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Church History: Intermediate Certificate Program

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Overview

In the Church History: Foundational Certificate Program you’ll build a deeper understanding of the history of the Christian church. You’ll study the theological developments of the early church and the patristic era, key milestones of the Protestant Reformation with a special focus on the history and theology Martin Luther and John Calvin, and the background to and movements of American church history. These courses will help you understand Christianity’s development and growth.

How to Apply for a Mobile Ed Certificate of Completion

  1. Complete all Mobile Ed courses in this certificate program. This involves viewing all videos and taking all quizzes.
  2. Write a 750-word response on any topic covered for each course in the certificate program. Post your response to the appropriate Faithlife group in the comments section. Search course code here to find group.
  3. Email certificate@faithlife.com once you have completed all videos and quizzes and have posted responses in the appropriate Faithlife group for each Mobile Ed course in the certificate program. Please include your full name, title of completed certificate program, and links for each Faithlife group post in your email.
  4. Our certificate program team will review the application and email the Certificate of Completion once you have completed all requirements. Please allow 7–10 business days for review.

Product Details

  • Title: Church History: Intermediate Certificate Program
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Product Type: Logos Mobile Education
  • Resource Type: Courseware, including transcripts, audio, and video resources
  • Courses: 9
  • Video Hours: 62

CH101 Introducing Church History I: Obscurity to Christendom

  • Instructor: Frank A. James III
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 6

Beginning with the aftermath of Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection, CH101 covers the story of Christianity up to the 15th century. Dr. James unravels the distinct thought and persecution of the early Christians, as well as the key historical turning points that would result in the formation of doctrines such as the doctrine of Christ, the Holy Spirit, and the Trinity.

This course introduces you to the important work of Augustine, who responded to the Donatists and Pelagius in a way that would have lasting marks on the church. Dr. James traces the historical context of the rise of the papacy; the violence of the first Crusades and their lingering effects; and the rise of medieval scholasticism, particularly in the work of Thomas Aquinas. This course concludes with an explanation of the Great Schism of the 14th century and the early reform attempts by John Wycliffe and Jan Hus, which paved the way for the Protestant Reformation.

Contents:

  • Contours of the Early Church
  • Persecution of the Early Church
  • Theological Divisions in the Early Church
  • Theological Turning Points: NT Canon, Marcion, the Trinity and Chalcedon
  • Augustine’s Life and Work (against Donatism and Pelagianism)
  • Rise of the Papacy
  • Crusades
  • Medieval Scholasticism
  • Thomas Aquinas
  • Late Medieval Maelstrom: The Great Schism and Early Reform Attempts

Dr. Frank A. James III brings his passion for understanding Christian faith throughout history, combined with 30 years of research and teaching experience, to bear on this two-course Church History bundle. With doctoral degrees in both theology and history, Dr. James is uniquely poised to help you better understand and trace the arc of Christian thought from its earliest days to its 21st century global presence.

Dr. James is president of Biblical Theological Seminary in the Philadelphia suburb of Hatfield, PA. Prior to taking his current post, he taught and served as president at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, FL, and served as provost and taught at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, MA. Additionally, he has been on the teaching faculties of Villanova University and Westmont College, and was a visiting professor at the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Oxford University.

A Texas native, Dr. James holds a DPhil in history from Oxford University and a PhD in theology from Westminster Theological Seminary. He is married to author Carolyn Custis James.

CH102 Introducing Church History II: Reformation to Postmodernism

  • Instructor: Frank A. James III
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 7

If you’ve ever wished you knew more about the events of the Protestant Reformation and how the Reformation produced the contemporary Protestant church, CH102 is for you. This course dispels popular misconceptions of Martin Luther’s intentions, and it provides a close look at Luther’s call from God which led him out of the monastery, his teaching on sola fide, and his eventual excommunication. Dr. James teaches you how to distinguish between Luther, the Swiss Reformers (including John Calvin, the “accidental reformer”), and the so-called Radical Reformers. He also provides a helpful explanation of the Council of Trent, the formation of the Jesuits, and the Catholic Counter-Reformation.

