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Theology: Advanced Certificate Program

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Overview

In the Theology: Advanced Certificate Program you’ll comprehensively study the development of Christian doctrine and the categories of systematic theology, and you’ll learn from leading Christian thinkers about debated theological topics. In addition, you’ll explore theological anthropology and the question of what it means to be human; the relationship between gospel, culture, and theology in society; and the role of human context in doing theology.

TH261 Doctrine of Salvation is included in this product but is not yet available. It will automatically be added to your library when it ships.

How to Apply for a Mobile Ed Certificate of Completion

  1. Complete all Mobile Ed courses in this certificate program. This involves viewing all videos and taking all quizzes.
  2. Write a 750-word response on any topic covered for each course in the certificate program. Post your response to the appropriate Faithlife group in the comments section. Search course code here to find group.
  3. Email certificate@faithlife.com once you have completed all videos and quizzes and have posted responses in the appropriate Faithlife group for each Mobile Ed course in the certificate program. Please include your full name, title of completed certificate program, and links for each Faithlife group post in your email.
  4. Our certificate program team will review the application and email the Certificate of Completion once you have completed all requirements. Please allow 7–10 business days for review.
  • Title: Theology: Advanced Certificate Program
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Product Type: Logos Mobile Education
  • Resource Type: Courseware, including transcripts, audio, and video resources
  • Courses: 19
  • Video Hours: 110

TH101 Introducing Bible Doctrine I: Theology, Divine Revelation, and the Bible

  • Instructors: Michael S. Heiser, Ronn Johnson, and Carl Sanders
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Video Hours: 6

Learn what it means to “do theology” and how scholars and students integrate it into Bible study. This course introduces students to why systematic theology is important and what “doing theology” means. Drs. Ronn Johnson, Carl Sanders, and Mike Heiser challenge students to think about the roles of divine revelation, the Bible, Christian tradition, logic, and philosophy in articulating doctrine. Examine major topics, essential ideas, doctrinal issues and disagreements, and more.

Contents:

Unit 1: Prolegomena: What Is Theology?
  • The Starting Point of Theology
  • Types of Theology and Their Starting Points
  • What Is Evangelical Theology?
  • Looking Up Theological Terms in Logos
  • The Sources and Resources of Theology
  • Quiz – Unit 1
Unit 2: Why Theology? The Tasks and Limits of Theology
  • Why Theology?
  • The Importance of Theology
  • The Tasks and Limitations of Theology
  • Objections to Theology
  • Quiz – Unit 2
Unit 3: Tradition and Theology
  • Tradition Under Suspicion
  • Three Approaches to Tradition
  • Why Should We Value Tradition?
  • Creating a Collection for Creeds and Catechisms
  • Quiz – Unit 3
Unit 4: Theological Method: Introductory Suggestions
  • Doing Theology: The Simple Way
  • Using a Passage List to Study a Topic or Theme
  • Millard Erickson’s Theological Method
  • How to Do Theology
  • Using Logos Documents and Favorites to Organize Research
  • How to Organize a System
  • Theological Language
  • Quiz – Unit 4
Unit 5: Biblical and Systematic Theology
  • Introduction and History
  • Biblical Theology Defined
  • Systematic Theology Defined
  • Biblical or Systematic Theology? An Example
  • Quiz – Unit 5
Unit 6: Spiritual Preparation
  • The Intellectual Virtues and Theology
  • Preparation: Intellectual Virtue
  • Virtue Epistemology
  • Conclusion
  • Quiz – Unit 6
Unit 7: Postmodernism and Theology
  • Postmodernism
  • The Rise of Postmodernism
  • Responding to Radical Postmodernism
  • Quiz – Unit 7
  • Midterm Exam
Unit 8: The Doctrine of Revelation
  • Introduction to the Doctrine of Revelation
  • How Has God Spoken? Part 1
  • How Has God Spoken? Part 2
  • Is Revelation Moral?
  • What Are Our Challenges?
  • How Is the Bible Revelation?
  • Quiz – Unit 8
Unit 9: The Doctrine of Inspiration
  • Three Areas of Discussion
  • Inspiration: Misconceptions
  • Phenomena of the Text: Historical Record
  • Phenomena of the Text: Editing
  • Phenomena of the Text: Author’s Agendas/Memory
  • Finding Different Gospel Harmonies
  • Phenomena of the Text: Sources
  • Phenomena of the Text: Borrowed Material
  • Phenomena of the Text: Changing Content
  • Phenomena of the Text: Cultural Markers
  • Searching for Passages and Topics
  • Phenomena of the Text: Literary Structures
  • Highlighting Old Testament Genres with AFAT
  • Phenomena of the Text: Incomplete Content
  • Phenomena of the Text: Ancient Content
  • Understanding Original Language Words with Logos Guides and Tools
  • Phenomena of the Text: Offensive Content
  • Biblical Data for Inspiration
  • Using a Collection of Systematic Theologies to Define Inspiration
  • Applying the Data: Historical Record
  • Applying the Data: Editing
  • Applying the Data: Author’s Agendas/Memory
  • Applying the Data: Sources
  • Applying the Data: Borrowed Material
  • Applying the Data: Changing Content
  • Applying the Data: Cultural Markers
  • Applying the Data: Literary Structures
  • Applying the Data: Incomplete Content
  • Applying the Data: Ancient Content
  • Applying the Data: Offensive Content
  • Summary of the Doctrine of Inspiration
  • Quiz – Unit 9
Unit 10: Doctrine of the Bible: Inerrancy
  • Assumptions and Definitions
  • Researching Nonbiblical Topics in Logos
  • Difficulty of Definition
  • Four Important Areas to Understand
  • Transmission and Translation
  • Quiz – Unit 10
Unit 11: Doctrine of the Bible: Canon and Canonicity
  • Terminology and Orientation
  • Old Testament Canon
  • New Testament Canon
  • Concluding Thoughts on Canon
  • Quiz – Unit 11
  • Final Exam

Dr. Carl Sanders is an associate professor of theology at Lancaster Bible College’s Capital Bible Seminary. He has taught at college and seminary levels since 1999 at several schools: Bethel University (St. Paul, Minnesota), Northwestern College (St. Paul, Minnesota), and Washington Bible College in Washington, DC, where he also served as chair of the Bible and theology department (2003–2012).

Dr. Sanders is well liked by his students for his down-to-earth presentation of Bible doctrine. Students quickly learn that he enjoys talking about theology and has a quick wit. Among his strengths as a lecturer are his ability to distill information to essential elements, as well as his good-natured way of fairly explaining differences in theological positions. Dr. Sanders has a keen interest in urban ministry and has served for many years in racially diverse urban congregations. His interest in local-church experience helps him practice theology in ways that reflect the diversity present in the body of Christ. He strives to make theology interesting and practical.

Dr. Ronn Johnson, lecturer in biblical studies at the University of Northwestern St. Paul, Minnesota, has been the senior pastor at his church, Coon Rapids Evangelical Free, since 2006. He previously taught in the Bible departments at Pillsbury Baptist Bible College (1991–1994) and The Master’s College (1994–1996).

Dr. Johnson is well known by his students for demanding that they think about what they believe instead of being passive listeners. His approach is the opposite of proof-texting—simply quoting Bible verses without consideration of what they might mean in context. His goal is to drive home the point that the Bible is more than a collection of verses to be memorized and thrown into play—it’s a message from God that had a clear, coherent purpose that we need to hear without imposing our own traditions on the text. That approach of loyalty to the Bible above all else comes through in his Mobile Ed sessions on Bible doctrine.

He and his wife, Susan, have three teenage children. His pastimes include reading and giving too much attention to Kirby, the family dog.

Dr. Michael S. Heiser is a Scholar-in-Residence for Faithlife Corporation, the makers of Logos Bible Software. His varied academic background enables him to operate in the realm of critical scholarship and the wider Christian community. His experience in teaching at the undergraduate level and writing for the layperson both directly contribute to Logos’ goal of adapting scholarly tools for nonspecialists.

Dr. Heiser earned his PhD in Hebrew Bible and Semitic languages and holds and MA in ancient history and Hebrew studies. He is the coeditor of Old Testament Greek Pseudepigrapha with Morphology and Semitic Inscriptions: Analyzed Texts and English Translations, and can do translation work in roughly a dozen ancient languages, including Biblical Hebrew, Greek, Aramaic, Egyptian hieroglyphs, and Ugaritic cuneiform. He also specializes in Israelite religion (especially Israel’s divine council), contextualizing biblical theology with Israelite and ancient Near Eastern religion, Jewish binitarianism, biblical languages, ancient Semitic languages, textual criticism, comparative philology, and Second Temple period Jewish literature. In addition, he was named the 2007 Pacific Northwest Regional Scholar by the Society of Biblical Literature.

TH102 Introducing Bible Doctrine II: The Triune God and His Heavenly Host

  • Instructors: Carl Sanders and Ronn Johnson
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Video Hours: 6

Find answers to questions of Christian doctrine with experts in the field. Why do Christians believe in a Trinity? What is the relationship between God and angels? How does God relate to his creation? Why does evil exist? Drs. Ronn Johnson and Dr. Carl Sanders introduce students to the academic discussion of these questions by examining biblical descriptions of the Trinity and the members of God’s heavenly host. The course also discusses God’s providential relationship to creation, his divine knowledge, the problem of evil, and modern views of spiritual gifts.

