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Overview

The Book of Job is lauded as not only a stunning theological and spiritual achievement, but a masterpiece of poetic literature. The celebrated poet and novelist Victor Hugo said, “Tomorrow, if all literature was to be destroyed and it was left to me to retain one work only, I should save Job.”

This collection features some of the best commentaries, studies, sermons, and lectures on Job from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It includes over 4,500 pages of interpretation, outlines, historical context, and practical application—perfect for your sermon preparation, personal Bible study, or academic work.

When translating the book of Job, Martin Luther quipped, “Job is suffering more from my version than from the taunts of his friends!” Countless biblical scholars have labored to capture the vivid metaphors and sophisticated poetry of the original Hebrew. This collection includes original translations, some of which are set to rhyme and meter. The many versions and copious textual notes provide the tools you need to get a better sense of any passage’s meaning. Plus, this collection includes authors utilizing a variety of methods from across the theological spectrum, making your study thorough and well-rounded.

In the Logos editions, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Complete your study of Job with the Classic Commentaries and Studies on Job.

Key Features

  • Includes commentaries, studies, sermons, and lectures on the book of Job
  • Features metrical and rhyming versions of the book of Job
  • Provides a variety of theological and methodological approaches to Job

Product Details

  • Title: Classic Commentaries and Studies on Job Upgrade
  • Volumes: 17
  • Pages: 4,584
  • Christian Group: Evangelical
  • Resource Type: Commentaries
  • Topic: Job

Individual Titles

The Epic of the Inner Life: Being the Book of Job

  • Author: John F. Genung
  • Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin and Company
  • Publication Date: 1892
  • Pages: 352

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In his literary translation of what he calls the “epic poem” of Job, John F. Genung captures the elegiac beauty and soaring themes often missing in translations made by committees. As he says in his introduction, “The Revised Version . . . is the somewhat colorless . . . product of many minds.” By translating Job afresh, Genung reinvigorates the ancient words which, he argues, were originally the magnum opus of a single genius, not a panel of experts. His accompanying analysis applies the full brunt of literary criticism, arguing that even this sacred book should not be spared the scrutiny applied to other works of art. The poem emerges from his treatment appearing even more sacred—a theological analysis of the human condition at once both majestic and earthy.

John F. Genung (1850–1919) was a Baptist minister before becoming professor of rhetoric at Amherst College in 1882. A respected literary critic, he was the author of Tennyson’s “In Memoriam”: Its Purposes and Its Structure as well as numerous books on rhetoric, including Practical Elements of Rhetoric, Handbook of Rhetoric Analysis, and The Working Principles of Rhetoric. His interests in literature and the Bible converged in his unique study, Ecclesiastes and Omar Khayyám.

The Problem of Pain: A Study in the Book of Job

  • Author: John Edgar McFadyen
  • Publisher: James Clarke & Co.
  • Pages: 290

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

As the world reeled from the convulsions of World War I, the themes of the book of Job seemed more relevant than ever. As John E. McFadyen says in the introduction to his translation and commentary, “There is nothing here about the War. Yet it is perhaps not too much to hope that this noble ancient discussion will shed some light on the sorrows which have perplexed the faith of some and broken the hearts of many.”

John Edgar McFadyen (1870–1933) was a Scottish theologian, linguist, and professor of literature and theology at the University of Glasgow. He also translated several Old Testament books into “modern speech” and was a proponent of the international auxiliary language, Esperanto. He is the author of A Cry for Justice: A Study in Amos, The Book of the Prophecies of Isaiah, and The Message of the Prophetic and Priestly Historians.

The Book of Job

  • Author: E.W. Bullinger
  • Publisher: Eyre & Spottiswoode
  • Publication Date: 1903
  • Pages: 232

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

It’s notoriously difficult for translators to capture the cadence of Hebrew poetry in English. In his version of Job, E.W. Bullinger rendered the poem in ten-syllable lines, hoping to convey the stately rhythm and weighty language of the original. His metrical take is accompanied by a commentary that relates Job’s plight to “the oldest lesson in the world”—how man can be just with God. Bullinger’s single-minded focus brings clarity to a book that is often clouded by theological obscurity.

E.W. Bullinger (1837–1913) was an Anglican clergyman and Biblical scholar. Often credited as the originator of the ultradispensationalist position, he argued that the New Testament church did not begin until after the events depicted in the book of Acts. Bullinger is the author of A Critical Lexicon and Concordance to the English and Greek New Testament, The Companion Bible, and Figures of Speech Used in the Bible: Explained and Illustrated.