Dr. James then helps you navigate the historical and theological developments that led to Arminianism, English Puritanism, and Puritanism in New England. Learn how the spiritual decline in England led to John Wesley’s Methodism, the English Revival, and the Great Awakening in America, and get an in-depth look at Christianity in the modern era. After this course, you will be able to articulate how even through all of the twists and turns of the past 2,000 years, God is still working in the modern church.

Contents:

  • Luther’s Reformation
  • The Swiss Reformation
  • Radical Reformation
  • Catholic Counter-Reformation
  • Arminianism
  • English Puritanism: Context and Cause
  • New England Puritanism
  • Methodism: John Wesley, English Spiritual Decline, and Moravian Influence
  • The Great Awakening
  • The Modern Church
  • Protestant Liberalism
  • Liberation Theologies
  • Black and Feminist Theologies
  • American Evangelicalism and Neo-Evangelicalism
  • The Rise of Global Pentecostalism

Dr. Frank A. James III brings his passion for understanding Christian faith throughout history, combined with 30 years of research and teaching experience, to bear on this two-course Church History bundle. With doctoral degrees in both theology and history, Dr. James is uniquely poised to help you better understand and trace the arc of Christian thought from its earliest days to its 21st century global presence.

Dr. James is president of Biblical Theological Seminary in the Philadelphia suburb of Hatfield, PA. Prior to taking his current post, he taught and served as president at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, FL, and served as provost and taught at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, MA. Additionally, he has been on the teaching faculties of Villanova University and Westmont College, and was a visiting professor at the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Oxford University.

A Texas native, Dr. James holds a DPhil in history from Oxford University and a PhD in theology from Westminster Theological Seminary. He is married to author Carolyn Custis James.

CH151 Introducing Historical Theology I: Apostles to the Reformation

  • Instructor: Roger Olson
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 6

In this course, you’ll learn about the first 1,500 years of Christian history, focusing especially on the development of Christian doctrine. Instructor Roger Olson expands on doctrines such as the Trinity and Christ’s hypostatic union—doctrines that most Christians are aware of, but may never have studied at length. The Middle Ages are covered, particularly highlighting the way that medieval theologians understood the knowledge of God and the relationship between faith and reason. The course ends with the Renaissance—a period during which there were initial calls for reform within the church—and early church reformers who came before the theology of Martin Luther.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Establishing the Roots of Theology
  • What Is Theology?
  • The Definition and Purpose of Historical Theology
  • Theology in the New Testament and Early Church
  • Heresies in Early Christianity
  • Challenges for Theology in Early Christianity
  • The Beginnings of Theology in the Apostolic Fathers
  • The Role of Christian Apologists in Early Christianity
Unit 2: Theology in the Post-Apostolic Church
  • Irenaeus: The First Christian Systematic Theologian
  • Irenaeus: Defending the Incarnation within the Doctrine of Salvation
  • Clement of Alexandria: Theologian and Philosopher
  • Origen of Alexandria: A Speculative Christian Theologian
  • Tertullian: The Father of Latin Christian Theology
  • Tertullian: Influence on Christian Doctrine
  • The Changing Landscape of Theology in the Early Church
  • Cyprian of Carthage: Catholic Theologian and Bishop
  • The Development of the Christian Canon of Scripture
Unit 3: Theology in the Christian Roman Empire
  • Constantine and the Rise of Christendom
  • The Arian Controversy
  • The Trinitarian Controversy and the Council of Nicaea
  • The Christological Controversy: Jesus as Both Human and Divine
  • Heresies Addressed by the Third and Fourth Ecumenical Councils
  • Christian Orthodoxy: The Trinity and the Hypostatic Union
  • Augustine: The Father of Western Christianity
  • Augustine’s Core Beliefs
  • The Impact of Augustine’s View of Predestination on Church History
Unit 4: The Deepening Divide between the East and the West
  • Gregory the Great: Foundation of Roman Catholic Theology
  • The Gradual Separation of the Greek Orthodox from the Roman Catholics
  • Controversies in the Eastern Orthodox Church
  • Filioqueand the Great Schism
  • The Eastern Orthodox View of Filioque
Unit 5: Theology in the High Middle Ages
  • Scholasticism and Anselm of Canterbury
  • Scholasticism and Thomas Aquinas
  • Atonement Theology and Anselm’s Response
  • Moral Influence Theory: The Atonement Theology of Peter Abelard
  • Philosophy and Theology in Medieval Christian Universities
  • The Impact of Saint Francis of Assisi
  • The Power Struggles Which Laid the Groundwork for the Reformation
  • Scholastic Theologians: Duns Scotus and William of Ockham
  • Medieval Catholic Dogmas and Councils
Unit 6: Renaissance Theology
  • Christian and Secular Humanism
  • The Life of Erasmus: Christian Humanist
  • Peter Waldo and the First Protestants
  • Catherine of Siena and Catholic Mysticism
  • John Wycliffe: The Morning Star of the Reformation
  • Jan Hus: Forerunner to Martin Luther
  • The Catholic Church on the Eve of the Reformation
Conclusion
  • Concluding the Course