Contents:

Unit 1: God
  • Introduction to the Doctrine of God
  • What We Don’t Mean
  • Finding the God of the Bible
  • Determining the Meaning of Elohim with the Bible Sense Lexicon
  • The Name of Our God
  • Identifying the Hebrew Names for God
  • God as Creator
  • God as Controller
  • God in Character
  • Quiz – Unit 1
Unit 2: Creation and Providence
  • Introduction to God’s Work
  • Creation
  • Creation Theology
  • Ethical Implications of Creation
  • Divine Providence: Preservation
  • The Dispute about God’s Rule
  • Total Control
  • Subject-Verb Clause Searching to Discover God’s Actions in Ruth
  • Partial Control
  • Open Theism
  • Openness Arguments
  • Performing a Bible Word Study for the Hebrew Term Nacham
  • Concerning Open Theism
  • Quiz – Unit 2
Unit 3: The Problem of Evil
  • The Problem Defined
  • Background of the Problem of Evil
  • Evil and Providence
  • Two Kinds of Evil
  • Approaches to the Problem of Evil
  • Conclusion: One Final Approach
  • Quiz – Unit 3
Unit 4: Angels
  • Introduction to Angels
  • Defining Angels
  • Searching the Old Testament for the Term “Angel”
  • Identifying Angels
  • Appreciating Angels
  • Quiz – Unit 4
  • Midterm Exam
Unit 5: Christology: The Person and Work of Christ
  • Introduction to the Doctrine of Christ
  • Background to Deity
  • The Deity of Christ
  • Implications of Deity
  • The Humanity of Christ
  • The United Person
  • Adding Verses to a Topic Guide Search
  • Implications of Humanity
  • The Work of Christ
  • Stages of Christ’s Work
  • Quiz – Unit 5
Unit 6: The Holy Spirit: Person and Work
  • Importance of the Holy Spirit
  • Overview of the History of the Holy Spirit
  • Personality of the Spirit
  • Deity of the Spirit
  • The Old Testament Work of the Holy Spirit
  • Searching for References to the Holy Spirit in the Old Testament
  • The Holy Spirit in the Life of Jesus
  • The Spirit and the Believer
  • Disputed Works of the Spirit
  • Quiz – Unit 6
Unit 7: THe Holy Spirit: Spirit Baptism
  • Spirit Baptism in Acts
  • What Is Spirit Baptism?
  • Searching the Words of Christ for References to the Holy Spirit
  • Paul and the Spirit
  • Quiz – Unit 7
Unit 8: Spiritual Gifts: The Contemporary Debate
  • Debates Surrounding Spiritual Gifts
  • Purpose of Spiritual Gifts
  • General Observations: 1 Corinthians 12–14
  • The Use of Charisma in Contemporary Greek Literature
  • Cessationism vs. Continuationism
  • The Cessationist Challenges
  • The Nature of Tongues: Issues
  • The Nature of Tongues: More Cessationist Arguments
  • Quiz – Unit 8
  • Final Exam

Dr. Carl Sanders is an associate professor of theology at Lancaster Bible College’s Capital Bible Seminary. He has taught at college and seminary levels since 1999 at several schools: Bethel University (St. Paul, Minnesota), Northwestern College (St. Paul, Minnesota), and Washington Bible College in Washington, DC, where he also served as chair of the Bible and theology department (2003–2012).

Dr. Sanders is well liked by his students for his down-to-earth presentation of Bible doctrine. Students quickly learn that he enjoys talking about theology and has a quick wit. Among his strengths as a lecturer are his ability to distill information to essential elements, as well as his good-natured way of fairly explaining differences in theological positions. Dr. Sanders has a keen interest in urban ministry and has served for many years in racially diverse urban congregations. His interest in local-church experience helps him practice theology in ways that reflect the diversity present in the body of Christ. He strives to make theology interesting and practical.

Dr. Ronn Johnson, lecturer in biblical studies at the University of Northwestern St. Paul, Minnesota, has been the senior pastor at his church, Coon Rapids Evangelical Free, since 2006. He previously taught in the Bible departments at Pillsbury Baptist Bible College (1991–1994) and The Master’s College (1994–1996).

Dr. Johnson is well known by his students for demanding that they think about what they believe instead of being passive listeners. His approach is the opposite of proof-texting—simply quoting Bible verses without consideration of what they might mean in context. His goal is to drive home the point that the Bible is more than a collection of verses to be memorized and thrown into play—it’s a message from God that had a clear, coherent purpose that we need to hear without imposing our own traditions on the text. That approach of loyalty to the Bible above all else comes through in his Mobile Ed sessions on Bible doctrine.

He and his wife, Susan, have three teenage children. His pastimes include reading and giving too much attention to Kirby, the family dog.

TH103 Introducing Bible Doctrine III: Humanity, Sin, and Salvation

  • Instructors: Carl Sanders and Ronn Johnson
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Video Hours: 9

In this course, Dr. Carl Sanders and Dr. Ronn Johnson discuss the theological importance of humanity’s creation in the image of God, separation from a relationship with God because of sin, biblical concepts of atonement and justification, and the ultimate destiny of believers. Theological approaches to related issues, such as corporate human relationships, gender, race, and the value of work are also considered.

Contents:

Unit 1: Humanity
  • Introducing the Doctrine of Humanity
  • The Image of God in Humankind
  • Studying the “Image of God” with the Sermon Starter Guide
  • The Awakening of Humankind
  • Human Connection and Disconnection
  • Human Freedom
  • Sin, Salvation, and Glorification
  • Quiz – Unit 1
Unit 2: Humanity: Individual and Corporate
  • The Biblical Idea of Corporate Humanity
  • Using the Bible Facts Tool to Find Connections
  • Practices of Corporate Humanity
  • Behaviors of Corporate Humanity
  • Corporate Humanity and Other Doctrines
  • Implications of Corporate Humanity
  • Using the Timeline Tool to Trace Slavery’s Effect on the Church
  • Quiz – Unit 2
Unit 3: Gender: Male and Female
  • Basic Issues to Thinking Theologically about Gender
  • Competing Christian Views on Gender
  • Creation and Gender Roles: Evidence for Hierarchy
  • The Impact of the Fall on Gender Roles
  • Jesus and Women
  • The New Testament Emphasis on Equality
  • New Testament Indications of Hierarchy
  • Using the Bible Sense Lexicon to Distinguish Meaning in the New Testament
  • Other Issues Related to a Theology of Gender
  • Quiz – Unit 3
Unit 4: Race
  • Historical Background and Biblical Ambiguity about Race
  • Racial Reconciliation
  • Multiracial Churches as a Christian Response
  • Multicultural Church Models
  • Quiz – Unit 4
Unit 5: Theology of Work
  • The Importance of a Theology of Work
  • Work in the Current Age
  • Vocation and Theology
  • Work and Sabbath
  • Quiz – Unit 5
  • Midterm Exam
Unit 6: Sin
  • The Doctrine of Sin
  • Comparing English Bibles and the Original Hebrew with the Grid View
  • The Effects of Sin
  • Are All Sins the Same?
  • Proximity Searching Using Old Testament Synonyms
  • Sins of Omission
  • Is Not Doing One’s Best a Sin?
  • Why Am I Tempted the Way I Am?
  • Will a Christian Ever Be Judged for Sins?
  • Quiz – Unit 6
Unit 7: Salvation
  • An Overview of Salvation
  • Salvation in the Old Testament
  • Salvation in the New Testament
  • The Results of Salvation
  • What Does a Person Do to Be Saved?
  • Researching Salvation in Acts with the Bible Word Study Tool
  • Can Christians Lose Their Salvation?
  • What Is the Logic behind the Concept of Hell?
  • Is There Only One Way of Salvation?
  • Quiz – Unit 7
Unit 8: Atonement
  • Introducing Atonement Theology
  • The English Word “Atonement”
  • The Old Testament Concept of Atonement
  • Introducing Modern Views of Atonement
  • Survey of Modern Views of Atonement
  • Quiz – Unit 8
Unit 9: Justification
  • Introducing the Doctrine of Justification
  • Creating a Passage List of Key Verses on Justification
  • The Doctrine of Justification
  • The Biblical Story of Justification
  • Defining Justification in the Context of the Old Testament
  • Modern Views of Justification
  • Quiz – Unit 9
Unit 10: Reformed and Wesleyan Traditions
  • Introducing the Two Traditions
  • Reformed Theology Versus Wesleyan Arminianism
  • Quiz – Unit 10
Unit 11: Deification
  • Introducing the Doctrine of Deification
  • The Doctrine of Deification
  • New Testament Hints on Becoming Like God
  • Searching for the Church Fathers’ Positions on “Deification”
  • The Old Testament Backdrop to the Concept of Deification
  • Summarizing the Doctrine of Deification
  • Quiz – Unit 11
Unit 12: Can Unsaved People Please God?
  • Why Ask This Question?
  • Defining Our Terms
  • Illustrating the Issue: King David
  • Illustrating the Issue: The Parable of the Wheat and Tares
  • Summarizing the Answer
  • Using Proximity Searches to Find Resources on Pleasing God
  • Quiz – Unit 12
  • Final Exam

Dr. Carl Sanders is an associate professor of theology at Lancaster Bible College’s Capital Bible Seminary. He has taught at college and seminary levels since 1999 at several schools: Bethel University (St. Paul, Minnesota), Northwestern College (St. Paul, Minnesota), and Washington Bible College in Washington, DC, where he also served as chair of the Bible and theology department (2003–2012).

Dr. Sanders is well liked by his students for his down-to-earth presentation of Bible doctrine. Students quickly learn that he enjoys talking about theology and has a quick wit. Among his strengths as a lecturer are his ability to distill information to essential elements, as well as his good-natured way of fairly explaining differences in theological positions. Dr. Sanders has a keen interest in urban ministry and has served for many years in racially diverse urban congregations. His interest in local-church experience helps him practice theology in ways that reflect the diversity present in the body of Christ. He strives to make theology interesting and practical.

Dr. Ronn Johnson, lecturer in biblical studies at the University of Northwestern St. Paul, Minnesota, has been the senior pastor at his church, Coon Rapids Evangelical Free, since 2006. He previously taught in the Bible departments at Pillsbury Baptist Bible College (1991–1994) and The Master’s College (1994–1996).