Eleven Lectures on the Book of Job

  • Author: William Kelly
  • Publisher: F.E. Race
  • Publication Date: 1919
  • Pages: 289

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this series of lectures delivered shortly before his death in 1906, beloved preacher and biblical scholar William Kelly works systematically through the entire book of Job. Rendered in an off-the-cuff style, these talks draw spiritual lessons and practical application from a book rife with the tensions of God’s goodness and human suffering in a seemingly unjust world.

William Kelly (1823–1906) was born in Ireland and moved to London after attending Trinity College in Dublin. A prolific and beloved writer and lecturer, he earned the respect of prominent preacher Charles Spurgeon, who praised his scholarship but lamented his commitment to the unique theology of the Plymouth Brethren. Kelly is the author of Lectures Introductory to the Study of the Epistles of Paul the Apostle, The Second Epistle of Peter, and Psalms, A New Version with Short Notes.

The Book of Job

  • Author: John Mason Good
  • Publisher: Black, Parry, and Co.
  • Publication Date: 1812
  • Pages: 706

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

According to John Mason Good, not only is the book of Job a profound exploration of the goodness of God in the suffering of man, it also provides a unique window into the religion of the Patriarchal period. Good argues that the book is the oldest in the Bible, and depicts events that likely occurred during the time of Abraham. His translation and commentary gleans historical insights into this ancient era, as well as profound spiritual lessons from Job’s plight.

John Mason Good (1764–1827) was a practicing surgeon as well as a writer and theologian. Fluent in Hebrew, Persian, and Arabic, he wrote extensively on medical, classical, and theological matters. He is the author of An Historical Outline of the Book of Psalms and Song of Songs, or, Sacred Idyls.

A Commentary, Grammatical and Exegetical, on the Book of Job

  • Author: A.B. Davidson
  • Publisher: Williams and Norgate
  • Publication Date: 1862
  • Pages: 202

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In his commentary on the book of Job, esteemed Old Testament scholar A.B. Davidson avoids rehashing the insights of other commentators, preferring to base his study on the grammar of the original and limiting his references to only the most prominent scholars of his time. He reconstructs the meaning of Job as a whole, arguing that the events portrayed are designed to answer the question “Does Job serve God for naught?”

A.B. Davidson was professor of Hebrew and Old Testament exegesis at New College in Edinburgh, Scotland. He is the author of The Theology of the Old Testament, Hebrew Syntax, and The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges: Ezekiel.

The Book of Job: With Introduction and Notes

  • Author: Edgar C.S. Gibson
  • Publisher: Methuen & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1905
  • Pages: 236

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this commentary, Anglican priest and scholar Edgar C.S. Gibson overviews late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century critical scholarship on the book of Job and comments on the significance of the book for doctrine, the church, and personal piety.

Edgar C.S. Gibson (1848–1924) was the 31st Bishop of Gloucester. He was educated at Charterhouse and Trinity College, Oxford, and ordained in 1872. He served as chaplain and later vice principal at Wells Theological College, before becoming principal of Leeds Clergy School and then rural dean and vicar of Leeds Parish Church. In 1901, he was appointed honorary chaplain to Queen Victoria. He is the author of Self-Discipline, The Old Testament in the New, and Northumbrian Saints.

The Gospel Revealed to Job: Or, Patriarchal Faith and Practice Illustrated

  • Author: Charles Augustus Hulbert
  • Publisher: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans
  • Publication Date: 1853
  • Pages: 511

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Although it is perhaps the oldest in the Bible, Charles Augustus Hulbert argues that the book of Job rings with the mercy and grace of the gospel. Quoting James 5:11, he says that its purpose is to show “that the Lord is very pitiful, and of tender mercy.” His thorough commentary demonstrates how this singular theme is woven throughout the book.

Charles Augustus Hulbert (1804–1888) was an Anglican clergyman and theologian. He is the author of Theotokos, or the Song of the Virgin and Poetical Recreations.

