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Overview

This Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary collection is filled with pointed insights for pastors, teachers, and scholars. This series also contains helpful explanation that makes it accessible to a wide audience. In each volume, readers will find expert guidance that promotes theological reflection. “Connections” are special sections that relate Biblical teaching to common theological questions from modern readers. Contributors base their instruction on current research in archaeology, critical scholarship, enlightening discussion of original languages, and include practical helps that facilitate living out the Christian life in community.

With Logos Bible Software, these valuable volumes are enhanced by cutting-edge research tools. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Powerful topical searches help you find exactly what you’re looking for. Tablet and mobile apps let you take the discussion with you. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Art, maps, and other visuals provide a clear presentation of each text’s background cultural setting
  • Includes contributions from notable scholars including Walter Brueggemann and Ben Witherington III
  • Provides a wide survey of commentary on important biblical texts

Product Details

  • Title: Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary Collection
  • General Editor: Samuel E. Balentine
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Volumes: 34
  • Pages: 16,955
  • Resource Type: Commentaries
  • Topic: Biblical Studies

Individual Titles

Exodus 1–19

  • Author: William Johnstone
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 512

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Ten Commandments stand at the center of the book of Exodus and provide the key for understanding its purpose. They refer to the story in Exodus chapters 1–19 of God’s identity and what He has done for Israel. The Ten Commandments also refer forward to what God expects of Israel in response, as the second half of Exodus explains in chapters 20–40. This commentary by William Johnstone approaches the literary structure of Exodus and draws out implications for readers.

The Ten Commandments also provide guidance about how to read the book of Exodus. Moses’ recollection of the Ten Commandments that in Deuteronomy chapter five differs in several respects from those in Exodus chapter twenty. The differences between these books concern vital matters like covenant, law, and festivals. Johnstone argues that these differences are not to be glossed over but that their existence provides evidence of a dialogue between two voices running throughout the texts of Exodus and Deuteronomy. Dialogue, he explains, is central to the formation and interpretation of Scripture and is essential to the ways in which humans attempt to speak about God.

William Johnstone is emeritus professor of Hebrew & Semitic languages, University of Aberdeen, and an ordained minister of the Church of Scotland. He is a graduate in Divinity and in Hebrew and Arabic from the University of Glasgow, Scotland, and studied at the University of Marburg, Germany. He participated in archaeological excavations at Ras Shamra/Ugarit in Syria and at Enkomi/Alasia in Cyprus and was epigraphist to the Marsala Punic Ship expedition, Sicily. His main research interest in the field of Hebrew Bible has lain in the analogy that Chronicles provides for the composition of the Pentateuch. He has published a collection of essays on the subject and a two-volume commentary on Chronicles, as well as contributing the volume on Exodus in the Sheffield Old Testament Study Guides. This two-part commentary on Exodus completes that circle of studies.

Exodus 20–40

  • Author: William Johnstone
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 544

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This timely commentary on the second half of Exodus is written by William Johnstone. In it, he explains that the Ten Commandments refer forward to what God expects of Israel in response, as the second half of Exodus explains in chapters 20–40. As in his commentary on the first half of Exodus, Johnstone connects the theme of dialogue to the book of Deuteronomy.

William Johnstone is emeritus professor of Hebrew & Semitic languages, University of Aberdeen, and an ordained minister of the Church of Scotland. He is a graduate in Divinity and in Hebrew and Arabic from the University of Glasgow, Scotland, and studied at the University of Marburg, Germany. He participated in archaeological excavations at Ras Shamra/Ugarit in Syria and at Enkomi/Alasia in Cyprus and was epigraphist to the Marsala Punic Ship expedition, Sicily. His main research interest in the field of Hebrew Bible has lain in the analogy that Chronicles provides for the composition of the Pentateuch. He has published a collection of essays on the subject and a two-volume commentary on Chronicles, as well as contributing the volume on Exodus in the Sheffield Old Testament Study Guides. This two-part commentary on Exodus completes that circle of studies.

Leviticus–Numbers

  • Author: Lloyd R. Bailey
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 648

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The contrast between the assessment of Leviticus and Numbers by the synagogue on the one hand, and by the church on the other, is little short of astonishing. The former has considered it crucial to an understanding of God and of the nature of the chosen people of Israel. The latter has usually reduced it to allegory or as a mere historical record of Israelite religion. In this new volume, Hebrew Bible scholar Lloyd R. Bailey examines these often overlooked or under-appreciated books of Moses in the contexts of both the Jewish and Christian traditions.

Lloyd R. Bailey, Sr., is a retired professor of Hebrew Bible at the Divinity School, Duke University and now serves as Barrow Professor of Religion at Mount Olive College and as adjunct professor of religion at Methodist College. He is a United Methodist clergyman, author of fifteen books, more than seventy articles in encyclopedias and journals, has numerous television appearances in documenteries on the Bible, and has served as president of the Society of Biblical Literature.

Deuteronomy

  • Author: Mark E. Biddle
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 536

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Deuteronomy is the fifth and arguably the most influential book of the Pentateuch. This text preserves the three addresses Moses delivered to the people of Israel just prior to his death and their entry into the Promised Land. Its name, which means “second law,” represented a reiteration, explication, and, to a degree, expansion, of the sole covenant between God and Israel. Deuteronomy was a reinterpretation of the law designed to meet the needs of a new generation facing a new future. In this volume of the groundbreaking Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary series, Old Testament scholar Mark Biddle skillfully leads his readers to consider how these words which might confuse a casual reader are useful to help Christians understand and meet the needs of our own generation as well.

Mark E. Biddle is professor of Old Testament at Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond. His other publications include A Redaction History of Jeremiah 2:1-4:2TVZ, Polyphony and Symphony: Rereading Jeremiah 7-20 (Mercer), numerous articles, and several translations.

Ruth & Esther

  • Author: Kandy Queen-Sutherland
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 544

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Ruth and Esther are the only two women for whom books of the Hebrew Bible are named. This distinction in itself sets the books apart from other biblical texts that bear male names, address the community through its male members, recall the workings of God and human history through a predominately male perspective, and look to the future through male heirs. These books are particular stories of survival. The story of Ruth focuses on the survival of a family, Esther on the survival of a people.