Dr. Johnson is well known by his students for demanding that they think about what they believe instead of being passive listeners. His approach is the opposite of proof-texting—simply quoting Bible verses without consideration of what they might mean in context. His goal is to drive home the point that the Bible is more than a collection of verses to be memorized and thrown into play—it’s a message from God that had a clear, coherent purpose that we need to hear without imposing our own traditions on the text. That approach of loyalty to the Bible above all else comes through in his Mobile Ed sessions on Bible doctrine.

He and his wife, Susan, have three teenage children. His pastimes include reading and giving too much attention to Kirby, the family dog.

TH104 Introducing Bible Doctrine IV: The Church and Last Things

  • Instructors: Carl Sanders and Ronn Johnson
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Video Hours: 6

Why was the church established after the resurrection of Jesus? What is its future, and the future of all humanity? Drs. Carl Sanders and Ronn Johnson introduce you to the theological discussion of the institution of the church and the biblical doctrine of eschatology (“end times”). Attention is focused on the nature of the church, systems of church government, church rites (baptism, Lord’s Supper), the relationship of the church to social issues, and how doctrinal thinking about the church affects one’s theology of end times. Various views on prophetic interpretation, the rapture, and millennialism are presented, as well as an extended discussion on how the two major theological approaches (dispensationalism and covenant theology) function and disagree.

Gain a wider view of several of the most important contemporary issues in the life of the church, with the guidance of experts in the field.

Contents:

Unit 1: Ecclesiology
  • The Problem of an Insufficient Ecclesiology
  • The Nature of the Church
  • Different Translations of the Greek Term Ekklēsia
  • The Marks of the Church
  • Church Government
  • Levels of Ministry in the New Testament
  • Looking Up Multiple Terms in a Single Text Using BDAG
  • Sacraments or Ordinances?
  • Introducing the Lord’s Supper
  • Using Multiple Resources to Research the Lord’s Supper
  • The Function and Meaning of Baptism
  • Developing a Sermon or Lesson on Baptism
  • Quiz – Unit 1
Unit 2: The Lord’s Supper
  • Some Introductory Matters
  • Survey of the Views on the Lord’s Supper
  • “Church-as-Body” View
  • Texts on the Lord’s Supper
  • Using Multiple Bible Dictionaries to Research the Passover
  • The Lord’s Supper in the Bible
  • The Meal at Corinth
  • The Body of Christ
  • Summary of the Lord’s Supper
  • Quiz – Unit 2
Unit 3: Social Justice
  • Historical Orientation to the Concept
  • Evangelical Interest in Social Justice
  • The Biblical Concept of Social Justice
  • Areas of Evangelical Debate about Social Justice
  • Unit 3 Quiz
Unit 4: Liberation Theology
  • Explanation of the Term
  • Themes of Liberation Theology
  • “Black Theology” of Liberation
  • Quiz – Unit 4
  • Midterm Exam
Unit 5: Eschatology
  • Terms and Introduction
  • Death
  • Judgment, Hell, and Heaven
  • Searching for All Terms Related to Hell
  • The Millennium
  • Finding Different Interpretations of Revelation 20:1–3
  • Cultural Influences on Eschatology
  • Introduction to the Tribulation
  • Dispensational Eschatology
  • Quiz – Unit 5
Unit 6: The Millennium
  • The Term and the Views
  • A Chart Comparison of the Different Millennium Perspectives
  • Premillennialism: Explanation
  • Premillennialism: Biblical Support
  • Premillennialism: Observations
  • Amillennialism: Explanation
  • Amillennialism: Biblical Arguments and Issues
  • Postmillennialism: Explanation, Arguments, and Issues
  • Quiz – Unit 6
Unit 7: The Tribulation and Rapture
  • Understanding the Concept of a Tribulation Period
  • Finding Quotes and Allusions to Daniel 9:27
  • The Church and the Tribulation: Pretribulational Rapture
  • The Church and the Tribulation: Posttribulational Rapture
  • Quiz – Unit 7
Unit 8: Dispensationalism and Covenant Theology
  • Introduction to Dispensationalism and Covenant Theology
  • Understanding Dispensationalism
  • Understanding Covenant Theology
  • Key Issues of Disagreement
  • Saving Highlighted Notes from Commentaries to Specific Note Files
  • Conclusions about Israel and the Church
  • Progressive Dispensationalism
  • Evaluating the Systems
  • Quiz – Unit 8
  • Final Exam

Dr. Carl Sanders is an associate professor of theology at Lancaster Bible College’s Capital Bible Seminary. He has taught at college and seminary levels since 1999 at several schools: Bethel University (St. Paul, Minnesota), Northwestern College (St. Paul, Minnesota), and Washington Bible College in Washington, DC, where he also served as chair of the Bible and theology department (2003–2012).

Dr. Sanders is well liked by his students for his down-to-earth presentation of Bible doctrine. Students quickly learn that he enjoys talking about theology and has a quick wit. Among his strengths as a lecturer are his ability to distill information to essential elements, as well as his good-natured way of fairly explaining differences in theological positions. Dr. Sanders has a keen interest in urban ministry and has served for many years in racially diverse urban congregations. His interest in local-church experience helps him practice theology in ways that reflect the diversity present in the body of Christ. He strives to make theology interesting and practical.

Dr. Ronn Johnson, lecturer in biblical studies at the University of Northwestern St. Paul, Minnesota, has been the senior pastor at his church, Coon Rapids Evangelical Free, since 2006. He previously taught in the Bible departments at Pillsbury Baptist Bible College (1991–1994) and The Master’s College (1994–1996).

Dr. Johnson is well known by his students for demanding that they think about what they believe instead of being passive listeners. His approach is the opposite of proof-texting—simply quoting Bible verses without consideration of what they might mean in context. His goal is to drive home the point that the Bible is more than a collection of verses to be memorized and thrown into play—it’s a message from God that had a clear, coherent purpose that we need to hear without imposing our own traditions on the text. That approach of loyalty to the Bible above all else comes through in his Mobile Ed sessions on Bible doctrine.

He and his wife, Susan, have three teenage children. His pastimes include reading and giving too much attention to Kirby, the family dog.

TH200 Christian Thought: Orthodoxy and Heresy

  • Instructor: Beth Felker Jones
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 8

In her approachable and relatable teaching style, Dr. Beth Felker Jones explains major doctrines and heresies of the Christian faith. She describes the concepts of divine revelation, the Trinity, the fall, salvation, grace and free will, and the differences between Calvinism and Arminianism. You’ll gain a basic understanding of pneumatology (the study of the Holy Spirit), ecclesiology (the study of the Church), eschatology (the study of end times), and the many related heresies. Additionally, you’ll learn to harmonize Scripture, tradition, experience, and reason in understanding and forming your own theology.

Contents:

Unit 1: Introduction to Theology
  • Why Study Doctrine?
  • What Is Doctrine?
  • Orthodoxy and Heresy
  • The Wesleyan Quadrilateral: Introduction
  • The Wesleyan Quadrilateral: Scripture and Tradition
  • The Wesleyan Quadrilateral: Reason
  • The Wesleyan Quadrilateral: Experience
Unit 2: Revelation
  • General and Special Revelation
  • Searching for Modes of Revelation Using a Basic Search and Clippings
  • Relationship between General and Special Revelation
  • Inspiration and Illumination
  • Heresies Regarding Revelation
  • Inerrancy and Infallibility
Unit 3: The Trinity
  • The Doctrine of the Trinity
  • Trinitarian Heresies: Adoptionism
  • Trinitarian Heresies: Modalism
  • Trinitarian Heresies: Arianism
  • Trinitarian Orthodoxy: The Nicene Creed
  • Trinitarian Orthodoxy: Affirmations of the Nicene Creed
  • Trinitarian Orthodoxy: Scripture and Trinitarian Language
  • Trinitarian Orthodoxy: Life as Relationship
  • Trinitarian Orthodoxy: The Trinity and Worship
Unit 4: Creation and Providence
  • The Genesis Narrative
  • Using the Faithlife Study Bible to Explore Creation Accounts
  • The Creator/Creature Distinction
  • Creation Out of Nothing
  • Created Goodness and Gnosticism
  • Providence
  • Creation and Providence: Summary
Unit 5: Humanity
  • Which Human Nature?
  • Middle Creatures and Opposing Heresies
  • Created in the Image of God
  • The Image of God (Gen 1:26–27): Collections and Custom Guides
  • The Fall and Related Heresies
  • Original Sin and Related Heresies
  • True Humanity in Christ
Unit 6: Christ
  • Who Is Jesus?
  • Christological Controversies
  • Christological Heresies: Apollinarianism
  • Christological Heresies: Monophysitism
  • Christological Heresies: Nestorianism
  • Orthodox Christology
  • The Hypostatic Union
  • Heretical and Orthodox Christology
  • Studying the Christological Controversies Using the Ancient Literature Section
Unit 7: Salvation
  • Introduction to the Doctrine of Salvation
  • Beginnings: The Way of Salvation
  • Justification and Related Heresies
  • Sanctification and Related Heresies
  • Final Redemption
  • Grace and Human Freedom: Arminianism
  • Grace and Human Freedom: Calvinism
  • Models of Atonement: Deification
  • Models of Atonement: Christus Victor
  • Models of Atonement: Cross-Centered Models
  • Models of Atonement: Moral Exemplar
Unit 8: Spirit
  • Introduction to Pneumatology
  • The Spirit and Prayer
  • The Procession of the Spirit
  • Gendered Language
  • Discovering How John Personalizes the Spirit in John 16:13
  • The Spirit and Vague Spirituality
  • Sanctifying Grace
  • Searching Holiness Terms in the Pauline Epistles
  • Charismatic Gifts
  • The Age of Pentecost
Unit 9: Church
  • Introduction to Ecclesiology
  • Body and Bride
  • Marks of the Church
  • The Donatist Controversy
  • Unity in Brokenness
  • The Church and Sacrament
  • The Church's Understanding of Sacraments
Unit 10: Last Things
  • Introduction to Eschatology
  • Eschatological Tension
  • Not Yet
  • Waiting in Eager Expectation
  • Studying Eschatology with Tilde and Milestone Searches (Matt 24:36)
  • The Resurrection of the Body
  • The “Already” of Resurrection
  • The “Not Yet” of Resurrection
  • Using Louw-Nida to Understand Sōma in 1 Corinthians
  • Conclusion

Dr. Beth Felker Jones teaches theology at Wheaton College and earned her PhD at Duke University. Dr. Jones is the author of several books, including a study of the bodily resurrection titled The Marks of His Wounds (Oxford University Press, 2007), God the Spirit (Cascade, 2014), and Practicing Christian Doctrine (Baker Academic, 2014). She also writes for The Christian Century and is committed to writing theology for the church. Dr. Jones’ interests include conversion, theology and gender, and what it means to be human in Christ. She and her husband, Brian, have four children.

