holy Spirit are given special prominence. Ultimately, faith, believing in Jesus, is at the centre —with signs highlighted to provoke faith and stories of those who responded to Jesus as examples of faith. Colin Kruse ably shows how the Fourth Gospel weaves its themes of belief and unbelief into its rich Christology.

Colin Kruse is lecturer in New Testament, Bible College of Victoria, Melbourne. He also contributed to the Pillar New Testament Commentary (8 vols.) with his volume on The Letters of John.

Acts

  • Author: I. Howard Marshall
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 447

In the book of Acts, the story of Jesus begun in the Gospel of Luke broadens into the story of the Holy Spirit, guiding the fledgling church to proclaim the saving reality of Jesus. While attentive to Luke’s roles as a literary artist and theologian, I. Howard Marshall focuses primarily on Luke’s role as a historian. He provides the reader with an accurate, balanced and holistic picture of the church’s monumental first years as it sought to fulfil Christ’s mandate to preach the gospel to the ends of the earth.

I. Howard Marshall is Honorary Research Professor of New Testament, University of Aberdeen. His many writings include, Luke - Historian and Theologian, New Testament Interpretation,Biblical Inspiration, The IVP New Testament Commentary Series: 1 Peter, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Pastoral Epistles (Marshall), and the 2005 ECPA Gold Medallion winner, New Testament Theology: Many Witnesses, One Gospel, among others.

Romans

  • Author: F. F. Bruce
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 283

Paul’s epistle to the Romans changed the lives of many great Christian thinkers, including Augustine, Martin Luther, John Wesley, and Karl Barth. However, while Romans has been among the most influential books of the New Testament, it has also been the subject of some of the church’s most heated debates. What is justification by faith? What is the relationship between law and grace? What is God’s ultimate purpose for Israel? Without losing sight of the simplicity of the gospel, F. F. Bruce guides us along the difficult but rewarding paths of this great letter.

The late F. F. Bruce was Emeritus Professor, University of Manchester. During his distinguished career he wrote numerous widely used Commentaries and books including The Canon of Scripture and Paul: Apostle of the Free Spirit. He contributed to the New International Greek Testament Commentary Series (12 Volumes) (NIGTC) and to the acclaimed Word Biblical Commentary Series (WBC) with volumes on The Epistle to the Galatians and 1 & 2 Thessalonians, respectively. He also contributed to Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary and from 1962 to 1990, he was the general editor of the New International Commentary on the New Testament series.

1 Corinthians

  • Author: Leon Morris
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 238

The cosmopolitan city of Corinth was the site of one of Paul’s greatest evangelistic successes. Yet despite Paul’s having founded the church there, it was full of contention and strife. Dissension ran the gamut from questions about leadership to incest. Some believers were taking fellow Christians to court. There were questions about marriage, celibacy, food offered to idols, public worship and spiritual gifts. In response Paul offered to them, and to us, some of his most profound thinking on the body of Christ, love, and the resurrection . Leon Morris, with his characteristic clarity and pastoral heart, sets the issues before us and offers perspectives on the letter’s perennial relevance.

The late Leon Morris was Principal of Ridley College, Melbourne, Australia. He contributed to the Pillar New Testament Commentary (8 vols.)with his volumes on The Gospel according to Matthew and The Epistle to the Romans.

2 Corinthians

  • Author: Colin Kruse
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 217

Paul’s long, complicated history with the Corinthian church culminates in this ardent defence of Christian ministry in general and of his own ministry in particular. Colin G. Kruse provides an insightful analysis that illuminates Paul’s contrast of the old and new and covenants and his eloquent exposition of the ministry of reconciliation. He also charts a clear, plausible course through the maze of the literary history of Paul’s correspondence with the Corinthian Christians.

Colin Kruse is lecturer in New Testament, Bible College of Victoria, Melbourne. He also contributed to the Pillar New Testament Commentary (8 vols.) with his volume on The Letters of John.