As biblical characters, Ruth and Esther are women of their own times—and prove to be archetypal women for all times. Each conforms to the cultural norms of their story’s setting while pressing against boundaries of domination and privilege that limit female and outsider participation. As female characters, Ruth and Esther stand in a long line of biblical women who emerge as heroes in their stories. Each is a part of ancient Israel’s larger story of what it means to live as people of God.

This commentary assembles a rich collection of materials and sets them in conversation—and even in disputation—with the books of Ruth and Esther. New insights emerge here from sustained attention to the various canonical contexts of both books: this volume will enliven its readers’ study not only of Ruth and Esther, but of all five of the Megillot.

—Jennie Grillo, assistant professor of Old Testament, Duke Divinity School

Kandy Queen-Sutherland is Sam R. Marks Professor of Religious Studies at Stetson University in DeLand, Florida, where she has taught for the last 25 years. Previously, she taught at the Baptist Theological Seminary in Rüschlikon, Switzerland, where she was Professor of Old Testament. She earned a BS from Winthrop College (1973) and MDiv and PhD from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (1976, 1982). She did post-doctoral work at the University of Zürich. During her years in Rüschlikon, she spoke widely across both eastern and western Europe, often the first woman to lecture and preach in Baptist contexts. She maintains her international interests as a frequent teacher of study-abroad courses in Europe and the Middle East. At Stetson University, she continues to teach and do research on the intersection between gender realities and the Bible.

1 & 2 Samuel

  • Author: Tony W. Cartledge
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 748

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Like the highly successful initial volume in the Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary Series, Walter Brueggemann’s 1 & 2 Kings, this volume explores the beginnings of kingship in Israel. Tony Cartledge author thoughtfully considers the debt that our religious and literary heritage owes to the books of 1 & 2 Samuel, including the counsel of Samuel, the determination of Saul, and the towering figure of David. The author describes and analyzes the events in these books as central to the preservation of the Hebrew and Christian traditions. Written as a textual commentary, this edition also includes numerous insights and visuals drawn from the worlds of art, archaeology, literature, history, and geography. His valuable treatment of 1 & 2 Samuel challenges readers of the biblical text to approach the books of Samuel with eyes of faith.

Tony Cartledge has produced a commentary on 1 and 2 Samuel that is readable by any interested and educated person, with or without theological training. The commentary is informed by, but not bound to the results of critical scholarship. It does not hide from problematic texts, but judges them by the later revelation in Jesus. It is a worthy addition to the series.

—Paul L. Redditt, chair, Department of Religion, Georgetown College

The new Smyth and Helwys Bible Commentary, 1 & 2 Samuel, is a refreshing study of the stories about the early days of kingship in ancient Israel. Tony Cartledge combines an outstanding scholarly treatment of the text with insightful applications to the twenty-first-century world. 1 & 2 Samuel is an excellent companion volume to its Bible Commentary predecessor, 1 & 2 Kings, and will be a necessary addition to libraries and studies and a valuable classroom tool.

—Nancy L. deClaissé-Walford, associate professor of Old Testament and biblical languages, McAfee School of Theology; managing editor, the Review and Expositor

Tony Cartledge is professor of Old Testament at Campbell University Divinity School. He is the author of 1 & 2 Samuel (Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary series), Telling Stories: Tall Tales and Deep Truths, Sessions with Samuel: Stories from the Edge, and Intrigued, How I Love to Proclaim It: Adventures in Theological Thinking. He is coauthor with Jan Rush of A Whole New World: Life After Bethany and Job: Into the Fire, Out of the Ashes (Smyth & Helwys Annual Bible Study).

1 & 2 Kings

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Pages: 646

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this commentary, Walter Brueggemann considers the artistry of 1 & 2 Kings as it mediates between history and faith. He develops a theme around how the Old Testament provides peculiarly powerful ways of thinking and seeing God’s reality. He also points to issues of power in ancient texts that is still prevalent today.

In this narrative treatment of the text, a special focus is placed upon Solomon, Elijah, Elisha, and Josiah as models of faith. Brueggemann provides a useful guide for the reader to maneuver between flat history and the dynamism of faith.

Like all volumes in the Smyth & Helwys Commentary Series, 1 & 2 Kings provides a wealth of visuals, including photography, classic works of art, and maps. These provide a depth of explanation that support the task of interpretation.

Walter Brueggemann is the William Marcellus McPheddeis Professor of Old Testament at Columbia Seminary in Decatur, Georgia. He is past president of the Society of Biblical Literature and the author of numerous books.

Ezra-Nehemiah

  • Author: Paul L. Redditt
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 384

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Ezra-Nehemiah describes events that occurred between 539 and 432 BCE, but the books themselves were written between 432 and 200 BCE. Though these books describe early events and perhaps incorporates authentic memoirs of Nehemiah, they also contain redacted lists, narratives, and thinking about that crucial century in the life of post-exilic Judah and its neighbors. In addition, these accounts record both the successes and the excesses of three waves of returnees. The task of rebuilding and dealing with the effects of being exiled are major themes discussed by the commentator. For a modern audience, examining these difficulties and relating them to modern struggles is an essential part of the Christian faith. This volume is filled with relatable observations and a helpful interpretation of Jewish history.

Paul L. Redditt is emeritus professor of religion at Georgetown College and taught part-time at the Baptist Seminary of Kentucky. He earned his BA from Ouachita Baptist University (1963), MDiv from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (1967), and MA and PhD from Vanderbilt University (1971, 1972). During his time at Vanderbilt, he studied one year at the Eberhard Karls University in Tubingen, Germany. He has published extensively on the Minor Prophets (particularly Joel, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi) and on the book of Daniel and apocalyptic literature. Given the temporal connections between those biblical books and Ezra/Nehemiah, he has long held an academic interest in that literature as well.

Job

  • Author: Samuel E. Balentine
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 714

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of Job is considered by many to be the crown jewel of biblical literature. It centers on the central theme of Job’s struggle. Samuel Balentine presents the book of Job as a truly astonishing declaration about what it means to live in a world where order breaks down and chaos runs amok, where the innocent suffer and the wicked thrive, where cries for help go unanswered. He leads readers on an in-depth and far-reaching look at the nature of the book of Job. Balentine also helpfully examines various attempts by many others who have explored Job’s essential struggle.