CH151 Introducing Historical Theology I: Apostles to the Reformation

  • Instructor: Roger Olson
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 6

In this course, you’ll learn about the first 1,500 years of Christian history, focusing especially on the development of Christian doctrine. Instructor Roger Olson expands on doctrines such as the Trinity and Christ’s hypostatic union—doctrines that most Christians are aware of, but may never have studied at length. The Middle Ages are covered, particularly highlighting the way that medieval theologians understood the knowledge of God and the relationship between faith and reason. The course ends with the Renaissance—a period during which there were initial calls for reform within the church—and early church reformers who came before the theology of Martin Luther.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Establishing the Roots of Theology
  • What Is Theology?
  • The Definition and Purpose of Historical Theology
  • Theology in the New Testament and Early Church
  • Heresies in Early Christianity
  • Challenges for Theology in Early Christianity
  • The Beginnings of Theology in the Apostolic Fathers
  • The Role of Christian Apologists in Early Christianity
Unit 2: Theology in the Post-Apostolic Church
  • Irenaeus: The First Christian Systematic Theologian
  • Irenaeus: Defending the Incarnation within the Doctrine of Salvation
  • Clement of Alexandria: Theologian and Philosopher
  • Origen of Alexandria: A Speculative Christian Theologian
  • Tertullian: The Father of Latin Christian Theology
  • Tertullian: Influence on Christian Doctrine
  • The Changing Landscape of Theology in the Early Church
  • Cyprian of Carthage: Catholic Theologian and Bishop
  • The Development of the Christian Canon of Scripture
Unit 3: Theology in the Christian Roman Empire
  • Constantine and the Rise of Christendom
  • The Arian Controversy
  • The Trinitarian Controversy and the Council of Nicaea
  • The Christological Controversy: Jesus as Both Human and Divine
  • Heresies Addressed by the Third and Fourth Ecumenical Councils
  • Christian Orthodoxy: The Trinity and the Hypostatic Union
  • Augustine: The Father of Western Christianity
  • Augustine’s Core Beliefs
  • The Impact of Augustine’s View of Predestination on Church History
Unit 4: The Deepening Divide between the East and the West
  • Gregory the Great: Foundation of Roman Catholic Theology
  • The Gradual Separation of the Greek Orthodox from the Roman Catholics
  • Controversies in the Eastern Orthodox Church
  • Filioqueand the Great Schism
  • The Eastern Orthodox View of Filioque
Unit 5: Theology in the High Middle Ages
  • Scholasticism and Anselm of Canterbury
  • Scholasticism and Thomas Aquinas
  • Atonement Theology and Anselm’s Response
  • Moral Influence Theory: The Atonement Theology of Peter Abelard
  • Philosophy and Theology in Medieval Christian Universities
  • The Impact of Saint Francis of Assisi
  • The Power Struggles Which Laid the Groundwork for the Reformation
  • Scholastic Theologians: Duns Scotus and William of Ockham
  • Medieval Catholic Dogmas and Councils
Unit 6: Renaissance Theology
  • Christian and Secular Humanism
  • The Life of Erasmus: Christian Humanist
  • Peter Waldo and the First Protestants
  • Catherine of Siena and Catholic Mysticism
  • John Wycliffe: The Morning Star of the Reformation
  • Jan Hus: Forerunner to Martin Luther
  • The Catholic Church on the Eve of the Reformation
Conclusion
  • Concluding the Course

Roger E. Olson is the Foy Valentine Professor of Christian Theology and Ethics at Baylor University's George W. Truett Theological Seminary. Previously he served as professor of theology at Bethel University in Minnesota. He is the author of eighteen books including The Journey of Modern Theology: From Reconstruction to Deconstruction (Intervarsity Press). Dr. Olson was born and raised in the Upper Midwest of the United States and considers himself a "Bapticostal." He grew up Pentecostal but became Baptist while attending North American Baptist Seminary. His PhD in Religious Studies is from Rice University (Houston, Texas) and he studied at the University of Munich with theologian Wolfhart Pannenberg. He served as editor of Christian Scholar's Review in the 1990s and has served as consulting and contributing editor for Christianity Today. He is married and has two adult daughters and two beautiful grandchildren. He enjoys Southern gospel music, Victorian gothic mystery books, and traveling.

CH152 Introducing Historical Theology II: Luther to the Twenty-First Century

  • Instructor: Roger Olson
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 6

In this course, you’ll begin by studying the Catholic church and its theology on the cusp of the Protestant Reformation, setting the stage for the work of Luther, Calvin, and other Protestant Reformers. You’ll continue on to study the post-Reformation period and various Christian movements such as Pietism, Puritanism, and Methodism. A study of modernity, beginning with the Enlightenment and the scientific revolutions, introduces the advent of liberal theology and the response of conservative theologians to the challenges of modernity. The course ends with a study of the postmodernity—its meaning, and the variety of ways that Christian theologians have responded to postmodern thought.

Contents:

  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Sixteenth-Century Reformation
  • Roman Catholic Theology on the Eve of the Reformation
  • Luther and the Beginnings of Protestant Theology
  • The Doctrinal Views of Luther
  • Zwingli, Calvin, and Reformed Theology
  • Key Views of Reformed Theology
  • The Radical Reformers
  • The English Reformation and Anglican Theology
  • Counter-Reformation and the Council of Trent
  • The Scottish Reformation and Puritanism
Unit 2: Aftermath of the Reformation
  • Protestant Scholasticism and Confessionalism
  • Arminius and the Remonstrant Controversy
  • Puritan Theology and Jonathan Edwards
  • Pietism
  • Wesley and Methodism
  • Deism and Natural Religion
  • Beginnings of Baptist Theology
Unit 3: Theology in Relation to Modernity
  • The Enlightenment: Science and Theology
  • The Enlightenment: Philosophy and Theology
  • Friedrich Schleiermacher and Liberal Theology
  • Charles Hodge and Conservative Theology
  • Roman Catholic Modernism
  • Mediating Theology
Unit 4: Early Twentieth-Century Movements
  • Fundamentalism
  • The Social Gospel
  • Karl Barth and Dialectical Theology
  • Reinhold Niebuhr and Christian Realism
  • Existentialist Theology
  • Process Theology
  • Religionless Christianity and the Death of God Theology
  • Theology of Hope
Unit 5: Late Twentieth-Century Movements
  • New Approaches to Roman Catholicism
  • Theologies of Liberation
  • Evangelical Theologies
  • Renaissance of the Doctrine of the Trinity
Unit 6: Postmodern Movements
  • Development of Postmodernity
  • Deconstructionism
  • Postliberal Theology
  • Stanley Hauerwas and Postmodernity
  • The Global South
Conclusion
  • Concluding the Course

Roger E. Olson is the Foy Valentine Professor of Christian Theology and Ethics at Baylor University's George W. Truett Theological Seminary. Previously he served as professor of theology at Bethel University in Minnesota. He is the author of eighteen books including The Journey of Modern Theology: From Reconstruction to Deconstruction (Intervarsity Press). Dr. Olson was born and raised in the Upper Midwest of the United States and considers himself a "Bapticostal." He grew up Pentecostal but became Baptist while attending North American Baptist Seminary. His PhD in Religious Studies is from Rice University (Houston, Texas) and he studied at the University of Munich with theologian Wolfhart Pannenberg. He served as editor of Christian Scholar's Review in the 1990s and has served as consulting and contributing editor for Christianity Today. He is married and has two adult daughters and two beautiful grandchildren. He enjoys Southern gospel music, Victorian gothic mystery books, and traveling.

TH241 Christology: The Doctrine of Christ

  • Instructor: Gerry Breshears
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 7

Gain a better understanding of Jesus Christ as you explore how God became man, how we can be like Jesus, and what a real difference He makes in our lives. Examine the historical reality that Jesus was fully incarnate through the Virgin Mary, lived a human life, died for our sins, rose for our justification and to bring us new life, and is exalted in the highest heaven above all powers that are opposed to the truth of God.

Contents:

Unit 1: Names of Jesus
  • Jesus
  • Emmanuel
  • Rabbi
  • Lord
  • Christ
  • Logos
  • I Am
  • Son of God
  • Son of David
  • Son of Man
Unit 2: Christology
  • Starting Points of Christology
  • Incarnational Christology
  • John 1:1
  • John 1:14
  • Philippians 2
  • Hebrews 1–2
  • Deity
  • Humanity of Christ
  • Incarnation
  • Matthew 3–4
Unit 3: Jesus
  • Theological Method
  • Not Good/Gooder
  • Virgin Birth
  • Revelatory Life
  • Sinless Life
  • Exemplary Life
  • Miraculous Life
  • Death
  • Descent to Hell
  • Resurrection
  • Exaltation
  • Excursus on Easter

Dr. Gerry Breshears has been a professor of theology at Western Seminary since 1980, and has taught and lectured in multiple colleges and seminaries around the world. Additionally, he is a preaching elder at Grace Community Church. He is co-author of Vintage Jesus, Death by Love, Vintage Church, and Doctrine: What Every Christian Should Believe.

