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T&T Clark Old Testament in the New Testament Collection Upgrade (7 vols.)

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Overview

Dig deep into how the New Testament uses the Old with these works from the Library of New Testament Studies (LNTS). This series offers cutting-edge work for a readership of scholars, teachers, and students. All the diverse aspects of New Testament study are represented—including innovative work from historical perspectives, studies using social-scientific and literary theory, and developing theological, cultural, and contextual approaches.

More than mere overview, these specific examinations help instill a deep understanding of larger themes, including how themes and texts from Isaiah and the psalms are used in the New Testament, hermeneutics, and the presence of creation theology in John's Gospel.

For more from this series, see the Library of New Testament Studies.

Key Features

  • Examines specific issues in the New Testament’s use of the Old Testament
  • Explores historical, social-scientific, literary, theological, and contextual perspectives
  • Gathers important research from several influential New Testament scholars

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In the Logos editions, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Searching the Scriptures: Studies in Context and Intertextuality

  • Editors: Craig A. Evans and Jeremiah J. Johnston
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This work critically engages the hermeneutical methods used to analyse the New Testament writings, so that the lenses through which studies of the texts have been traditionally viewed can be revised. Jeremy Hultin contributes an article on the rhetorical use of the chosen citations by Jewish rabbis in their commentary on scripture, while Mark Gignilliat writes on the potential implications for viewing Old Testament Scripture in the manner of the early Church exegetes and theologians. With these two contributions providing a frame for the other chapters, the essays explore a range of topics, including the significance of the number 42 in Matthew, the study of Wisdom in Matthew, Hebrew material in the New Testament, and the uses of Scripture in the letters of Paul and the letters to the Hebrews.

Read separately, these articles provide fascinating insights and revisions to established ideas on intertextuality between the Old/Hebrew Bible and the New Testament writings. Taken together, the collection presents a solid argument for the fundamental revision of our current hermeneutical practice in Biblical Studies.

Craig A. Evans (PhD, Claremont) is Payzant distinguished professor of New Testament, Acadia Divinity College Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Jeremiah J. Johnston is associate professor of Early Christianity at Houston Baptist University, USA.

Psalm 110 and the Logic of Hebrews

  • Author: Jared Compton
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

A neglected area of study of the letter to the Hebrews is the function of the Old Testament in the letter's logic. Compton addresses this neglect by looking at two other ideas that have themselves received too little attention, namely (1) the unique and fundamental semantic contribution of Hebrews' exposition (vis-à-vis its exhortation) and (2) the prominence of Ps 110 in the author's exposition. The conclusion becomes clear that Hebrews' exposition-its theological argument-turns, in large part, on successive inferences drawn from Ps 110:1 and 4.

Compton observes that the author uses the text in the first part of his exposition to (1) interpret Jesus' resurrection as his messianic enthronement, (2) connect Jesus' enthronement with his fulfillment of Ps 8's vision for humanity and, thus, (3) begin to explain why Jesus was enthroned through suffering. In the second and third parts of his exposition, the author uses the text to corroborate the narrative initially sketched. Thus, he uses the text to (1) show that messiah was expected to be a superior priest and, moreover, (2) show that this messianic priest was expected to solve the human problem through death.

Jared Compton is a pastor at CrossWay Community Church in Bristol, Wisconsin, USA.

Creation Imagery in the Gospel of John

  • Author: Carlos Raul Sosa Siliezar
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 272

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Sosa Siliezar investigates the presence and significance of creation imagery in the Gospel of John. He argues that John has intentionally included only a limited (albeit significant) number of instances of creation imagery and that he has positioned them carefully to highlight their significance.

Sosa Siliezar contends that the instances of creation imagery used in varying contexts function collectively in a threefold way that is consonant with John's overall argument. First, John uses them to portray Jesus in close relationship with his Father, existing apart from and prior to the created order. Second, John uses creation imagery to assert the primal and universal significance of Jesus and the message about him, and to privilege him over other important figures in the story of Israel. Third, John uses creation imagery to link past reality with present and future reality, portraying Jesus as the agent of creation whom the reader should regard as the primal agent of revelation and salvation. The book concludes by underscoring how these findings inform our understanding of John's Christology and Johannine dualism.

Carlos Raul Sosa Siliezar is a lecturer at several universities in Guatemala City, Guatemala.