Samuel Balentine is a highly regarded scholar who served on the faculty of Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond for 10 years. Balentine joined the Union-PSCE faculty in September 2004. He is the author of four books, has edited or coedited numerous books and scholarly journals, and has written nearly three dozen articles for significant journals in biblical studies. Prior to joining the faculty of Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond, Balentine served as a professor at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary and Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Along with authoring the volume on Job, Balentine is general editor of the Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary series, coeditor of Interpretation, and a member of the editorial board for The New Interpreters Dictionary of the Bible.

Proverbs-Ecclesiastes

  • Author: Milton P. Horne
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 580

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Drawing from the most recent scholarly studies in the books of Proverbs and Ecclesiastes, this commentary promotes deep theological reflection. In addition to the imaginative artwork used for illustration, readers will find a broad appeal to contemporary literature and authors as touchstones for applied reflection. These books both use universal concepts and images and lack a particularistic appeal to ancient Israel's nationalistic story. These examples of wisdom literature in the Hebrew Bible may be some of the most relevant Biblical writing for our contemporary setting. For this reason readers are invited to recontextualize the wise council of Israel's ancient sages through the perspectives of contemporary literature.

Milton P. Horne is professor of religion at William Jewell College, where he has taught in the religion department since 1986. In addition to teaching, Horne provided the college with curricular leadership from 1995-2001 as associate dean for general education, coordinating Jewell’s integrated, interdisciplinary “Responsible Self” general education curriculum. His present position with the Partee Center for Baptist Historical Studies aims to expand the center’s work to include an educational initiative on Christian faith and Liberal Arts Education.

Isaiah 1–39

  • Author: Patricia K. Tull
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 605

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The prophet Isaiah’s influence extended from his long career in Jerusalem in the late eighth century BCE through Judah’s exilic and Second Temple periods. For both Jews and Christians, Isaiah’s words have heavily influenced later theological writings, liturgies, lectionaries, hymns, poetry, and art. Among early Christian writings, Isaiah was seen as evangelist rather than prophet, foretelling Christ’s birth, life, death, and resurrection—a view that continues to prevail today. This happens despite scholars’ long arguing that Isaiah addressed his own time and not the distant future.

Readers of Tull’s engaging commentary will come to understand Isaiah as visionary spokesperson of ancient Jerusalem’s God. Preachers, teachers, and students will gain fresh connections between their modern setting and this ancient book. They will learn about the paths the book traveled as it grew, absorbed new meanings, and underwent reinterpretation. In this process, the book of Isaiah eventually emerged as Scripture for synagogues and churches.

Patricia K. Tull is A.B. Rhodes Professor Emerita of Old Testament at Louisville Presbyterian Seminary. She is coeditor of As Those Who Are Taught: The Interpretation of Isaiah from the LXX to the SBL and author of Remember the Former Things: The Recollection of Previous Texts in Second Isaiah, as well as of other publications on Psalms, Ruth, Esther, 1–2 Samuel, Christian-Jewish relations, and scriptural interpretation. An ordained Presbyterian minister, she has served churches in Texas and Illinois, and continues to lead travelers to the Middle East and to preach and teach in a variety of venues.

Jeremiah

  • Author: Terence E. Fretheim
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 684

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of Jeremiah is arguably the longest and most complex book in the Bible. Jeremiah focuses on divine action and human response. The range and rigor of its rhetoric and the initial promise of the “new covenant” has left its mark on both the Old and New Testaments.

This prophetic book presents many difficult literary, historical, and theological issues. In this volume of the highly successful Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary Series, renowned Old Testament scholar Terence Fretheim expertly leads his readers through the difficulties to present the message of Jeremiah as one of grace and hope for today's world. After a lengthy introduction, Fretheim’s commentary presents the text in sections and focuses on literary and theological issues. His thoughtful reflections are useful for teaching God’s message from the pulpit.

After a long absence of Jeremiah commentaries, we are currently happily experiencing a revival in Jeremiah studies and a variety of new commentaries. Among the more important of these is this offer by Terence Fretheim, perhaps the premier biblical expositor of his generation. Fretheim is thoroughly grounded in critical study; but his commentary is no weary repetition of that learning. Here speaks a lively believer attentive to the current world and convinced of the pertinence of the texts to that world. The welcome outcome is an effective connection between text and world made by Fretheim as well as can be made by any contemporary interpreter. Fretheim’s contribution is a major presence in the new Smyth & Helwys commentary series that holds immense promise for critical, faithful exposition.

—Walter Brueggemann, Columbia Theological Seminary

This perceptive commentary benefits from Terence Fretheim’s attention to theological substance and to stylistic detail. Readers will be well served by his mediating position between maximalist and minimalist interpretations of the book of Jeremiah, as well as by the rich analysis of the prophet’s understanding of God.

—James L. Crenshaw, Duke University Divinity School

Terence Fretheim’s commentary makes the book of Jeremiah accessible and appealing for readers at this crucial time in our history. Like no other commentary, this one illuminates the suffering of God and the suffering of creation in the book of Jeremiah. Fretheim draws out from the text the interconnections of human actions, political realities, and ecological well-being. He calls Jeremiah an assaulter of the mind, a champion of the poor, and a prophet of divine anguish. Balanced scholarly judgment characterizes this commentary. Fretheim finds in the figure of the prophet neither a fiction nor a precise historical character but a persona who embodies God’s voice, God’s pathos, and God’s love. The commentary is beautifully written, clearly designed, and sprinkled liberally with interpretive voices and perspectives other than Fretheim’s own. The book will make a wonderful companion for any reader of Jeremiah, and this biblical text will be a central resource for the work of recovery and critical analysis after the September 11th tragedy.

—Kathleen M. O’Connor, Columbia Theological Seminary

Few interpreters of Scripture go so quickly and well to the heart of the matter as does Terence Fretheim. Nowhere is that more clearly demonstrated than in his clear and articulate comment on the book of Jeremiah. Fretheim’s long wrestling with the God of the Old Testament has been brought to bear effectively on his interpretation of that ancient God-wrestler, Jeremiah. If one wants to hear the word of the Lord afresh in the study of this most important prophet, Fretheim’s commentary gives the reader a whole new set of ears for careful listening.