TH261 Doctrine of Salvation

  • Instructor: R. Michael Allen
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Video Hours: 5

R. Michael Allen is associate professor of systematic and historical theology and the dean of students at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando. He is eager to guide students to grow in their ability to retrieve theological riches from the past for the sake of renewing contemporary reflection, worship, and witness. In this vein, he is committed to Reformed catholicity as a confession and a posture for doing theology and approaching ministry today.

Prior to joining the faculty of RTS in 2015, Dr. Allen taught undergraduate and graduate students at Wheaton College and then taught at Knox Theological Seminary for five years, where he held the D. James Kennedy Chair of Systematic Theology and also served as dean of the faculty. With Dr. Scott Swain, he serves as general editor of the T&T Clark International Theological Commentary and the New Studies in Dogmatics series for Zondervan Academic. He also serves as book review editor for the renowned International Journal of Systematic Theology and is a teaching elder in the Evangelical Presbyterian Church.

TH215 Trinitarian Theology

  • Instructor: Peter J. Leithart
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 3

Delve into Trinitarian theology and understand how how the Trinity is a biblically rooted doctrine inherent in the gospel. Explore the God who’s revealed in Scripture, the God who’s revealed in the NT, the God who’s revealed in Jesus, is the God of the gospel, who is Father, Son, and Spirit. Understand the distinction between the ontological and the economic Trinity and develop the concept of perichoresis, the mutual indwelling of the Father, Son, and Spirit in the life of God. The Trinitarian theology is the development of that great good news and of our share in it as disciples of Jesus Christ.

Contents:

Unit 1: Trinity: Unique to Christianity
  • Greco-Roman Polytheism and Jewish Monotheism: Framework for Trinitarian Theology
  • The Practical Nature of the Doctrine of the Trinity
Unit 2: God of the Gospel
  • Triune Life of God Evident throughout the New Testament
  • Trinitarian Theology: Jesus Inserted into Jewish Confessions of Faith
  • Trinity in Assertions the New Testament Makes about Jesus and the Spirit
  • Trinity in the Structure of the Gospel
  • Jesus as Yahweh of Israel
Unit 3: A Brief History of Trinitarian Theology
  • Early Trinitarian Theology Worked Out in Response to Modalism
  • Early Trinitarian Theology Worked Out in Response to Arianism: Part 1
  • Early Trinitarian Theology Worked Out in Response to Arianism: Part 2
  • Moddle Ages Trinitarian Theology
  • Modern Trinitarian Theology
  • Contemporary Trinitarian Theology
  • Themes in Contemporary Trinitarian Theology
Unit 4: Basic Categories of Trinitarian Theology
  • Essence
  • Person
  • Ontological and Economic
  • Rahner’s Rule
  • Filioque
Unit 5: What Difference Does Trinitarian Theology Make?
  • Trinity and Attributes: Part 1
  • Trinity and Attributes: Part 2
  • Triune Ontology
  • Perichoresis
  • Perichoretic Worldview: Part 1
  • Perichoretic Worldview: Part 2

Peter J. Leithart received an AB in English and History from Hillsdale College in 1981, and a Master of Arts in Religion and a Master of Theology from Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia in 1986 and 1987, respectively. In 1998 he received his PhD at the University of Cambridge in England. He has served as editor and writer for American Vision in Atlanta, Georgia (1987-1989), and as a pastor of Reformed Heritage Presbyterian Church (now Trinity Presbyterian Church), Birmingham, Alabama from 1989-1995. From 1998-2013, he taught Theology and Literature at New Saint Andrews College and between 2003 and 2013 served as pastor of Trinity Reformed Church. He is currently President of the Theopolis Institute, a pastoral training institute in Birmingham, Alabama.

TH222 Theological Anthropology

  • Instructor: Marc Cortez
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Video Hours: 14

TH321 Theology in Society

  • Instructor: Richard S. Park
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Video Hours: 4

In Cultural Implications of Theology: Influences of Christian Doctrine on Society, Dr. Richard S. Park seeks to demonstrate how theology makes a real difference in society and how the gospel transforms culture. Dr. Park explores the social implications of the doctrines of creation, fall, redemption, and glorification, as well as the influences that sociology, anthropology, and other sources of “secular wisdom” can have on Christian theology. He puts forth a framework for how Christians are to think biblically about culture and how they are to engage culture winsomely in their God-given, day-to-day callings.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
Unit 1: Gospel and Culture: An Introduction
  • What Is the Relationship between Gospel and Culture?
  • What Is the Biblical Warrant for the Transformation View?
  • Three I’s of Christian Cultural Analysis
  • Application of the Three I’s of Christian Cultural Analysis and the Transformation View
  • Worldviews Plus World-Setting
  • Application of Christian Cultural Analysis
Unit 2: Christian Theology and Its Impact on Society
  • Introduction: What Is Theology? What Is Society?
  • The Interconnection between Theology and Society
  • Standing on the Shoulders of Giants: Part One
  • Three Implications of These Global Conditions
  • Standing on the Shoulders of Giants: Part Two
  • Biblical Basis for the Interconnection between Theology and Society
Unit 3: Several Social Implications of the Doctrine of Creation
  • Introducing the Doctrine of Creation
  • The Doctrine of Creation Commends a Self-Sacrificing Life as the Most Satisfying Life
  • Human Persons, Created in the Image of the Triune God, Are Inherently Communal Beings
  • The Body Matters: Sexuality Is Sacred
  • Matter Matters
  • Creation Care Counts
Unit 4: The Doctrine of the Fall and the Sociological Notion of Reification
  • Introducing the Doctrine of the Fall
  • Three Important Effects of Humanity’s Fall
  • The Doctrine of Total Depravity
  • The Doctrine of the Transcendentals
  • The Sociological Notion of Reification
  • Reification and the Three I’s of Christian Cultural Analysis
Unit 5: The Universe-Wide View of the Christian Doctrine of Redemption
  • The Wide Scope of the Christian Doctrine of Redemption
  • Biblical Basis for Society-Wide Redemption
  • Worship Is Everything and Everything Is Worship: Part One
  • Worship Is Everything and Everything Is Worship: Part Two
  • Redemption: Souls and Society; Culture and Nature
  • Critiquing a Crisis
Unit 6: Doing Our Part: Finding and Fulfilling Our Calling in the Kingdom
  • How Individual Christians Can Discern Their God-Given “Callings”
  • Career, Calling, and Worship
  • Biblical Basis for Calling as Worship
  • Our GPS in the Kingdom: Gifts
  • Our GPS in the Kingdom: Passions
  • Our GPS in the Kingdom: Serving God’s Purposes
Unit 7: Living from the Outside In
  • Transforming Culture as Well as Our Hearts
  • The Myth of a Rationalist Anthropology
  • Appreciating Our Embodied Reality
  • Living All of Life as Liturgy
  • Recovering Rest as Worship
Conclusion
  • Conclusion to the Course

Dr. Richard S. Park is assistant professor of religion at Vanguard University, specializing in ethics and political theology. He obtained his DPhil in theology from the University of Oxford and completed two master’s degrees at Biola University, along with a bachelor’s at the University of California, Berkeley. He is founder and president of a nonprofit organization called Renaissance Forum that helps people discern and live out their God-guided callings. Dr. Park’s most recent publication is Constructing Civility: The Human Good in Christian and Islamic Political Theologies. He speaks at conferences and churches in the U.S. and abroad on topics such as calling, culture, civility, and character.

TH331 Perspectives on Creation: Six Views on Its Meaning and Significance

  • Instructors: Joseph A. Pipa Jr., Mark D. Futato, C. John Collins, Tremper Longman III, and John H. Walton
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Video Hours: 5

The belief that God created the world is foundational for Christians. However, the exact nature of God’s work in creation is debated. In this course, five leading Old Testament scholars present the distinct features and biblical bases of their particular views:

  • Joseph A. Pipa Jr.—Six-Day Creation
  • Mark D. Futato—Literary Framework
  • C. John Collins—Analogical Days View
  • Tremper Longman III—Evolutionary Creationism
  • John H. Walton—Identity Accounts

As they unpack the meaning and significance of the creation account, they discuss topics like hermeneutics, the genre of Genesis 1, the nature of the days in the creation week, ancient Near Eastern backgrounds and ancient cosmology, the relationship between the Bible and science, and the theological implications these various views have for the believer. This course will provide you with a better understanding of the different positions Christians hold regarding creation and will equip you to be able to explain the different issues involved in Genesis 1–2.The activities resource for this course includes additional videos by John Mark N. Reynolds and James B. Jordan, helping you reflect further on the significance of creation

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speakers and the Course
Unit 1: Six-Day Creation by Joseph A. Pipa Jr.
  • Introducing Joseph A. Pipa Jr.
  • Summary of Six-Day Creation
  • Assessing the Importance
  • Overview of Genesis 1
  • The Work of Creation and the Declaration of Fulfillment
  • The Statement of Purpose and the Expression of Delight
  • The Record of Time
  • Summary and Conclusion to Six-Day Creation
Unit 2: Literary Framework by Mark D. Futato
  • Introducing Mark D. Futato
  • What Do We Expect Genesis 1–2 to Teach Us?
  • Eight Creative Acts in Six Days
  • Dischronologization
  • A Neglected Text
  • Two Pictures of the World
  • The Firmament (Genesis 1:6–7)
  • The Foundations of the Earth
  • Two Big Lights (Genesis 1:16)
  • Phenomenological, Anthropomorphic, and Old World Imagery
  • Conclusion to Literary Framework
Unit 3: Analogical Days by C. John Collins
  • Introducing C. John Collins
  • Summary of Analogical Days View
  • Authorial Intent
  • Reading in Context
  • Genesis 1 and Genesis 2
  • How Did the Author Structure Genesis 1?
  • So What about Those Days?
  • Summary of the Doctrine of Creation in Genesis 1:1–2:3
  • Other Views and Objections to the Analogous Days View
Unit 4: Evolutionary Creationism by Tremper Longman III
  • Introducing Tremper Longman III
  • Summary of Evolutionary Creationism
  • Inerrancy, Genre, and Ancient Cognitive Environment
  • The Structure and Genre of Genesis
  • A Figurative Description of the Past
  • Summary of Theological Truths in Genesis 1–2
  • The Bible and Evolutionary Theory
Unit 5: Identity Accounts by John H. Walton
  • Introducing John H. Walton
  • Summary of Identity Accounts
  • Biblical Authority and Cultural Rivers
  • The Old Testament and the Ancient Near East
  • What Sort of Account?
  • Temple and Rest
  • Seven Days
  • Archetypes
  • Dust and Rib
  • Other Views

Joseph A. Pipa, Jr. has been both a church pastor and theological professor. He is President and Professor of Historical and Systematic Theology at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary in South Carolina and exercises a worldwide expositional ministry.