Roger E. Olson is the Foy Valentine Professor of Christian Theology and Ethics at Baylor University's George W. Truett Theological Seminary. Previously he served as professor of theology at Bethel University in Minnesota. He is the author of eighteen books including The Journey of Modern Theology: From Reconstruction to Deconstruction (Intervarsity Press). Dr. Olson was born and raised in the Upper Midwest of the United States and considers himself a "Bapticostal." He grew up Pentecostal but became Baptist while attending North American Baptist Seminary. His PhD in Religious Studies is from Rice University (Houston, Texas) and he studied at the University of Munich with theologian Wolfhart Pannenberg. He served as editor of Christian Scholar's Review in the 1990s and has served as consulting and contributing editor for Christianity Today. He is married and has two adult daughters and two beautiful grandchildren. He enjoys Southern gospel music, Victorian gothic mystery books, and traveling.

CH152 Introducing Historical Theology II: Luther to the Twenty-First Century

  • Instructor: Roger Olson
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 6

In this course, you’ll begin by studying the Catholic church and its theology on the cusp of the Protestant Reformation, setting the stage for the work of Luther, Calvin, and other Protestant Reformers. You’ll continue on to study the post-Reformation period and various Christian movements such as Pietism, Puritanism, and Methodism. A study of modernity, beginning with the Enlightenment and the scientific revolutions, introduces the advent of liberal theology and the response of conservative theologians to the challenges of modernity. The course ends with a study of the postmodernity—its meaning, and the variety of ways that Christian theologians have responded to postmodern thought.

Contents:

  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Sixteenth-Century Reformation
  • Roman Catholic Theology on the Eve of the Reformation
  • Luther and the Beginnings of Protestant Theology
  • The Doctrinal Views of Luther
  • Zwingli, Calvin, and Reformed Theology
  • Key Views of Reformed Theology
  • The Radical Reformers
  • The English Reformation and Anglican Theology
  • Counter-Reformation and the Council of Trent
  • The Scottish Reformation and Puritanism
Unit 2: Aftermath of the Reformation
  • Protestant Scholasticism and Confessionalism
  • Arminius and the Remonstrant Controversy
  • Puritan Theology and Jonathan Edwards
  • Pietism
  • Wesley and Methodism
  • Deism and Natural Religion
  • Beginnings of Baptist Theology
Unit 3: Theology in Relation to Modernity
  • The Enlightenment: Science and Theology
  • The Enlightenment: Philosophy and Theology
  • Friedrich Schleiermacher and Liberal Theology
  • Charles Hodge and Conservative Theology
  • Roman Catholic Modernism
  • Mediating Theology
Unit 4: Early Twentieth-Century Movements
  • Fundamentalism
  • The Social Gospel
  • Karl Barth and Dialectical Theology
  • Reinhold Niebuhr and Christian Realism
  • Existentialist Theology
  • Process Theology
  • Religionless Christianity and the Death of God Theology
  • Theology of Hope
Unit 5: Late Twentieth-Century Movements
  • New Approaches to Roman Catholicism
  • Theologies of Liberation
  • Evangelical Theologies
  • Renaissance of the Doctrine of the Trinity
Unit 6: Postmodern Movements
  • Development of Postmodernity
  • Deconstructionism
  • Postliberal Theology
  • Stanley Hauerwas and Postmodernity
  • The Global South
Conclusion
  • Concluding the Course