—Patrick D. Miller, Princeton Theological Seminary

Terence E. Fretheim is Elva B. Lovell Professor of Old Testament Emeritus at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota. He graduated from Luther College (BA, 1956), Luther Theological Seminary (BD, 1960), and Princeton Theological Seminary (PhD, 1967). He has taught at Augsburg College and Theological Seminary (1961–1963, 1967–1968) and Luther Seminary (1968–2013). Through the years he has taught for shorter periods of time at several theological schools in the US and also abroad (Malaysia; Hong Kong; Cairo). He has been a speaker at numerous church gatherings across the country. He is the author of 23 books, including Jeremiah in the Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary Series.

Ezekiel

  • Author: Margaret S. Odell
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 566

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of Ezekiel is organized around three major visions. This prophetic book describes God’s action as king of wayward Israel. Through symbolic acts, the prophet Ezekiel is so closely identified with divine judgment that his life becomes a mirror of the judgment itself. His first vision gives him a glimpse of the cosmos under the rule of God and inaugurates him into his role as a prophet. This commentary presents clear descriptions of historical events for modern readers and relates ancient prophecy for contemporary ministry settings.

Margaret S. Odell is associate professor of religion at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota. In her writing and teaching, she explores the way in which the writings of the Bible reflect a creative response to cultural and political crises in the ancient world.

Daniel

  • Author: Sharon Pace
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of Daniel showcases the tragic experience and memories of Israel. This collection of stories and visions is useful as a God honoring archetype for people groups weighed down by suffering. Dr. Sharon Pace’s superb analysis and commentary reveal that from the depths of despair comes a faith that refuses to abandon God. Daniel boldly declared, through the eyes of faith, that the suffering of the righteous matters. He knew that God hears the voices of the hurting and that His divine plan is for their ultimate good.

Sharon Pace (PhD, University of Notre Dame) specializes in the study of the Hebrew Bible as an associate professor in the department of theology at Marquette University. She is the winner of a NEH Humanities Summer Seminar fellowship and the Catholic Biblical Association’s Young Scholar Award. She is the author of articles in the Bulletin of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies, Biblical Theology Bulletin, Biblical Research, The Bible Today, and has published two prior books: The Old Greek Translation of Daniel 7–12 and The Women of Genesis: From Sarah to Potiphar’s Wife.

The Book of the Twelve: Hosea–Jonah

  • Author: James D. Nogalski
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 512

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This commentary focuses on the books of Hosea through Jonah, focusing on their contents in light of the Minor Prophets as a whole. Over the last thirty years, biblical scholars have explored the implications of an ancient Jewish and Christian tradition that referred to the Minor Prophets as “the Twelve.” Scholarly work on the Book of the Twelve in the last quarter century has focused on developing models of how these texts came to be recorded on a single scroll and on identifying points of unity within the single collection. Nogalski’s comprehensive and accessible commentary offers an overview of ancient traditions concerning the Book of the Twelve. He also explains this scholarly perspective and presents findings and their implications for modern readers.

James D. Nogalski grew up in Missouri, Oklahoma, and Kentucky. After graduating Samford University he completed a Master of Divinity degree at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, before traveling to Zürich, Switzerland, where he completed a Master of Theology in Old Testament at the Baptist Theological Seminary in Rüschlikon and his doctoral degree at the University of Zurich. His dissertation was published in two volumes and deals with the redaction history of the Book of the Twelve. Nogalski taught at institutions in South Carolina, Kentucky, Illinois, and North Carolina before joining the faculty of the religion department at Baylor in fall 2007.

The Book of the Twelve: Micah–Malachi

  • Author: James D. Nogalski
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 656

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This commentary focuses on the books of Micah through Malachi, focusing on their contents in light of the Minor Prophets as a whole. Over the last thirty years, biblical scholars have explored the implications of an ancient Jewish and Christian tradition that referred to the Minor Prophets as “the Twelve.” Nogalski’s comprehensive and accessible commentary offers an overview of ancient traditions concerning the Book of the Twelve. He also explains this scholarly perspective and presents findings and their implications for modern readers.

James D. Nogalski grew up in Missouri, Oklahoma, and Kentucky. After graduating Samford University he completed a Master of Divinity degree at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, before traveling to Zürich, Switzerland, where he completed a Master of Theology in Old Testament at the Baptist Theological Seminary in Rüschlikon and his doctoral degree at the University of Zurich. His dissertation was published in two volumes and deals with the redaction history of the Book of the Twelve. Nogalski taught at institutions in South Carolina, Kentucky, Illinois, and North Carolina before joining the faculty of the religion department at Baylor in fall 2007.

Matthew

  • Author: Ben Witherington III
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 592

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

When the biblical canon was solidified in the fourth century, Matthew was the most popular and widely-used gospel for many reasons. In the Western church, reasons include the special role it assigned to Peter in relationship to the community of Christ. This gospel was also popular because it begins with a genealogy of Jesus. The gospel of Matthew also contains a more detailed resurrection account than is found in the Gospel of Mark.

Ben Witherington III is a renowned author of more than thirty books on the New Testament. In this commentary, he describes the fullness of the Christian life for those who study and obey the teachings of Jesus in the book of Matthew. As with each volume in this series, Witherington’s groundbreaking new commentary connects the insights of biblical scholarship to a practical exploration of the Christian life.

The prolific Evangelical scholar Ben Witherington turns his attention here to the Gospel of Matthew in a substantial new commentary in the distinctive Smyth & Helwys series. Aimed at teachers, pastors, seminarians, and interested laity, this commentary series provides a very attractive format and one geared for enjoyable study of the text—including appropriate and abundant art and illustrations, charts and sidebars with supplementary information, and a DC for further research leads. Witherington’s commentary is well-informed and provides a clear and pastorally sensitive exposition of the text. He surmises that the Gospel may have originated in Galilee, where the conditions implied in the Gospel might best be situated—a contestable theory but one that does not detract from the quality of the commentary.

—Donald Senior, The Bible Today

Ben Witherington III is professor of New Testament interpretation at Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, Kentucky. A graduate of UNC–Chapel Hill, he went on to receive the MDiv degree from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and a PhD from the University of Durham, England. He is now considered one of the top evangelical scholars in the world and has written over thirty books, including The Jesus Quest and The Paul Quest, both of which were selected as top biblical studies works by Christianity Today.

Mark

  • Author: R. Alan Culpepper
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 640

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Mark is at the center of a scholarly debate about the nature of the Gospels and their relationship to one another. The history of Markan scholarship offers a privileged overview of basic issues in the study of the Gospels as a whole. Studying the gospel of Mark this way also provides an orientation to introductory questions of authorship, provenance, and purpose. This commentary provides deep discussion of one of the pillars of the Christian faith and tradition. Culpepper highlights Markan themes and makes numerous cross-references between related passages. He leads his readers deep into source material that remains endlessly fascinating, inspiring, and pivotal for our understanding of Jesus.