Dr. Mark Futato joined Reformed Theological Seminary (RTS) in 1999, and serves as the Robert L. Maclellan Professor of Old Testament. He teaches core classes on Hebrew and Old Testament books. Dr. Futato served as academic dean of RTS Orlando from 2004 to 2012.

Dr. Futato’s research interests include biblical Hebrew, the book of Psalms, and the role that elements of creation, such as climate and geography, play in Scripture. Dr. Futato has published multiple books on the Psalms, as well as an introduction to biblical Hebrew. He is currently finishing a commentary on Jonah.

Dr. Futato also served on the translation team for the book of Psalms in The New Living Translation (NLT), contributed study notes for the ESV Study Bible and The Spirit of the Reformation Study Bible, and contributed to the New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis (5 vols.).

Students appreciate Dr. Futato’s passionate emphasis on God’s desire to bless all nations, his engaging communication style, and his practical application of biblical texts to those who struggle, suffer, and doubt. Dr. Futato and his wife, Adele, have four children: William, Evan, Mark Jr., and Annie.

C. John Collins is professor of Old Testament at Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri. With degrees from MIT and Faith Evangelical Lutheran Seminary, he pursues such research interests as Hebrew and Greek grammar, science and faith, and biblical theology. He is the author of Genesis 1-4: A Linguistic, Literary, and Theological Commentary and The God of Miracles: An Exegetical Examination of God’s Action in the World.

Tremper Longman III is the Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies at Westmont College. He has written over 25 books, including commentaries on Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Daniel, and Nahum. His books have been translated into 17 different languages. In addition, as a Hebrew scholar, he is one of the main translators of the popular New Living Translation, and has served as a consultant on other popular Bible translations, including The Message, the New Century Version, the Holman Standard Bible, and the Common Bible. He has also edited and contributed to a number of study Bibles and Bible dictionaries, most recently The Baker Illustrated Bible Dictionary.

He earned his BA from Ohio Wesleyan University, his MDiv from Westminster Theological Seminary, and both his MPhil and PhD from Yale University. Dr. Longman and his wife, Alice, have three sons and two granddaughters.

Dr. John Walton, professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College, spent 20 years teaching at Moody Bible Institute.

In his college years, he developed a passion for archaeology and Bible history. Instead of training to be an archaeologist, though, he focused his attention on studies comparing the culture and literature of the Bible and the ancient Near East. He has never lost his fascination with this subject, but comparative studies only provide one of the means by which he tries to get people excited about the Old Testament. He’s saddened by how little exposure to and understanding of the Old Testament many Christians have, but he’s passionate in doing whatever he can to remedy this spiritual and theological loss.

TH341 Perspectives on Eschatology: Five Views on the Millennium

  • Instructors: Darrell L. Bock, Douglas J. Moo, Sam Storms, Peter J. Leithart, and N.T. Wright
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Video Hours: 4

Eschatology, the study of end times, is one of the most debated subjects in Christianity. Believers hold different positions on important topics like the rapture of believers, a seven-year tribulation period, and the nature of the millennial reign of Christ. In this course, five preeminent theologians and New Testament scholars put forth their perspectives on eschatology:

  • Darrell L. Bock—Pre-tribulation Premillennialism
  • Douglas J. Moo—Post-tribulation Premillennialism
  • Sam Storms—Amillennialism
  • Peter J. Leithart—Postmillennial Preterism
  • N.T. Wright—New Heavens, New Earth Eschatology

After hearing each side of the eschatology debate, you’ll have a better understanding of the different positions Christians hold about the end times and be able to explain the various issues involved when studying eschatology.

Contents:

Introduction
  • Introducing the Speakers and the Course
Unit 1: Pre-Tribulation Premillennialism by Darrell L. Bock
  • Introduction
  • Position Summary
  • Jesus’ Return Is a Physical Return (Acts 1:4–11)
  • The Millennium as a 1,000 Year Period of Jesus’ Rule on Earth (Rev 20:1–6)
  • The “Caught Up in the Air”/Rapture Passage (1 Thess 4:13–18)
  • The Day of the Lord Is Not for Believers but for Judgment (1 Thess 5:1–7)
  • Judgment Makes Way for the Millennium (Rev 19:11–21)
  • Other Views and Objections
Unit 2: Post-Tribulation Premillennialism by Douglas J. Moo
  • Introduction
  • Summary Statement
  • The Tribulation and the Rapture
  • Jesus’ Olivet Discourse (Matt 24)
  • First Thessalonians 4:13–18
  • Second Thessalonians 2:1–12
  • Revelation 3:10
  • Other Views and Objections
Unit 3: Amillennialism by Sam Storms
  • Introduction
  • Summary Statement
  • My Journey to Amillennialism
  • A Cumulative Case Argument for Amillennialism: Part 1
  • A Cumulative Case Argument for Amillennialism: Part 2
  • A Cumulative Case Argument for Amillennialism: Part 3
  • Other Views and Objections
Unit 4: Postmillennial Preterism by Peter J. Leithart
  • Introduction
  • Summary Statement
  • Out with the Old, in with the New
  • Dating Revelation
  • Revelation’s Story Line
  • Witness
  • On Earth as in Heaven
  • Closing Remarks
Unit 5: New Heavens, New Earth Eschatology by N. T. Wright
  • Introduction
  • Summary Statement
  • The Christian Hope
  • The Resurrection
  • Heaven on Earth
  • The Launch of God’s New World
  • Participating in God’s New World
  • Glory through Suffering
  • Citizenship in Heaven

Dr. Darrell L. Bock, research professor of New Testament studies and professor of spiritual development and culture at Dallas Theological Seminary, serves as editor-at-large for Christianity Today, and is on the board of Chosen People Ministries and Wheaton College. From 2000 to 2001, Dr. Bock served as president of the Evangelical Theological Society.

He has earned international recognition as a Humboldt Scholar for his work in Luke-Acts, historical Jesus study, biblical theology, as well as with messianic Jewish ministries. He has published articles in the Los Angeles Times and The Dallas Morning News and is a well-known author of over 30 books. His publications include Studying the Historical Jesus: A Guide to Sources and Methods,Jesus According to Scripture, an NIV Application Commentary on Luke, Breaking the Da Vinci Code, and commentaries on Acts and Luke in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (BECNT) series.

Dr. Douglas J. Moo, professor of New Testament, teaches at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. For over twenty years, his ministry was based at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois. His academic interests revolve around the interface of exegesis and theology.

Dr. Moo seeks to model to students a rigorous approach to the Greek text that always asks the “so what” questions of ultimate significance and application. The Pauline and General Letters have been his special focus within the NT canon. In the next few years, he will be writing commentaries on Galatians and Hebrews, a Pauline theology, and a theological and practical book on creation care.

He has also been active in his local church, serving as elder most years, teaching and preaching to the church, and conducting home Bible studies. Also very rewarding has been his service on the Committee on Bible Translation, the group of scholars charged with revising the text of the NIV and with producing the TNIV.

Sam Storms earned a ThM in historical theology from Dallas Theological Seminary and a PhD in intellectual history from the University of Texas at Dallas. He is the founder of Enjoying God Ministries, senior pastor of Bridgeway Church in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and a former visiting professor of theology at Wheaton College. He is the author of over two dozen books and currently serves as president of the Evangelical Theological Society.

Peter J. Leithart is president of the Theopolis Institute—a Birmingham, Alabama-based leadership training institute focused on the Bible, liturgy, and culture—and teacher at Trinity Presbyterian Church in Birmingham. He earned his PhD from the University of Cambridge and is the author of several books, including the volumes on Revelation in the International Theological Commentary series (forthcoming).

Nicholas Thomas “Tom” Wright (1948–) has been named by Christianity Today as one of our time’s top theologians. He is currently professor of New Testament and early Christianity at St. Andrews University. Wright holds a bachelor’s degree in theology, a master’s in Anglican ministry, and a DPhil, all from University of Oxford.

A fellow and chaplain at Cambridge from 1978 to 1981, he then served as assistant professor of New Testament language and literature at McGill University in Montreal. Before becoming a chaplain, tutor, lecturer, and fellow at Oxford in 1986, Wright served as dean of Lichfield Cathedral, canon theologian of Westminster Abbey, and bishop of Durham.

His academic work has usually been published under the name “N.T. Wright,” but works such as What St. Paul Really Said and Simply Christian, aimed at a more popular readership, were published under the less formal name of “Tom Wright.”

TH361 Perspectives on the Trinity: Eternal Generation and Subordination in Tension

  • Instructors: Fred Sanders, Kevin Giles, Millard J. Erickson, Bruce A. Ware, and Wayne Grudem
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Video Hours: 4

In Perspectives on the Trinity: Eternal Generation and Subordination in Tension (TH361), Drs. Wayne Grudem, Millard Erickson, Fred Sanders, Bruce Ware, and Kevin Giles explore a major question about the Trinity: Is God the Son subordinate to God the Father in eternity, or not? While Jesus certainly seemed to be subordinate to God during His earthly ministry, was this the case before His incarnation? Afterward? Each contributor lays out his perspective on the issue that affects our understanding of who God is, what the Bible teaches, and what the historic church has taught. The activities resource for this course includes additional videos by Drs. Michael Bird and Scott Harrower, helping to frame the background and significance of this topic.