Roger E. Olson is the Foy Valentine Professor of Christian Theology and Ethics at Baylor University's George W. Truett Theological Seminary. Previously he served as professor of theology at Bethel University in Minnesota. He is the author of eighteen books including The Journey of Modern Theology: From Reconstruction to Deconstruction (Intervarsity Press). Dr. Olson was born and raised in the Upper Midwest of the United States and considers himself a "Bapticostal." He grew up Pentecostal but became Baptist while attending North American Baptist Seminary. His PhD in Religious Studies is from Rice University (Houston, Texas) and he studied at the University of Munich with theologian Wolfhart Pannenberg. He served as editor of Christian Scholar's Review in the 1990s and has served as consulting and contributing editor for Christianity Today. He is married and has two adult daughters and two beautiful grandchildren. He enjoys Southern gospel music, Victorian gothic mystery books, and traveling.

CS201 Western Civilization: Greeks to Aquinas

  • Instructor: Bryan Litfin
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Video Hours: 8

Survey over 1,200 years of western civilization with Dr. Bryan Litfin—theologian, historian, and acclaimed author. Hear about the trials and triumphs of the church throughout the most pivotal stages of western civilization, from the spread of Hellenism, to the fall of Rome and the rise of Europe. Find out how the church established the canon of scripture and developed the early creeds. Gain insight into why the church met in councils and how they defined doctrines like the nature of Jesus Christ and the Trinity. Discover how Christianity influenced western culture, as well as how western culture influenced Christianity—in politics, art and architecture, and education. Finally, learn about the role of the papacy in religious reform and how the crusades related to the emergence of Islam.

Dr. Litfin combines his research in the early church, cultural studies, and historical doctrine into this unique eight-hour course, designed for Mobile Ed.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Introduction: A Christian View of History
  • The Concept of “Catholicity”
  • The Methods of Historical Inquiry: How Do We Do History?
Unit 2: Background of the Early Church: Judaism
  • Monotheism
  • Jewish History to the Time of Jesus
  • Key Aspects of First-Century Judaism
  • Using Ratings and Collections to Search for Key Terms
Unit 3: Background of the Early Church: The Greeks
  • The Classical Era
  • Alexander and His Conquests
  • Features of Hellenism
Unit 4: Background of the Early Church: The Romans
  • Rome and the Early Church: Friends or Foes?
  • A Brief Survey of Roman History
  • Aspects of Roman Culture Conducive to the Gospel
  • Using Search Operators to Find Information about Roman Travel
Unit 5: The Birth of Christianity
  • Key Ideas of the “Orthodox” Church
  • The Myth of Early Universal Orthodoxy
  • The Myth of Radical Diversity
  • How Orthodoxy Was Formed
Unit 6: Judaism and the Early Church
  • Hebrews, Hellenists, and Heretical Sects
  • James and the Jerusalem Church
  • Understanding and Using the Referent Database
  • The Church versus the Synagogue
Unit 7: Strategies to Achieve Catholicity
  • The Monepiscopacy
  • Using Louw-Nida Numbers to Research Church Leadership
  • The Canon of Scripture
  • The Creeds of the Ancient Church
Unit 8: Persecution in the Early Church
  • The Reasons behind Persecution
  • The Roman Imperial Cult
  • Historical Stages of Persecution
  • Using the Timeline to Look Up Persecution in Church History
Unit 9: Imperial Christianity
  • The Rise of Constantine
  • Two Important Successors to Constantine
  • The Imperial Theology of Eusebius
Unit 10: The Council of Nicaea
  • The Theology of Arius
  • Nicene Trinitarianism
Unit 11: Early Christian Art and Architecture
  • The Catacombs
  • Finding Images of the Catacombs and Storing Them in Favorites
  • Types of Early Christian Art
  • Triumphal Art after Constantine
  • Early Christian Buildings
Unit 12: Augustine of Hippo
  • Augustine’s Life
  • Augustine’s View of History
  • Using Notes to Track Augustine’s View of the Two Cities
  • Augustine’s Legacy for Western Civilization
Unit 13: The Council of Chalcedon
  • Heretical Christologies
  • The Alexandrians and the Antiochians
  • Chalcedon and Its Aftermath
Unit 14: Early Christian Monasticism
  • Antecedents of Early Christian Monasticism
  • The Historical Motive
  • Finding Information on the Origins of Monasticism
  • Key Figures in Early Christian Monasticism
Unit 15: Christian Mission
  • Alternate Christian Expressions
  • Early Missionary Efforts
Unit 16: The Byzantine World
  • Constantine and His City
  • The Splendor of Justinian
  • Conversion of the Slavs
  • Eastern Orthodox Distinctives
Unit 17: The Fall of Rome
  • Historical Explanations
  • The Barbarian Invasions
  • New Alliances for the Church
Unit 18: The Rise of the Papacy
  • Apostolic Succession
  • The Prestige of Rome
  • Theology of the Papacy
  • Using the Clause Search to Explore the Relationship between Jesus and Peter
  • Key Figures in the Development of the Papacy
Unit 19: British and Celtic Christianity
  • Early History of the British Isles
  • Christianity in Britain
  • The Celtic Church
  • The Anglo-Saxons
Unit 20: The Birth of Europe
  • Political Structures
  • Religious Beliefs and Practices
  • Cultural Institutions
  • Using the Sermon Starter Guide to Find a Biblical Perspective on War
Unit 21: Charlemagne and the Carolingian Renaissance
  • Rise of the Carolingians out of the Dark Ages
  • Rebirth under Charlemagne
  • The Holy Roman Empire
  • The Viking Invasions
Unit 22: The High Middle Ages
  • Reforms of Gregory VII
  • Lay Investiture Controversy
  • Romanesque and Gothic Architectural Styles
  • The Great Schism
Unit 23: Life in Medieval Christendom
  • William the Conqueror
  • Norman Castles
  • Thomas Becket and the “Murder in the Cathedral”
  • Pope Innocent III
Unit 24: The Crusades
  • Interpretation and Motivations
  • Historical Context: The Rise of Islam
  • The First Crusade
  • Results of the Crusades
Unit 25: Medieval Intellectualism
  • Two Important Intellectual Leaders: Alcuin and Anselm
  • New Monastic Orders: Cistercians, Dominicans, and Franciscans
  • Rise of the Universities
  • Scholasticism and Thomas Aquinas
Conclusion
  • Conclusion to the Course