2 Corinthians

  • Author: Colin G. Kruse
  • Edition: Revised
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Paul’s long, complicated history with the Corinthian church culminates in this ardent defense of Christian ministry in general and of his own ministry in particular. Colin G. Kruse provides an insightful analysis that illuminates Paul’s contrast of the old and new and covenants and his eloquent exposition of the ministry of reconciliation. He also charts a clear, plausible course through the maze of the literary history of Paul’s correspondence with the Corinthian Christians.

This second edition has been thoroughly revised, expanded, and updated by Kruse in the light of more recent scholarship.

Colin G. Kruse (PhD, Fuller Theological Seminary) is senior lecturer of New Testament at Melbourne School of Theology. In the twenty years following his ordination into the Anglican ministry, Kruse gained practical experience in parishes in Australia and the U.S. along with five years of missionary service as a theological lecturer in Indonesia. Besides journal articles on the New Testament, Old Testament and the Dead Sea Scrolls, Kruse has authored several books including Paul, the Law and Justification and New Testament Models for Ministry: Jesus and Paul. He has also written the Tyndale New Testament Commentary on 2 Corinthians and the Pillar New Testament Commentary titles The Letters of John and Paul’s Letter to the Romans.

Galatians

  • Author: R. Alan Cole
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 242

In Galatians, the apostle Paul makes his most passionate and direct appeal for a gospel free of ethnic or ritual exclusion. Paul’s gospel is that of salvation through Christ alone - in him there is ‘neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.’ By placing Paul’s discussion firmly within its historical context, R. Alan Cole illuminates the potency and power of Paul’s message to the Galatian church.

The late R. Alan Cole was lecturer in Old Testament at Moore Theological College, Sydney, and Trinity Theological College, Singapore.

Ephesians

  • Author: Francis Foulkes
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 187

Unlike Paul’s letters to the Galatians or the Corinthians, the letter to the Ephesians contains almost no clues about the situation and issues its recipients faced. Nevertheless, the letter vividly depicts how God’s will revealed in Christ reorients believers’ lives toward unity, mutual respect, submission and love - in short, new life in Christ. Francis Foulkes expounds with clarity and ease the letter’s central themes and emphases.

The late Francis Foulkes was Warden of St John’s College, Auckland, New Zealand.

Philippians

  • Author: Ralph P. Martin
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 187

Paul’s letter to the Philippians may aptly be seen as a meditation on joy. But Paul’s joy, rather than the result of ease and comfort, is a contentedness made pure through suffering. He has ‘learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want.’ Ralph Martin shows how these themes flow from and emulate Christ’s humility, lead to spiritual fellowship among believers, and contribute to spreading the gospel.

Ralph P. Martin is Distinguished Scholar in Residence at Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California; at Haggard Graduate School of Theology, Azusa Pacific University, California; and at Logos Evangelical Seminary, El Monte, California. His writing include the Dictionary of the Later New Testament and Its Developments and several volumes in the acclaimed Word Biblical Commentary (WBC) Series.

Colossians & Philemon

  • Author: N.T. Wright
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 199

Colossians presents a picture of Christ who is “the firstborn over all creation” and has disarmed and triumphed over the powers and authorities. The letter also appeals to its readers to seek humble maturity, a maturity not possible apart from the person and work of Jesus Christ. N. T Wright’s stated goal is to “to give the text back to the reader uncluttered by a mass of glosses.” In Philemon, Paul makes a personal appeal to a fellow believer to receive a runaway slave, Onesimus, in love and forgiveness. For Wright, it is “an acted parable of the gospel itself.”