Contents:

Unit 1: Fred Sanders
  • Introduction and Summary Statement
  • Eternal Generation and Sonship
  • Immanent Form of Economic X
  • Gender Far Away
  • Ideas That Stick
  • Other Views and Closing Remarks
Unit 2: Kevin Giles
  • Introduction
  • Summary Statement
  • History of the Doctrine of the Eternal Generation of the Son
  • The Generation of the Son in Nicene Creed
  • The Biblical Basis for the Doctrine of the Eternal Generation of the Son
  • Augustine on John 7:29
Unit 3: Millard Erickson
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
  • Summary Statement
  • God the Son Eternally Has Equal Authority with God the Father
  • A Challenge to This View
  • The Practical Value of This Teaching
Unit 4: Bruce Ware
  • Introduction
  • Summary Statement
  • Two Pillars of Trinitarian Theology
  • The Primacy of the Father
  • The Agency of the Son
  • The Empowering of the Spirit
  • Answering Objections and Conclusion
Unit 5: Wayne Grudem
  • Introduction
  • Summary Statement
  • Evidence for the Son’s Submission to the Father Prior to Incarnation: Part 1
  • Evidence for the Son’s Submission to the Father Prior to Incarnation: Part 2
  • Evidence for the Son’s Submission to the Father after His Ascension into Heaven
  • Other Theologians Who Hold to Eternal Submission of the Son to the Father
  • Points of Clarification
  • Opponents of Eternal Submission of the Son to the Father
  • Opponents of Eternal Submission Undermine the Authority of Scripture

Fred Sanders is professor of theology in the Torrey Honors Institute at Biola University. He holds a BA in drawing and printmaking, an MDiv from Asbury Theological Seminary, and a PhD in systematic theology from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. His research covers a wide range of the major Christian doctrines, but his consistent focus is on the doctrine of the Trinity. He is the author of The Deep Things of God: How the Trinity Changes Everything, The Triune God, and several other books and articles.

Kevin Giles is an ordained Anglican minister and worked in parish ministry for almost forty years before he retired from St. Michaels Church in North Carlton in 2006. He studied at Moore College in Sydney, Durham University in England, and Tübingen University in Germany. He is a widely published author and has contributed to the IVP Dictionaries of Jesus and the Gospels and The Later New Testament & Its Developments, and the Zondervan Dictionary of Christian Spirituality.

Millard Erickson (b. 1932) is Distinguished Professor of Theology at Western Seminary, Portland, and the author of the widely acclaimed systematics work Christian Theology along with more than twenty other books. He was professor of theology and academic dean at Bethel Seminary for many years. He earned a B.A. from the University of Minnesota, a B.D. from Northern Baptist Seminary, an M.A. from the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University.

Bruce Ware is a highly esteemed theologian and author in the evangelical world. He came to Southern Seminary from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School where he served as Chairman of the Department of Biblical and Systematic Theology. Prior to this, he taught at Western Conservative Baptist Seminary and Bethel Theological Seminary.

Wayne Grudem is a New Testament scholar turned theologian, author, and research professor of Bible and theology at Phoenix Seminary, Arizona. He earned a BA from Harvard University, an MDiv from Westminster Theological Seminary, and a PhD from the University of Cambridge. In 2001 Grudem moved to Phoenix Seminary after having taught at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School for more than twenty years where he was also the chairman of the Department of Biblical and Systematic Theology.

Also contributing

Michael F. Bird is lecturer in theology at Ridley Melbourne College in Melbourne, Australia. He earned his PhD at the University of Queensland. He is the author of many books, including Evangelical Theology: A Biblical and Systematic Introduction, Jesus and the Origins of the Gentiles Mission, and The Saving Righteousness of God.

Scott Harrower is a lecturer in Christian thought at Ridley College and an ordained Anglican minister. He earned a PhD in Systematic Theology from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Scott regularly presents on topics such as early Christianity in Roman contexts, and philosophical responses to the problem(s) of evil. He is the author of Trinitarian Self and Salvation: An Evangelical Engagement with Rahner's Rule and is currently working on The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers (with Michael F. Bird) and The Relevant Trinity (forthcoming, Lexham Press).

TH390 Contextual Theology: Examples from Christianity in Africa, Asia, and Latin America

  • Instructor: Victor Ezigbo
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Video Hours: 7

Contextual theology requires you to take human contact seriously and is an indispensable source of theology. Victor Ezigbo discusses how contextual theology can teach theologians who already do theology from a systematic, historical, or biblical perspective. Ezigbo explores the “ancestor Christologists” in Africa, who look at Jesus Christ as an “ancestor”—someone analagous to the African concept of an ancestor of the spiritual world and the physical world. He explores liberation theologians in South America and their work, including their emphasis on engaging in social action and taking on socio-political problems in their communities. Ezigbo considers Dalit theologians as an example of theology in Asia. These individuals take on the questions that the Dalits—who are considered outcasts in the traditional Hindu system — are asking about the gospel. All of these contextual theologians from around the world have learned that theologians have the responsibility of serving the church — they should identify the needs of the church and address those needs in the ways that people can understand. Contextual theology will help all theologians accomplish this great task.

Contents:

Unit 1: Introduction to Contextual Theology
  • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
  • What Is Contextual Theology?
  • Contextual Character of Theology
  • Method, Sources, and Resources in the Practice of Contextual Theology
  • Process of Theological Construction
  • Three Steps of Contextual Theologizing
  • Criticisms of Contextual Theology
  • Benefits of Contextual Theology
  • Contextual Theology Examples from the Earliest Christian Communities
Unit 2: History of Contextual Theology
  • Contextual Theology: Before 1950s
  • 1950s and Onwards: Africa
  • 1950s and Onwards: Latin America
  • 1950s and Onwards: Asia
  • 1950s and Onwards: North America
Unit 3: Christianity in Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Christianity in Northern Africa
  • Major Factors in African Christianity
  • Key Assumptions of Western Missionaries in Africa
  • Western Missionary Strategies in Sub-Saharan Africa
Unit 4: Churches and Theologies
  • Reforming the Church from ”Within”
  • Reforming the Church from “Outside”
  • Features of African Indigenous Churches (AICs)
  • Rise of “African Christian Theologies”
  • Christological Presuppositions in African Christianity: Gap and Fulfillment
  • Christological Presuppositions in African Christianity: Deconstructionist
  • Christological Presuppositions in African Christianity: Reconstructionist
  • Christological Presuppositions in African Christianity: Solutions-Oriented (Grassroots)
  • Christological Presuppositions in African Christianity: Communicative and Hermeneutical
Unit 5: African Contextual Christology
  • Who Is an “Ancestor” in African Traditions?
  • How Is the Concept of “Ancestor” Useful for Doing Christology in Africa?
  • In What Ways Can Jesus Become an African Ancestor?
  • Summary and Critique of Ancestor Christology
  • Usage of the Idea of a “Revealer”
  • Illustration of the Revealer Christology
Unit 6: Christianity
  • The “Church” Today
  • What Can Christian Communities Learn from African Contextual Theology?
Unit 7: Latin America: Liberation Theology
  • Issues that Led to the Birth of Latin American Liberation Theology
  • Grassroots Response to Social/Political Issues in Latin America
  • Theologians’ Response to Social-Economic Issues of Latin America
  • Strategies of Latin American Liberation Theologians
  • Hermeneutics of Liberation Theology
  • Political Characteristics of Liberation Theology
  • Major Theological Themes in Liberation Theology: The Poor
Unit 8: Gustavo Gutierrez
  • Contributions of Gutierrez to Liberation Theologies in Latin America
  • Preferential Option for the Poor: Its Definitions
  • Preferential Option for the Poor: Its Theological Justification
  • Summary of Gutierrez’ Contributions
Unit 9: Assessing Liberation Theology
  • Criticisms of Liberation Theology
  • Responses to Criticisms of Liberation Theology
  • Reflections on Liberation Theology
Unit 10: Asia: Dalit Theology
  • Introduction to Indian Christianity
  • Dalits within Indian Caste System
  • Why Did Dalit Theology Emerge?
  • Sources of Dalit Theology
  • Dalit Resistance Movement
  • Goals of Dalit Theology
  • Contributions of Joshua Kavi Gurram to Dalit Christian Theology
  • Concluding Reflections on Dalit Theology
Unit 11: Theology
  • If Theology Is Inherently Contextual, Why Use the Term “Contextual Theology”?
  • How Does Contextual Theology Relate to Other Forms of Theology?
  • Does Contextual Theology Have a Place for a Universally Binding Theology?
  • What Blind Spots Affect How We Do Contextual Theology?
  • What Are Some of the Steps to Develop and Apply Contextual Theologies?
  • Are There Different Approaches within the Field of Contextual Theology?
  • Is There a Preferred Model of Contextual Theology?
  • Course Summary

  • Introducing Christian Theologies: Voices from Global Christian Communities
  • and
  • Re–Imagining African Christologies: Conversing with the Interpretations and Appropriations of Jesus in Contemporary African Christianity.
  • Victor Ezigbo received his PhD at the University of Edinburgh and is associate professor of systematic and contextual theology at Bethel University in St. Paul, Minnesota. His areas of research are Christology, African Christian theologies, African indigenous religions, and world Christianity. He is the founder of The Center for Research in Global Christianity. His recent books include
  • Introducing Christian Theologies: Voices from Global Christian Communities
  • and
  • Re–Imagining African Christologies: Conversing with the Interpretations and Appropriations of Jesus in Contemporary African Christianity.
  • BI171 Problems in Bible Interpretation: Why Do Christians Disagree about End Times?