This is a large book in many respects. It is large in conception—it includes a large fund of relevant material drawn from ancient primary sources as well as more modern secondary sources. It is large in scope—it covers the message of Mark from its meaning in its own time to the way modern interpreters can go about making that message their own. It is large in execution—it begins with an introduction that is an excellent survey of Markan scholarship, and contains a multitude of side-bars that provide helpful cultural, geographic, and theological information. It is, in sum, an excellent commentary on the first Gospel that will richly reward the careful reader: preacher, scholar, and student alike.

—Paul J. Achtemeier, Union Theological Seminary and Presbyterian School of Christian Education

Alan Culpepper’s commentary on Mark is creative, innovative, and user-friendly. In short, it is outstanding. It belongs in the library of every pastor, student, and scholar. I recommend it highly.

—Craig A. Evans, Acadia Divinity College

Alan Culpepper reads Mark with an eye for the literary sophistication and for the theological meaning of the text. This volume, with its helpful ‘connections’ comments will be welcome in the library of every preacher and teacher of the Bible.

—Sharyn Dowd, author, Reading Mark

R. Alan Culpepper holds degrees from Baylor University, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and Duke University. He is the founding dean of the McAfee School of Theology at Mercer University in Atlanta, Georgia. Before coming to Mercer, Alan taught New Testament at Southern Baptist Theological seminary and at Baylor University. He has written extensively about the Gospels, and some of his works include The Johannine School, Anatomy of the Fourth Gospel, John the Son of Zebedee: The Life of a Legend, “The Gospel of Luke,” in the New Interpreter’s Bible series, and The Gospel and Letters of John. He is the New Testament general editor of the Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary series and lives in Stone Mountain, Georgia.

Luke

  • Author: Richard B. Vinson
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 816

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The Gospel of Luke narrates the life of Jesus. It includes accounts from the nativity, Jesus’ baptism and temptation, His ministry in Galilee, His teaching in Jerusalem, and includes His death and resurrection. In this engaging guide to Luke’s gospel, Richard Vinson accompanies readers on a journey through the life of Christ and utilizes the lenses of critical scholarship and contemporary culture. As a result, Luke’s primary themes are seen more clearly. These include the good news of the Kingdom of God, Jesus’ emphatic teachings on wealth and poverty, repentance and forgiveness, and the role of women in Jesus’ ministry.

Richard B. Vinson was educated at Samford University, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and Duke University. He has served churches in Alabama, Nebraska, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Virginia. Vinson taught at Averett University in Danville, Virginia, where he was dean of arts and sciences for five years, and at Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond, where he was dean of the faculty. Vinson currently is a visiting professor in the department of religion at Salem College in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Acts

  • Author: J. Bradley Chance
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 640

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The Acts of the Apostles explores the story of the early church, from its inception in Jerusalem to its continued existence in the Roman Empire. The early church firmly believed that it was not a new religion, but the realization and fulfillment of Judaism. However, as the church lived out its mission as the fulfillment of its own religious heritage, it had to learn to reach beyond the comfortable boundaries of its own Jewish traditions. Central to the fulfillment of the hopes of Scripture was the incorporation of all persons, Jews and non-Jews, into the people of God. This commentary explores this important broadening of the mission of God and brings lessons for modern Christians to continue the expansion through obedience.

Prof. J. Bradley Chance has written an intelligent, informed, illuminating, and accessible commentary on The Acts of the Apostles. This work is a fine addition to the already impressive Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary series. Professional scholars and students alike will find themselves in Chance’s debt as they use this volume to further their study of Acts.

—Marion L. Soards, professor of New Testament studies, Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary

Chance’s solid scholarship provides insightful observations upon the historical and narrative world of the Acts of the Apostles. His interpretations, clear writing style, and ability to find analogies present a fresh reading of this often neglected New Testament work. Chance excels in uniting the biblical world of our ancestors in faith with the world of contemporary Christians. This commentary reflects an author who has thoroughly engaged Acts on both a critical and personal level. Chance is to be commended for an outstanding addition to the Smyth and Helwys commentary series.

—David M. May, professor of New Testament, Central Baptist Theological Seminary, Shawnee, KS

Followers of Jesus have, for two millennia, looked to The Book of Acts for guidance and inspiration about how to live faithfully and missionally in the face of changing cultures and unexpected challenges. J. Bradley Chance helps us listen wisely and deeply to the text, inviting us to hear through it the contemporary voice of the Spirit. His commentary is grounded in thorough familiarity with the work of other scholars, but there is also a refreshing originality in his reading of Acts, especially in his connecting of ‘then’ and ‘now’—of ‘there’ and ‘here.’

—Guy Sayles, pastor, First Baptist Church of Asheville, NC

J. Bradley Chance completed all of his post-secondary education in the Tar Heel state, receiving an AB, with a major in religion, from UNC-Chapel Hill (1975), an MDiv from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary (1978), and a PhD from Duke University, focusing on Christian Origins (1984). While doing his work at Duke, Chance served as an Adjunctive Instructor of New Testament at Southeastern Seminary (1978-1982). He joined the faculty of William Jewell College, Liberty, MO, as an Instructor of Religion in 1982. Chance still continues to serve at William Jewell as Professor of Religion and Chair of the Department, in addition to other administrative responsibilities.

Chance is the author of one monograph, Jerusalem, the Temple, and the New Age in Luke-Acts (Mercer University Press, 1988) and one textbook on biblical introduction, Rereading the Bible: An Introduction to the Biblical Story (Prentice-Hall, 1999), which he coauthored with Milton Horne, also a contributor to the Smyth & Helwys Commentary Series. Chance has contributed a number of articles dealing with the New Testament and matters of pedagogy to various journals, Bible dictionaries, and collections of essays.

Romans

  • Author: Charles H. Talbert
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 360

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Romans was written to help reconcile Jewish and Gentile Christians in Rome. Paul’s aim was to unify these two sub-groups. In his letter, he presented a theology that placed Jew and Gentile on an equal footing, both in their sin and in their salvation. Modern Christians understand that our own situation corresponds to Paul’s original setting. Although the content of Romans was intended for a particular cultural context, its applicability extends to all times for God’s people. Distinguished biblical scholar Charles Talbert leads readers into the biblical world of Paul’s Letter to the Romans. He seeks to attune his readers’ ears to the important truth of God’s word for today.