Dr. Bryan M. Litfin professor of theology at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, teaches courses in theology, church history, and Western civilization from ancient and medieval periods. He is the author of Early Christian Martyr Stories: An Evangelical Introduction with New Translations and Getting to Know the Church Fathers: An Evangelical Introduction as well as several scholarly articles and essays.

CH221 Milestones of the Protestant Reformation

  • Instructor: Jennifer Powell McNutt
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 4

Discover a selection of milestone moments in history that have introduced you to the events, figures, and ideas of the Protestant Reformation. From reformation precursors to the exploration of Erasmus’ publication of the Greek NT, Luther’s posting of the 95 Theses and his translation of the NT. We’ve explored the “radical reformations revolution and re-baptism” and how the Turkish invasion of Europe had an impact on the Protestant Reformation. Delve into “the meeting of Protestants and Catholics at the Colloquy of Regensburg” and the issuing of the Peace of Augsburg. Gain a better understanding of the church today through the church of the past.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Precursors to the Protestant Reformation
  • Conceptualizing the Protestant Reformation
  • Key Events Leading Up to the Protestant Reformation
  • Key People Leading Up to the Protestant Reformation
Unit 2: The Contribution of Renaissance Humanism
  • No Humanism, No Reformation
  • Humanism and the Printing Press
  • The Egg that Luther Hatched: Part 1
  • The Egg that Luther Hatched: Part 2
Unit 3: Martin Luther and the Ninety-Five Theses
  • An Obscure Monk and an Ordinary Event
  • Scholasticism in the Rearview Mirror
  • The Instigating Event
  • The Content of the Ninety-Five Theses
Unit 4: Martin Luther and the Forgotten Bible
  • The Last Voice
  • The Game Changer: Frederick of Saxony
  • Scripture Gains Primacy
  • The Diet of Worms
  • The September Bible Unleashed
Unit 5: The Radical Reformation
  • The Stepchild of the Reformation
  • The Peasants’ New Revolt
  • The Swiss Brethren’s Radicalization of Baptism: Part 1
  • The Swiss Brethren’s Radicalization of Baptism: Part 2
  • The Struggle for Separation: Part 1
  • The Struggle for Separation: Part 2
Unit 6: The Turkish Empire and the Protestant Reformation
  • The Threat to Western Christendom
  • A Potential Ally
  • The Rhetorical Turk
Unit 7: The Marburg Colloquy
  • Leading Up to Marburg
  • The Marburg Articles
  • Eucharistic Theology: Agreement and Disagreement
  • The Implications of Marburg
Unit 8: John Calvin: The Second-Wave Reformer
  • Passing the Baton
  • The Frenchman’s Journey to Geneva: Part 1
  • The Frenchman’s Journey to Geneva: Part 2
  • A Pastor Emerges
  • The Institutes of the Christian Religion
Unit 9: Settling the Protestant Question
  • A Slow Response
  • The SpiritualiGain Prominence
  • The Colloquy of Regensburg
Unit 10: The Diversification of Western Christianity
  • Who Has the Authority?
  • The Peace of Augsburg
Unit 11: Queen Elizabeth and the Church of England
  • The Half Reformation
  • The Mother of the Church of England
Unit : Conclusion
  • A Mere Introduction