Nicholas Tom Wright, commonly known as N. T. Wright or Tom Wright, is the bishop of Durham and an important scholar of the New Testament. He has researched, taught, and lectured on the New Testament at McGill, Oxford, and Cambridge Universities, and has been named by Christianity Today as one of the top five theologians in the world. He is best known for his scholarly contributions to the historical study of Jesus and the New Perspective on Paul. His work interacts with the positions of James Dunn, E.P. Sanders, Marcus Borg, and Rowan Williams, the Archbishop of Canterbury. Wright has written and lectured extensively around the world, authoring more than forty books and numerous articles in scholarly journals and popular periodicals. He is best known for his Christian Origins and the Question of God Series, of which four of the anticipated six volumes are finished.

1 & 2 Thessalonians

  • Author: Leon Morris
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 148

The apostle Paul’s correspondence with the church at Thessalonica provides a valuable glimpse into issues confronting the community. Was Paul merely exploiting them for money? When will Christ return? What about those members who had already died? Would they receive Christ’s blessings when he came again? As Leon Morris deploys his characteristic knowledge and wisdom in interpreting these two letters, he not only illuminates their original meaning and context but also shows how they bear on the church today.

The late Leon Morris was Principal of Ridley College, Melbourne, Australia. He contributed to the Pillar New Testament Commentary (8 vols.) with his volumes on The Gospel according to Matthew and The Epistle to the Romans.

The Pastoral Epistles

  • Author: Douglas Guthrie
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 251

In his letters to Timothy and Titus, the apostle Paul is concerned with church order, defending correct doctrine and passing on the faith. Donald Guthrie’s introduction to the volume, along with a helpful appendix, provides a strong defence of Pauline authorship of the Pastoral Epistles, setting them in the distinct historical context of Paul’s later ministry. Guthrie’s commentary bears out the idea of faith seeking understanding: he has drunk deeply from the pastoral wisdom in these letters, and in turn he offers us a deeper understanding of Paul’s message to the church.

The late Donald Guthrie was Vice-Principal and Lecturer in New Testament at London Bible College. His widely acclaimed reference work, New Testament Introduction is available for Logos.

Hebrews

  • Author: Donald Guthrie
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 281

Many aspects of the letter to the Hebrews are a mystery. Who wrote it? To whom? When? Under what conditions? Though the answers to these questions largely remain an enigma, the letter’s place in the biblical canon stands as a testament to its inherent power and authority as a treatise on the nature of Jesus Christ. As such, Donald Guthrie skilfully situates the message of Hebrews in the space where the study of the New Testament meets the reality of the Christian life.

The late Donald Guthrie was Vice-Principal and Lecturer in New Testament at London Bible College. His widely acclaimed reference work, New Testament Introduction is available for Logos.

James

  • Author: Douglas Moo
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 196

“The Bible is being translated, commented on, read, studied, preached and analyzed as never before. But it is questionable whether it is being obeyed to a comparable degree,” says Douglas Moo in the preface to his commentary on James. “All this suggests that the message of James is one that we all need to hear--and obey. No profound theologian, James’ genius lied in his profound moral earnestness; in his powerfully simple call for repentance, for action, for a consistent Christian lifestyle. His words need to thrust through our theological debates, our personal preconceptions, our spiritual malaise and set us back on the road to a biblical, invigorating, transforming Christianity.”

Douglas J. Moo is Professor of New Testament, Wheaton College Graduate School. Among his many books and Commentaries, his writings are included both in the Pillar New Testament Commentary Series (PNTC), and The New International Commentary on the New Testament (NICNT) series.

James

  • Author: Douglas J. Moo
  • Edition: Revised
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 196

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The letter of James has often been defined in terms of moral earnestness, repentance and consistent social action, leading many to argue that it is not theological. This separation between theology and practice, Douglas J. Moo observes, can all too easily lead people to read Scripture as a book to be analyzed rather than a message to be obeyed - the very mindset against which James inveighs. Moo’s exposition of these themes illuminates James’s rich letter and its message for us today.

In this newly revised edition, Moo draws from important books and articles on James that have been published in the 30 years since the publication of the first edition to “tweak” some of his original interpretive conclusions.