Charles H. Talbert is distinguished professor of religion at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. He serves as editor of the Reading the New Testament series and is author of Reading Luke, Reading John, Reading Acts, and Reading Corinthians in that series.

1 Corinthians

  • Author: Robert Scott Nash
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 486

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The book of First Corinthians offers readers a window to the life of the early church in Corinth. Through Paul’s corrective letter, readers catch a glimpse of a faith community struggling with questions of identity, relationship, belief, and practice. Modern interpreters are presented only the issues that Paul wished to highlight and only in the ways he wished to address them.

First Corinthians holds a position of authority for Christians who believe it presents various norms in matters of identity, relationship, belief, and practice. This commentary proceeds in the conviction that our hearing is enhanced by our seeing. The more clearly teachers, preachers, and their congregations can see through this window into the life of that early faith community, the better we can hear the message of Scripture. To that end, this commentary attempts as clear a picture as possible of that initial church community in Corinth.

Robert Scott Nash is the Columbus Roberts Professor of New Testament in the Roberts Department of Christianity in the College of Liberal Arts of Mercer University in Macon, Georgia. Before that he was the Barney P. Averitt Professor of Religion and chair of the department of religion and philosophy at Brewton-Parker College in Mount Vernon, Georgia. He has also been the managing editor for Mercer University Press and the senior vice president, book division, for Smyth & Helwys Publishing. He is currently the senior editor for the journal Perspectives in Religious Studies and the project editor for the Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary series. He is the author of The Church as a Pilgrim People and the editor for books on Galatians, Ephesians, and the Sermon on the Mount.

2 Corinthians

  • Author: Mitzi L. Minor
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 280

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Mitzi L. Minor’s commentary on Second Corinthians takes the reader deep into the thought world of Paul and his congregation at Corinth. She explores the social and theological tensions that shape Paul’s relationship with the Corinthian Christians. His letter expresses Paul’s joy that prior severe correspondence had been positively received and problems were identified. Paul addresses issues that were tearing the church apart. False teachers were sowing discord and maligning Paul’s character. Paul found that many Corinthian Christians repented of their rebellion, and he encouraged them even as he sought to assert his role as Apostle.

Minor encourages the reader to imagine the radically new, at the time of Paul’s writing, church in Corinth. This was not a body of like-minded and similarly stationed citizens, but a novel collection of diverse people with disparate interests, struggling together to live as Christians in a world confronted by the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Mitzi L. Minor, a native Alabamian, graduated from Auburn University and attended Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, where she completed her MDiv and PhD in New Testament. After several years in parish ministry, she became chaplain and professor of religion at Bethel College in McKenzie, Tennessee. She was ordained by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in October 1991 and in 1993 joined the faculty of the Memphis Theological Seminary, where she is professor of New Testament. Her vocational focus has been the intersection of Holy Scripture with our lives of faith. She’s written articles on feminist interpretation and women’s spirituality, and two books on Mark’s gospel that reflect this interest (The Spirituality of Mark: Responding to God and The Power of Mark’s Story).

Galatians

  • Authors: Marion L. Soards and Darrell J. Pursiful
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 384

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Paul’s preaching of the gospel centered on making Christians with radically Christ-centered character. The importance and place of the Law of Moses for both Jews and Gentiles in the church was a hotly contested issue in the first century. This commentary explores this important early controversy and draws out points for application.

In his letter to the church in Galatia, Paul urged Gentile converts in churches he had founded to refrain from embracing a version of the gospel that insisted on their taking on a Jewish character in regards to the Law. He saw that this posture reduced the crucified Jesus Christ, who alone is the heart of the gospel, to being a mere agent of the Law. Paul wrote that the gospel of Jesus Christ and him crucified excludes the claim that Law-observance was somehow necessary for believers in Christ to experience the power of God’s grace.

Marion L. Soards is professor of New Testament studies at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary. He earned a PhD from Union Theological Seminary in New York City, where earlier he received an MPhil and an STM. He also has an MDiv from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and a BA from Furman University.

Darrell J. Pursiful earned both a PhD and MDiv from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is senior editor of adult curriculum at Smyth & Helwys Publishing as well as an adjunct professor in the Roberts Department of Christianity at Mercer University. He has also served as a pastor of churches in Kentucky and Indiana.

Ephesians

  • Author: Thomas B. Slater
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 224

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Thomas B. Slater’s commentary on Ephesians transports the modern reader into the world of the early church. Slater asserts that Ephesians was written to persuade its original audience that an ethnically inclusive church based on religious affiliation and faithfulness was part of God’s plan. Both Jew and Gentile are equal partners in the new religious commonwealth. Slater addresses two important questions: What does it mean to live in a racially inclusive community? and What are Paul’s ethical requirements for living in such a diverse setting?

This commentary argues that Ephesians is deutero-Pauline, reinterpreting the Apostle for a new generation of Christians. Following Christ’s model, the letter to the Ephesians teaches virtues and relationships that ensure harmony and peace within the Christian church.

Thomas B. Slater is professor of New Testament Language & Literature in Mercer University’s James & Carolyn McAfee School of Theology. Slater has published in leading scholarly journals around the globe, including Journal of Biblical Literature, New Testament Studies, and Biblica. Before coming to Mercer, he held a dual appointment at the University of Georgia in the Institute of African American Studies and the Department of Religion. A recipient of both an Overseas Research Scheme Award to pursue doctoral studies in the United Kingdom and a research grant from the Society of Biblical Literature to work on the Son of Man question, Slater has degrees from Perkins School of Theology, SMU (MTh, DMin) and King’s College London, the University of London (PhD). Slater is also an elder in full connection in the Georgia North Region of the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church.

Philippians & Philemon

  • Author: Todd D. Still
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 256

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In this commentary on Philippians and Philemon, Pauline specialist Todd D. Still presents engaging teaching on the deeply loved Letter to the Philippian church and the frequently overlooked Letter to Philemon. With clarity and care, Still explains the contents of these letters along lexical and socio-historical lines. He remains attentive to the rhetorical features, theological dimensions, and the pastoral possibilities of these texts. Dr. Still seeks interpret Paul’s thoughts and to capture the Apostle’s affections for a beloved congregation and for a recently converted slave.