    • Instructor: Michael S. Heiser
    • Publication Date: 2016
    • Video Hours: 4

    Why do Christians disagree over interpretations of the end times? If you have ever wondered this, or if you are struggling to understand a fellow Christian’s point-of-view, this course will give you the insight you desire. Scripture addressing the end times include a number of difficult passages, which Dr. Heiser unpacks with faithfulness and wisdom. He guides you through assumptions inherent in various interpretations of end-times events and introduces you to several options for interpreting each passage. Dr. Heiser focuses on the importance of being able to understand various points of view and gives you tools to support why you believe what you believe.

    Contents:

    Unit 1: Understanding the Kingdom of God
    • Why Do Christians Disagree About End Times?
    • The Nature of the Kingdom of God
    • Introducing the Abrahamic Covenant
    • Conditional or Unconditional Promises
    • The Nature of Salvation for Jews and Gentiles
    • Discussing the Boundaries of the Promised Land
    • The Present or Future Kingdom of God
    • Summarizing the Nature of the Kingdom of God
    Unit 2: Rapture or Not?
    • Interpreting the Concept of a “Rapture”
    • End Times Events: The Hermeneutics of Harmonization
    • Distinguishing Between Israel and the Church
    • The Timing of Jesus’s Return
    • Does Scripture Teach a Rapture?
    Unit 3: The 70th Week of Daniel
    • Daniel 9 and Premillennialism
    • Reconstructing End Times Chronology
    • Is Jesus “the Anointed One” in Daniel 9?
    • Two Assumptions in Daniel 9
    • Understanding the “Anointed One”
    • Summarizing the 70th Week Issues
    Unit 4: Has the Church Replaced Israel?
    • The Church and Israel: End Times Prophecy
    • Who Are the People of God?
    • The Abrahamic Covenant and the Salvation of Israel
    • The Salvation of Israel and the Second Coming
    • Summarizing the Discussion
    Unit 5: Literal vs. Nonliteral Interpretation
    • Considering the Interpretation of Prophecy
    • Example of Non-Literal Interpretation
    • A Christological Interpretation of Amos 9
    • Summarizing the Discussion

    Dr. Michael S. Heiser is a Scholar-in-Residence for Faithlife Corporation, the makers of Logos Bible Software. His varied academic background enables him to operate in the realm of critical scholarship and the wider Christian community. His experience in teaching at the undergraduate level and writing for the layperson both directly contribute to Logos’ goal of adapting scholarly tools for nonspecialists.

    Dr. Heiser earned his PhD in Hebrew Bible and Semitic languages and holds and MA in ancient history and Hebrew studies. He is the coeditor of Old Testament Greek Pseudepigrapha with Morphology and Semitic Inscriptions: Analyzed Texts and English Translations, and can do translation work in roughly a dozen ancient languages, including Biblical Hebrew, Greek, Aramaic, Egyptian hieroglyphs, and Ugaritic cuneiform. He also specializes in Israelite religion (especially Israel’s divine council), contextualizing biblical theology with Israelite and ancient Near Eastern religion, Jewish binitarianism, biblical languages, ancient Semitic languages, textual criticism, comparative philology, and Second Temple period Jewish literature. In addition, he was named the 2007 Pacific Northwest Regional Scholar by the Society of Biblical Literature.

    BI172 Problems in Bible Interpretation: Why Do Christians Disagree about Baptism?

    • Instructor: Michael S. Heiser
    • Publication Date: 2017
    • Video Hours: 3

    In Problems in Bible Interpretation: Why Do Christians Disagree on Baptism? (BI172), Dr. Michael Heiser highlights the fundamental areas of debate concerning an important rite of the church. Then he identifies a common cause for these disagreements—namely, unclear language regarding the relationship between baptism and salvation. He examines three of the most prominent historic confessions of the Reformed tradition in order to understand where the confusion originates from. To help us sort through these issues, Dr. Heiser offers a key hermeneutical principle, which can enable us to better articulate a clear and biblical defense of baptism (infant or adult) as well as justify a particular mode of baptism—whether sprinkling, pouring, or immersion—without violating the purity of the gospel of Jesus.

    Contents:

    Introduction
    • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
    Unit 1: Issues Related to the Recipients
    • Reasons for Disagreements
    • Infant Baptism in the Reformed Tradition
    • Problems with the Reformed View of Baptism
    • The Belgic Confession: Part One
    • The Belgic Confession: Part Two
    • The Belgic Confession: Part Three
    • The Heidelberg Catechism: Part One
    • The Heidelberg Catechism: Part Two
    • The Heidelberg Catechism: Part Three
    • The Westminster Confession
    Unit 2: Solutions to the Problem of Recipient and Rationale
    • Framing the Discussion in Light of Colossians 2:8–12
    • The Fundamental Question
    • What Circumcision Did Not Accomplish
    • What Circumcision Did Accomplish
    • Membership in the Covenant Community
    • Implications for the Church
    Unit 3: Issues Related to the Mode of Baptism
    • Overview of the Argument
    • Other Meanings for Baptizō
    • What’s More Important—Motion or Result?
    Unit 4: Application to Controversial Passages
    • The Hermeneutical Key
    • Acts 2:38 and Acts 22:16
    Conclusion
    • Course Summary

    Dr. Michael S. Heiser is a Scholar-in-Residence for Faithlife Corporation, the makers of Logos Bible Software. His varied academic background enables him to operate in the realm of critical scholarship and the wider Christian community. His experience in teaching at the undergraduate level and writing for the layperson both directly contribute to Logos’ goal of adapting scholarly tools for nonspecialists.

    Dr. Heiser earned his PhD in Hebrew Bible and Semitic languages and holds and MA in ancient history and Hebrew studies. He is the coeditor of Old Testament Greek Pseudepigrapha with Morphology and Semitic Inscriptions: Analyzed Texts and English Translations, and can do translation work in roughly a dozen ancient languages, including Biblical Hebrew, Greek, Aramaic, Egyptian hieroglyphs, and Ugaritic cuneiform. He also specializes in Israelite religion (especially Israel’s divine council), contextualizing biblical theology with Israelite and ancient Near Eastern religion, Jewish binitarianism, biblical languages, ancient Semitic languages, textual criticism, comparative philology, and Second Temple period Jewish literature. In addition, he was named the 2007 Pacific Northwest Regional Scholar by the Society of Biblical Literature.

    BI173 Problems in Bible Interpretation: Why Do Christians Disagree about the Bible?

    • Instructor: Michael S. Heiser
    • Publication Date: 2017
    • Video Hours: 4

    Christians believe the Bible is God’s Word, but the specific implications behind what that means are debated. In Problems in Bible Interpretation: Why Do Christians Disagree about the Bible? (BI173), Dr. Michael Heiser examines the issues of inspiration, inerrancy, and the canon. He explores different views on what role human authors played in the writings found in the Bible and how they were inspired by God. Then he moves on to address several questions surrounding the doctrine of inerrancy: What does the term mean? How have Christians understood it historically? What constitutes an “error”? Finally, he looks at the books included in the Bible, or the canon, and how it came to be. Through a discussion of the historical development of the Christian canon, he explains the reasons why various traditions regard different books as authoritative.

    Contents:

    Introduction
    • Introducing the Speaker and the Course
    Unit 1: Inspiration
    • Millard Erickson’s Five Categories
    • Dynamic, Verbal, Dictation
    • Human and Divine Element of Inspiration
    Unit 2: Inerrancy
    • What Does Inerrancy Mean?
    • Historical Positions: Part 1
    • Historical Positions: Part 2
    • Inerrancy: Part 1
    • Inerrancy: Part 2
    • Historical Positions
    • Struggle
    Unit 3: What Is an Error?
    • Specific Difficulties
    • Israelite Cosmology
    • The Waters above and below the Heavens
    • “God’s Eye” View of the Created World
    • Point
    • Primitive Conception of Conception: Part 1
    • Primitive Conception of Conception: Part 2
    • Prophecies that Don’t Happen
    • Number Discrepancies: Part 1
    • Number Discrepancies: Part 2
    • Number Discrepancies: Part 3
    • New Testament Citation of Old Testament
    • Differences in Gospels: Dialogue
    • Differences in Gospels: Narrative Elements
    • Editorial Hands
    • How Do We Define Inspiration and Inerrancy?
    Unit 4: Canon
    • Disagreement over What Books Should Be Recognized as Inspired
    • Complicating Factors
    • Protestant, Catholic, Eastern Orthodox Canon
    • New Testament Canon
    • 1 Enoch—Special Case: Part 1
    • 1 Enoch—Special Case: Part 2
    Conclusion
    • Conclusion to the Course

    Dr. Michael S. Heiser is a Scholar-in-Residence for Faithlife Corporation, the makers of Logos Bible Software. His varied academic background enables him to operate in the realm of critical scholarship and the wider Christian community. His experience in teaching at the undergraduate level and writing for the layperson both directly contribute to Logos’ goal of adapting scholarly tools for nonspecialists.

    Dr. Heiser earned his PhD in Hebrew Bible and Semitic languages and holds and MA in ancient history and Hebrew studies. He is the coeditor of Old Testament Greek Pseudepigrapha with Morphology and Semitic Inscriptions: Analyzed Texts and English Translations, and can do translation work in roughly a dozen ancient languages, including Biblical Hebrew, Greek, Aramaic, Egyptian hieroglyphs, and Ugaritic cuneiform. He also specializes in Israelite religion (especially Israel’s divine council), contextualizing biblical theology with Israelite and ancient Near Eastern religion, Jewish binitarianism, biblical languages, ancient Semitic languages, textual criticism, comparative philology, and Second Temple period Jewish literature. In addition, he was named the 2007 Pacific Northwest Regional Scholar by the Society of Biblical Literature.

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