The sixteenth volume in the acclaimed Tyndale New Testament Commentary series, James: Revised Edition is a masterpiece of theological scholarship and very highly recommended for personal, community, church, seminary, and academic library New Testament studies reference collections and supplemental studies reading lists.

—John Taylor, The Midwest Book Review, August 2015

Douglas J. Moo (PhD, University of St. Andrews) is the Kenneth T. Wessner Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College Graduate School. He has written numerous New Testament commentaries for the NIV Application Commentary series and the Tyndale New Testament Commentary series, specifically on the Pauline and general letters. Since 2006, he has chaired the Committee on Bible Translation, the group of scholars charged with revising the text of the NIV, and is the coauthor of The Rapture: Pre-, Mid-, or Post-Tribulational? and The Law, the Gospel, and the Modern Christian: Five Views.

1 Peter

  • Author: Wayne Grudem
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 239

In 1 Peter, explains Wayne Grudem, readers are encouraged to grow in their trust in God and their obedience to him throughout their lives, but especially when they suffer. “Here is a brief and very clear summary both of the consolations and instructions needful for the encouragement and direction of a Christian in his journey to Heaven, elevating his thoughts and desires to that happiness, and strengthening him against all opposition in the way, both that of corruption within, and temptations and afflictions from without,” says Archbishop Robert Leighton in the introduction.

Wayne A. Grudem became Research Professor of Bible and Theology at Phoenix Seminary in 2001, after teaching at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School for 20 years. He has served as president of the Council for Biblical Manhood and Womanhood, as president of the Evangelical Theological Society (1999), and as a member of the Translation Oversight Committee for the English Standard Version of the Bible. He has written more than 60 articles for both popular and academic journals, and his books include: Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine, The Gift of Prophecy in the New Testament and Today, Pastoral Leadership for Manhood and Womanhood, and Business for the Glory of God. He has also coedited Recovering Biblical Manhood and Womanhood: A response to Evangelical Feminism and edited Are Miraculous Gifts for Today? Four Views.

2 Peter & Jude

  • Author: Michael Green
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 208

The Second Letter of Peter and the Letter of Jude both address false teaching—teaching that affects behaviour. The recipients had within their midst people whose lives contradicted the gospel that was preached. They defiled the love-feasts; they were themselves immoral and minimized the importance of law in the Christian life. They scoffed at the parousia and were fond of their own rhetoric. Michael Green offers a penetrating analysis that sets both letters in their historical context and shows their relevance to life today.

Michael Green is Chaplain for the Oxford Centre for Christian Apologetics, and was for many years a senior research fellow at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford.

The Letters of John

  • Author: John R. W. Stott
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 234

“John evidently loves the people committed to his care,” says John Stott in the preface to this commentary on 1, 2 and 3 John. “They are his ‘dear children,’ his ‘dear friends.’ He longs to protect them from both error and evil and to see them firmly established in faith, love and holiness. He has no new doctrine for them. On the contrary, he appeals to them to remember what they already know, have and are. He warns them against deviating from this and urges them to remain loyal to it. Whenever innovators trouble the church, and ridicule whatever is old or traditional, we need to hear and heed John’s exhortation, to continue in what we have learned and received, and to let it continue in us.”

John R. W. Stott is Rector Emeritus of All Souls Church, Langham Place, London.

Revelation

  • Author: Leon Morris
  • Series: Tyndale Commentaries
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 256

Throughout the centuries the book of Revelation has been subjected to wildly different interpretations. Why? “Its symbolism belongs to the first century, not to our own age,” says Leon Morris in the preface to his commentary. Here he explains the ancient metaphors and symbols—most important, a slain lamb—in ways that demonstrate their compelling significance for the church today.

The late Leon Morris was Principal of Ridley College, Melbourne, Australia. He contributed to the Pillar New Testament Commentary (8 vols.) with his volumes on The Gospel according to Matthew and The Epistle to the Romans.

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