Todd D. Still is associate professor of Christian Scriptures (New Testament) at the George W. Truett Theological Seminary of Baylor University. He earned his BA from Baylor University, MDiv from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, and PhD from the University of Glasgow. Still is the author of Conflict at Thessalonica and of Colossians in The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Revised Edition, the editor of Jesus and Paul Reconnected, and a coeditor of Image and Word and After the First Urban Christians. Still is also a licensed and ordained Baptist minister who frequently preaches, teaches, and serves as interim pastor in Baptist churches.

Colossians

  • Author: Nijay K. Gupta
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 250

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In Paul’s Letter to the Colossians, the reader is introduced to Christ as supreme Creator, the One who created earth and vanquished the power of death. However, this same Christ chose to bear the shame of death on a Roman cross in order to bring restoration and reconciliation to humans. This commentary presents fresh perspectives on the centrality of Jesus for the church. The enduring message of Colossians is uniquely challenging. The author testifies to the church’s cruciform life in obedience to their crucified cosmic Lord, Jesus Christ.

Nijay K. Gupta serves as assistant professor of New Testament at Northeastern Seminary in New York. He is the author of Worship That Makes Sense to Paul (Walter de Gruyter, 2010), Prepare, Succeed, Advance: A Guidebook for Getting a PhD in Biblical Studies and Beyond (Wipf & Stock, 2011), and he has published academic articles in periodicals such as The Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Journal for the Study of the New Testament, Horizons in Biblical Theology, Currents in Biblical Research, and Neotestamentica. He serves as coeditor of the Journal for the Study of Paul and His Letters (Eisenbrauns).

1 & 2 Thessalonians

  • Author: Linda McKinnish Bridges
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 320

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Explore the first-century Mediterranean world with this commentary on the Apostle Paul’s letters to the church in Thessaloniki. These letters consist of complex dialogues between the Thessalonian believers, Paul the missionary, and among subsequent Christians throughout church history.

Known as the Thessalonian correspondence, these writings give readers a wide window into the ancient environment where Paul lived, worked, and taught. In this commentary, readers learn of fears, joys, or trauma addressed by Paul’s letters.

With this commentary, find answers to common questions about social and cultural experiences of this community of new believers. Learn how they understood the life of faith. Better understand how they managed issues of life and work, faith and profession.

These letters also help twenty-first-century readers understand Paul’s perspectives on leadership, ethics, community life, and death. These letters remain impactful, just as they encouraged and challenged the community in Thessaloniki. They guide believers to live faithfully and lovingly with one another as we go about our work and worship.

Linda McKinnish Bridges (PhD, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is associate director for admissions and an adjunct professor of religion at Wake Forest University. She teaches in the Department of Religion of the College, The School of Divinity, and in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. As a college administrator, she also has served Wake Forest University as consultant to the provost, associate dean of the College, chair of the Department of Sociology, and director of the Women and Gender Studies Program. Linda McKinnish Bridges was a founding faculty member of the Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond from 1991-2001 and a member of the faculty of Union Theological Seminary in Virginia/Presbyterian School of Christian Education from 1988-1991.

1 & 2 Timothy–Titus

  • Author: W. Hulitt Gloer
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 384

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The letters to Timothy and Titus have long been grouped together as the Pastoral Epistles. These are addressed to individuals charged with the oversight of certain churches and share common subject matter.

These letters provide source material about Paul’s life and ministry and the early history of Christianity in general. This commentary provides expert analysis of the contents and assists modern readers in understanding and applying Paul’s timeless instruction.

Hulitt Gloer has written a very helpful and informative commentary on the Pastoral Epistles that addresses the major issues at stake in these often controversial letters, and he interprets them with their original readers in mind. He recognizes the many difficult critical issues involved in their study, but more importantly he takes these three letters seriously as canonical Scripture and reads them in this light. Through the volume there are cogent sidebars with useful information, and the Connections sections help the reader—whether lay person or pastor—to recognize important practical insights.

—Stanley E. Porter, president and professor of New Testament, McMaster Divinity College, Hamilton, ON, Canada

W. Hulitt Gloer is David E. Garland Professor of Preaching and Scriptures and Director of the Kyle Lake Center for Effective Preaching at Baylor University’s George W. Truett Theological Seminary. He is the author of As You Go: An Honest Look at Jesus’ First Disciples and Reading Paul’s Letters to Individuals: A Literary and Theological Commentary on Paul’s Letters to Philemon, Titus, and Timothy (with Perry L. Stepp).

Hebrews–James

  • Authors: Edgar V. McKnight and Christopher Church
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 580

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In his commentary on the Letter to the Hebrews, New Testament scholar Edgar McKnight explores two aspects of Hebrews as covenant—an appeal to the perfection and finality of Jesus Christ and an exhortation to faith based on that appeal. He also highlights the occasionally counterintuitive interpretative strategies of the author of this letter. This approach frames the author of Hebrews’ treatment of the problems of early Christians from the perspective of our modern world.

The Letter of James is a surviving representation of a once-flourishing Jewish Christianity. The Letter of James reveals a form of ancient Christianity distinctly different from the Pauline form of biblical Christianity. In this helpful examination of one of the earliest Christian communities, readers find fresh perspectives on familiar instruction. Specifically, a heavy emphasis on ethical responsibility and social justice makes this commentary a needed guide that contrasts Christian communities from an unjust world.

Edgar V. McKnight is research professor and the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Religion Emeritus at Furman University. He received degrees in History, New Testament Studies, and Philosophical Theology from the College of Charleston, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and Oxford University.

Christopher Church serves as Professor of Philosophy & Religion at the Baptist College of Health Sciences (Memphis, TN) as well as Ethics Consultant for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, where he chairs the clinical Ethics Committee. He is a graduate of the University of Georgia and the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

1 & 2 Peter, Jude

  • Authors: Richard B. Vinson, Richard F. Wilson, and Watson E. Mills
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 464

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The Smyth & Helwys Bible Commentary series is built upon the idea that meaningful Bible study can occur when the insights of contemporary biblical scholars are applied with pastoral sensitivity. Using a multimedia format, the volumes employ a stunning array of art, maps, and drawings to illustrate the insights of the Bible. This commentary is filled with expert analysis by a trio of scholars that examine and expound upon the letters of Peter and the book of Jude. Their findings are analyzed and presented in an accessible format. Together, this plurality of voices relate a unified interpretation to benefit Christians in a variety of settings.