Written to Serve: The Use of Scripture in 1 Peter

  • Author: Benjamin Sargent
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The use of Scripture in 1 Peter has been subject to much extensive analysis in the last 30 years. In Written to Serve Benjamin Sargent offers an up-to-date and comprehensive analysis of how 1 Pet 1.10-12 offers a 'hermeneutic,' providing an insight into how Scripture is interpreted in the letter. Sargent also argues that the relation of 1.10-12 has been misunderstood. Rather than offering a Christological hermeneutic with a focus on the suffering and glories of Christ, Sargent asserts that the primary importance of 1.10-12 is its orientation of the prophetic witness towards the eschatological community as an act of service. Similarly, rather than offering a theological narrative of continuity between Israel and Christian communities, 1.10-12 may be seen to suggest a narrative of profound discontinuity in which the community in the present is elevated above God's people of the past.

Benjamin Sargent is research fellow at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford, United Kingdom.

The Followers of Jesus as the ‘Servant’: Luke’s Model from Isaiah for the Disciples in Luke-Acts

  • Author: Holly Beers
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 208

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Luke models his portrayal both of Jesus and his disciples in Luke-Acts after the human agent of the Isaianic New Exodus in Isaiah 40-66. In the Isaianic New Exodus, the servant is integral to the restoration—the servant's mission being embodied is, to a great extent, how the New Exodus comes to fruition.

The servant connection is at times explicit, as Jesus is identified with the servant in Luke 4:18-19 (quoting Isa 61:1-2 [with 58:6]), Luke 22:37 (citing Isa 53:12), and Acts 8:32-33 (Isa 53:7-8). Regarding the disciples, Isaiah 49:6 is quoted by Paul in Acts 13:47 in reference to himself and Barnabas, though a focus only on quotations is too limiting. Allusions to servant passages abound. This work argues that Luke sees Jesus fulfilling the servant role in an ultimate sense, but that his followers, modelled after him in Acts, also embody it. This can be seen in Luke's use of Isaianic servant imagery, including suffering, lack of violent response (to unjust treatment), and language in the disciples' characterization.

Holly Beers is instructor of religious studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California.

Paul, Scribe of Old and New: Intertextual Insights for the Jesus-Paul Debate

  • Author: Yongbom Lee
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 208

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this study, Yongbom Lee re-examines the old Jesus-Paul debate with insights from current studies on intertextuality in Paul. Lee identifies Paul's typical ways of handling authoritative traditions in a number of cases providing a set of expectations as to how his use of them elsewhere might look.

Lee begins by investigating the use of the Scriptures in the Rule of the Community and the Damascus Document. He then examines five cases of Paul's use of the Scriptures and contemporary Jewish exegetical traditions and three cases of his use of the Jesus tradition. Despite the skepticism concerning Paul's knowledge and appreciation of the Jesus tradition, the fact that his use of the Jesus tradition is similar to that of the Scriptures and contemporary Jewish exegetical traditions-with respect to its presumption of authority, various citation methods, and its creative application to the situation of his readers-provides the evidence for its importance to him.

Yongbom Lee is the English Ministry pastor at Los Angeles Antioch Presbyterian Church, and is an adjunct professor at Fuller Theological Seminary. He also teaches at Central Baptist Theological Seminary, Azusa Pacific University, and Bethesda University of California.

Swimming in the Sea of Scripture: Paul’s Use of the Old Testament in 2 Corinthians 4:7–13:13

  • Author: Paul Han
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 224

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In examining the appropriation of Scripture in 2 Corinthians 4–13, Han argues that the apostle is not only aware of the original contexts of the passages he refers to, but also goes beyond the immediate contexts and brings in the larger context of the Old Testament.

In the course of adapting the Scripture, necessary changes of referent occur and Paul appears to use the method of identification in reading the Old Testament. Whether it is Paul himself, the Corinthians, or the opponents, various kinds of identification take place with the scriptural writers and the characters mentioned in it. This identification extends even to the point of identifying the Corinthians with the Servant of Isaiah, Jesus, and God. From this it is suggested that there is a concept of 'corporate identity' present throughout the chapters, which is also seen in the Old Testament.

In many cases, Paul's basic thrust is sufficiently clear even without any understanding of scriptural references he makes. This is because Paul often makes a rhetorical use of the Scripture by citing a text at climactic points or near the closing of a section he is developing to strengthen his points, even as he brings in the 'big picture' of the Old Testament.

Paul Han completed his doctorate at London School of Theology, UK, and is currently involved in ministry at Myungsung Church, Seoul, South Korea.

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