CH241 The History of Christianity in the United States

  • Instructor: Chris Armstrong
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 10

In The History of Christianity in the United States, Chris Armstrong provides an introduction to the major movements, ideas, figures, and events in American church history, from colonization to recent decades. See how transplanted European churches took root, and American originals sprang up, over the course of five centuries of challenges and opportunities: early settlements, the expansion of the frontier, wars of independence and unification, slavery, immigration, intellectual challenges to the faith, and the new political and social realities of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Learn how the church reinvented and reaffirmed its central identity in the face of these social changes, and discover the implications of American church history for Christian life and ministry in today’s culture.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: European and Reformation Backgrounds
  • European Roots
  • Convictions of Early Protestants
  • The Word and the Reformed Tradition
  • Key Elements of the Reformed Tradition
  • The Purity of the Church
Unit 2: The English Reformation and the Roots of Puritanism
  • Introduction to the English Reformation
  • Two English Queens
  • Church Order in the Anglican and Presbyterian Traditions
  • Church Order in the Congregational Tradition
  • The Formation of Puritanism
  • The Failure of Puritanism in England
  • Introduction to American Puritanism
  • The Puritan Trajectory
Unit 3: Puritanism in America
  • The Puritan Dream
  • Key Themes in Puritan Thought
  • The Puritans’ Application of Covenant Theology
  • Reasons for the Puritan Decline
  • The Salem Witch Trials and the Halfway Covenant
  • The Puritan Legacy
Unit 4: The First Great Awakening
  • An Introduction to the Great Awakening
  • Traits of Evangelicals
  • The Progress of the Awakening
  • Heart Religion
  • Misunderstanding the Movement
  • The Evangelical Impulse for Social Reform
  • George Whitefield
  • Results of the Awakening
Unit 5: The Revolutionary Period
  • Religious Factors in the Revolution
  • Thomas Paine and the Language of Revolution
  • Involvement in the Revolution: Puritans and Anglicans
  • Involvement in the Revolution: Baptists, Methodists, and Presbyterians
  • Involvement in the Revolution: Catholics and Pacifists
Unit 6: Deism
  • An Enlightenment Worldview
  • Deism and the Founding Fathers: Thomas Paine
  • Deism and the Founding Fathers: Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson
  • Deism and the Founding Fathers: Conclusion
Unit 7: Catholicism
  • American Catholic History
  • Navigating a Protestant Context
  • Special Issues of an Immigrant Catholic Church
  • A History of Anti-Catholicism
  • Reasons for Anti-Catholicism
  • An Introduction to Americanism
  • The Irish Catholic Position on Americanism
  • The German Catholic Position on Americanism
  • Evaluating the Irish and German Positions on Americanism
Unit 8: The Church in the Early Republic
  • The Disestablishment of State Churches
  • The Rise of Religious Freedom
  • The First Amendment and the Public Role of Religion
  • Evangelicalism as a Radical Force
  • A Profile of Frontier Religious Groups
  • A Crisis of Authority
  • New Methods for a New Age
Unit 9: Social Reform
  • Charles Finney and the Birth of the Benevolent Empire
  • Aspects of Benevolent Reform
  • Other Benevolent Causes
  • The Benevolent Empire through the Civil War
  • Social Issues in the New Industrial Economy
  • Examples of Christian Social Action
  • Key Social Gospel Figures
  • Theological Dimensions of the Social Gospel
  • Twentieth-Century Developments
  • Assessing the Influence of the Social Gospel
Unit 10: Gender in Nineteenth-Century Christianity
  • Introduction to the Topic
  • Protestant Women and Ordination
  • The Changing Fortunes of Women Ministers
  • Roles of Women in the Church, 1860–1920
  • The Paradox of Conservative Feminism
  • Conclusion to the Topic
Unit 11: African-American Christianity
  • Black Christianity in America
  • Geographic Contexts of Slavery
  • The Apostolic Age of Black Christianity
  • The Slave Mission Period to Emancipation
  • Black Worship in the Time of Slavery
  • Black and White Spiritual Mutuality
  • Resources for Spiritual Mutuality
  • The Post-Emancipation Period and Historiographical Issues
  • Summary Thoughts on African-American Christianity
Unit 12: Holiness and Pentecostalism
  • Those Embarrassing Emotionalists
  • Pentecostalism’s Role in the History of American Evangelicalism
  • The History of the White Holiness Movement
  • The Map of Expected Spiritual Experiences
  • The Postbellum Holiness Movement
  • Black Holiness Groups
  • The Roots of Pentecostalism
  • The Development of Pentecostalism
  • Restorationism and the Pentecostal Hermeneutic
Unit 13: Fundamentalism
  • Introduction to Fundamentalism
  • Fundamentalist Roots in Protestant Orthodoxy
  • The Princeton Seminary Dynasty
  • The Early Decades of Fundamentalism
  • The Scopes Monkey Trial
  • Common Features of Fundamentalist Theology
Unit 14: From World War II to the Twenty-First Century
  • Introduction to Post-World War II Christianity
  • The Map of Post-War Religious Normalcy
  • Seekers
  • Ethnic Religious Communities
  • Religion in the Public Square
  • Final Reflections and Questions in American Church History
Conclusion
  • The History of Christianity in America