Their findings are analyzed and presented in an accessible format. Together, this plurality of voices relate a unified interpretation to benefit Christians in a variety of settings.

Richard B. Vinson is professor of Religion at Salem College in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and affiliate professor of New Testament at Union Presbyterian Seminary at Charlotte. Vinson holds degrees from Samford University, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and Duke University, and previously taught at Averett University and Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond.

Richard F. Wilson is the Columbus Roberts Professor of Theology and the Chair of the Roberts Department of Christianity in Mercer University’s College of Liberal Arts in Macon, Georgia. Since 1995 he has been active with the Baptist World Alliance; from 2010–2015 he will be the Chair of the BWA’s Commission on Christian Ethics. Currently he is committed to developing relationships between Ricks Institute, a K–12 boarding school near Monrovia, Liberia; Mercer University; and an array of private boarding schools and churches in the Southeast.

Watson E. Mills was professor of New Testament in the Roberts Department of Christianity in the College of Liberal Arts at Mercer University from 1979 to 2001. He was also the publisher for Mercer University Press; the editor for Perspectives in Religious Studies, Religious Studies Review, and the Bulletin of the Council of Societies for the Study of Religion; and the pastor of the Sharpsburg Baptist Church in Georgia. He was the general editor for the Mercer Dictionary of the Bible and the Mercer Commentary on the Bible and has written and edited numerous other books.

1, 2 & 3 John

  • Author: Peter Rhea Jones
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 312

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How do modern Christians react when a community of faith experiences division? The letters of John provide an answer. Together, they nurture and strengthen believers while being realistic about those who are disrupting the community. John commands Christians to love one another and be hospitable, but also advises them to beware and resist trouble-makers.

The first letter of John was written during an era when the church was dividing because of disagreement about the humanity of Christ. John’s goal was to strengthen fellowship among like-minded congregations. This helpful commentary explains how John challenged claims from rival factions, tested each one, and then fully discredited their position. John’s advice on how to respond to such dangerous beliefs was to demonstrate the ideal Christian life. We are to teach followers how to recognize truthfulness and falsehood and to call people to remember what they have heard from the beginning of their faith.

Peter Jones also helpfully explores the second letter of John. He shows how John emphasized the serious nature of false teachings and encourages readers to be on their guard. His treatment of Third John compares the approach of two different leaders of a religious community. Gaius offered hospitality while a leader known as Diotrephes denied it to others.

Peter Rhea Jones is the J. Truett Gannon Professor of Preaching and New Testament at the McAfee School of Theology at Mercer University in Atlanta. He was born in Dyersburg, Tennessee, and earned a BA in English (with a minor in religion) from Union University, an MA in English literature at the University of Mississippi, an MDiv and PhD from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and a ThM from Princeton Theological Seminary.

He served on the faculty at Southern Seminary and then became pastor of the First Baptist Church of Decatur. He published The Teaching of the Parables in 1982 and later a major revision in 1999 under the title of Studying the Parables.

Revelation

  • Author: Mitchell G. Reddish
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 472

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The book of Revelation has been often misused and neglected by Christians who are unsure of how to approach this apocalyptic text. Mitchell Reddish believes that the church has an obligation to reclaim the book of Revelation and allow it to speak afresh as a powerful message of God. His commentary combines serious scholarship with contemporary application, designed to help modern readers understand and appreciate this mysterious and forward-looking writing.

Revelation is filled with visual and auditory richness. Reddish maintains that the visions, symbols, and seemingly strange images in the book are to be experienced more than explained. His interpretation asserts that the genius of Revelation is found in the cumulative effect of these imaginative components of John’s writings.

The unique features of this commentary are its three-fold format for each section of the biblical text: 1 a commentary section containing critical analysis and interpretation; 2 a section that makes connects the text and the modern reader by suggesting contemporary applications of the text; and 3 special interest material related to the text.

Mitchell G. Reddish is professor and chair of religious studies at Stetson University, DeLand, Florida. His other works include An Introduction to the Bible, An Introduction to the Gospels, and Apocalyptic Literature: A Reader.

The Lord’s Prayer

  • Author: Nijay K. Gupta
  • Publisher: Smyth & Helwys
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Pages: 200

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The Lord’s Prayer is the most recited, most memorized, and most studied text in the Bible. This prayer of Jesus, found in two versions in Matthew and Luke, has been extolled for its simplicity and beauty, for its reflection of “real life,” and for its vision of the consummated kingdom. It also contains several conundrums: what does it mean to “hallow” the Father’s name? What relationship does our forgiveness of others have with God’s forgiveness for us? If God does not tempt, why would we pray “Lead us not into temptation”? This commentary not only addresses these important questions but also offers insight into how the global church throughout generations has interacted with the Lord’s Prayer and has found in it inspiration and hope.

Nijay Gupta has written a volume about the Lord’s Prayer that offers a rare combination of solid exegesis with pastoral warmth. Gupta makes the prayer of all prayers come alive with careful exposition combined with insights from literature, history, and art. A truly judicious investigation of the theological dimensions and spiritual depth of the Lord’s prayer.

—Michael F. Bird, Ridley College, Melbourne, Australia

Nijay Gupta has crafted a lovely volume on the Lord’s Prayer. He illumines this well-known prayer with attention to its back and front stories. Readers will appreciate Gupta’s clear exposition of the prayer in its Matthean and Lukan contexts, as well as rich contributions from its reception history—in word and image. This is a gem of a commentary.

—Jeannine K. Brown, professor of New Testament, Bethel Seminary

Nijay K. Gupta serves as assistant professor of New Testament at Northeastern Seminary in New York. He is the author of Worship That Makes Sense to Paul (Walter de Gruyter, 2010), Prepare, Succeed, Advance: A Guidebook for Getting a PhD in Biblical Studies and Beyond (Wipf & Stock, 2011), and he has published academic articles in periodicals such as The Catholic Biblical Quarterly, Journal for the Study of the New Testament, Horizons in Biblical Theology, Currents in Biblical Research, and Neotestamentica. He serves as coeditor of the Journal for the Study of Paul and His Letters (Eisenbrauns).