Dr. Chris Armstrongis the founding director of Opus: The Art of Work, a new institute at Wheaton College dedicated to understanding God’s call for work in the world. Prior to taking this post in 2014, he was director of Bethel Seminary’s Work with Purpose initiative while serving as a professor at Bethel. His training is in the field of American church history, and his areas of interest include religion and emotion; Christianity and literature; the holiness, Pentecostal, and charismatic movements; the Christ-and-culture conversation; and the “ancient–future” and “new monastic” movements within evangelicalism. He received his BA from St. Mary’s University in Nova Scotia (Canada), his MA from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, and his PhD from Duke University, where his research focused on the 19th-century holiness movement.

Dr. Armstrong wrote over 70 articles as the former managing editor of Christian History & Biography magazine, and he continues to contribute to Christian History & Biography and other publications, including Christianity Today and Leadership Journal. He has contributed chapters to Singing the Lord's Song in a Strange Land (edited by Mark A. Noll and Edith L. Blumhofer) and Portraits of a Generation: Early Pentecostal Leaders (edited by James R. Goff Jr. and Grant Wacker). Dr. Armstrong’s book, Patron Saints for Postmoderns, was published in 2009 by InterVarsity Press, and his forthcoming book, Getting Medieval: An Exploration with C. S. Lewis, will be published by Baker Academic.

CH201 Historical Theology: Patristic

  • Instructor: George Kalantzis
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Video Hours: 11

In Historical Theology: The Patristic Period (CH201) Dr. George Kalantzis provides an in-depth study of the theological developments of the early church during the patristic era. Beginning with the world of early Christianity, you will grasp the major historical events, the philosophical ideas, and the pagan religions that shaped the world into which the New Testament church was born. The course covers topics such as persecution and martyrdom, apologetics, Gnosticism, ecclesiology, Christology, and the Trinity in the context of the Roman Empire. Lastly, you will learn what religious, historical, and political influences gave rise to the ecumenical councils that produced the foundational summaries of the Christian faith.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: The World of Early Christianity
  • Why Study History & Key Developments of the First Six Centuries
  • The Unification of the Mediterranean World
  • The Maccabean Interlude
  • History of the Roman Empire
  • Geography of the Roman Empire
  • Social Organization in the Roman Empire: Part One
  • Social Organization in the Roman Empire: Part Two
  • Slavery in the Ancient World
  • Virtue and Humility
  • Platonic Thought
  • Mystical Theology and Aristotelian Thought
  • Roman Religion
  • Religion and the Imperial Cult
  • Graeco-Roman Attitudes toward Jews
  • Graeco-Roman Attitudes toward Christians
Unit 2: Persecution and Martyrdom
  • Causes of Christian Persecution
  • The First Persecutions under Nero and the First Jewish Revolt
  • The Second Persecutions under Domitian
  • The Church under the Antonines: Part One
  • The Church under the Antonines: Part Two
  • Ignatius of Antioch
  • The Martyrdom of Polycarp
  • The Martyrs of Lyons and Vienne
  • The Passion of Perpetua and Felicitas
Unit 3: Apologetics
  • Christian Apologetics
  • Justin Martyr
  • Christianization of Hellenism and Christian Defenses against Civil Charges and Mystery Religions
  • Christian Response to Non-Christian Myths and Philosophy
  • Marcus Aurelius and Celsus on Christianity
  • Two Kinds of Reason
Unit 4: Gnosticism
  • Origins of Gnosticism
  • Gnostic Basis on the Bible
  • Fundamental Tenets of Gnosticism
  • Gnostic Movements and Motifs of “Christian Gnosticism”
  • Marcion and Christian Gnosticism
  • Irenaeus and Gnosticism
  • The Self-Defining of the Early Church
  • The Rule of Faith
Unit 5: Monarchianism
  • Introduction to Monarchianism
  • Tertullian and Against Praxeas
  • The Self-Revelation of the Triune God
Unit 6: Ecclesiology and Church Order
  • The State of the Roman Empire
  • Emperor Decius’ Edict
  • Those Who Denied the Faith
  • Ecclesiology and the Doctrine of Penance
  • Sacramental Theology
Unit 7: Conversion of the Empire
  • An Imperial Chronology
  • The Great Persecution
  • Constantine’s Consolidation of the West
  • The End of the Great Persecution
  • Constantine and the Christological Controversies
  • Origen on the Trinity
  • The Arian Controversy
  • The Council of Nicaea
  • From Constantine to Theodosius
Unit 8: Christology and Trinity
  • Christological Formulas, Confessions, and Creeds
  • The Apostles’ Creed and the Nicene Creed
  • Christological Language: Part One
  • Christological Language: Part Two
  • Arianism after Nicaea
  • The Cappadocian Fathers: Basil the Great
  • The Cappadocian Fathers: Gregory of Nazianzus and Gregory of Nyssa
  • Trinitarian Language
  • Nestorius and Cyril: Part One
  • Nestorius and Cyril: Part Two
  • Eutyches and the Council of Chalcedon
Conclusion
  • Conclusion to the Course

Dr. George Kalantzis was born and raised by the shadow of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. He is Professor of Theology and Director of The Wheaton Center for Early Christian Studies at Wheaton College. His research and writing interests focus on the dynamic relationship between the written documents and their interpretation in early Christianity.

He is the author of Caesar and the Lamb: Early Christian Attitudes on War and Military Service, Theodore of Mopsuestia: Commentary on the Gospel of John, and numerous articles and essays on patristic thought. Dr. Kalantzis is also coeditor of Evangelicals and the Early Church: Recovery, Reform, Renewal; Life in the Spirit: Spiritual Formation in Theological Perspective; and The Sovereignty of God Debate. He is currently completing a project on wealth and poverty titled Crumbs from the Table: The Eucharist in the Life of the Church.

Dr. Kalantzis holds a BS in Neurophysiology from the University of Illinois at Chicago; an MS in Neurobiology and Neurosciences from Northeastern Illinois University; an MABS (Master of Biblical Studies degree) from Moody Graduate School; a MTS (master’s degree in Theological Studies) in Patristics from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary; and a PhD in Patristics and Classics from Northwestern University.

CH321 History and Theology of John Calvin

  • Instructor: R. Michael Allen
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Video Hours: 4

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