A New Version of the Book of Job; with Notes, vol. 1

  • Author: Friedrich Wilhelm Umbreit
  • Translator: John Hamilton Gray
  • Publisher: Thomas Clark
  • Publication Date: 1836
  • Pages: 329

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Friedrich Wilhelm Umbreit’s translation of Job comes with copious notes based on the original language. In his introduction, Umbreit describes the book as a struggle with the seemingly unjust suffering of good people, while the unrighteous live in frivolity, prosperity, and freedom. Job—whom Umbreit characterizes as an ancient sage—only comes to terms with this disparity when he places his faith in God and accepts the inscrutability of divine wisdom.

Friedrich Wilhelm Umbreit (1795–1860) was a German Protestant theologian and a Hebrew Bible scholar. A professor of Old Testament studies and Oriental philology at the University of Heidelberg, he wrote commentaries on the books of Proverbs and Job, as well as a four-volume opus on the Prophets, Praktischer Commentar über die Propheten des alten Bundes.

John Hamilton Gray was a translator of German theological works into English.

A New Version of the Book of Job; with Notes, vol. 2

  • Authors: Friedrich Wilhelm Umbreit and John Hamilton Gray
  • Publisher: Thomas Clark
  • Translator: John Hamilton Gray
  • Publication Date: 1837
  • Pages: 335

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Friedrich Wilhelm Umbreit’s translation of Job comes with copious notes based on the original language. In his introduction, Umbreit describes the book as a struggle with the seemingly unjust suffering of good people, while the unrighteous live in frivolity, prosperity, and freedom. Job—whom Umbreit characterizes as an ancient sage—only comes to terms with this disparity when he places his faith in God and accepts the inscrutability of divine wisdom.

Friedrich Wilhelm Umbreit (1795–1860) was a German Protestant theologian and a Hebrew Bible scholar. A professor of Old Testament studies and Oriental philology at the University of Heidelberg, he wrote commentaries on the books of Proverbs and Job, as well as a four-volume opus on the Prophets, Praktischer Commentar über die Propheten des alten Bundes.

John Hamilton Gray was a translator of German theological works into English.

The Book of Job

  • Author: Samuel Ridout
  • Publisher: Loizeaux Brothers
  • Publication Date: 1919
  • Pages: 264

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Christians find great spiritual refreshment in the pages of the New Testament, but Samuel Ridout says the same rejuvenating streams flow from the book of Job—we just have to know how to find them. In this commentary, he maps out the tributaries of grace that course through the book, guiding Christians to discover how Job’s thirst for justice was only quenched by the mercy of God.

Samuel Ridout (1855–1927) was a biblical commentator and preacher. A graduate of Princeton Seminary, he left the Presbyterian church to join the Plymouth Brethren movement. He is the author of The Bible: The True University, How to Study the Bible, and King Saul: The Man After the Flesh.

The Book of Job Translated and Annotated

  • Author: F.H. Wilkinson
  • Publisher: Skeffington & Son
  • Publication Date: 1901
  • Pages: 132

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

F.H. Wilkinson’s translation lays out the story of Job as a play, complete with scene numbering and headings labeling the speaker in each section. Wilkinson’s notes focus on the translational issues and briefly summarize the meanings of unusual idioms.

F.H. Wilkinson was a pastor, biblical scholar, and fellow at Madras University in India. He is the author of Parting Words to a Little Flock.

The Book of Job

  • Author: William Johnston Zuck
  • Publisher: United Bretheren Publishing House
  • Publication Date: 1898
  • Pages: 214

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

William Johnston Zuck opted for a more literal translation of Job than did his friend and colleague John F. Genung in The Epic of the Inner Life. In The Book of Job, with an Introduction and Notes, Zuck references Genung’s translation and others to help readers understand the poem’s meaning in the original language. His accompanying introduction argues that “the book explains to us the uses of affliction and trial, but its sublimest lesson is to lift us above the need of an explanation.”

William Johnston Zuck was a United Brethren scholar. He is the author of Christ Our Devotional Example.

The Book of Job

  • Author: James Aitken
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1905
  • Pages: 114

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this guide to the book of Job designed especially for Bible classes and personal study, James Aitken argues that although the author of Job likely based his story on the collective memory of a great Patriarch, this literary masterpiece bears all the marks of “poetic idealization.” Aitken argues that God’s response to Job in the whirlwind summarizes the argument of the whole book: the proper response to suffering is to stop brooding, to contemplate the vastness of the universe, and to thus be awed by God’s majesty and care.

James Aitken (1808–1890) was a church historian and Presbyterian minister. He is the author of The History of Protestantism and The Papacy: Its History, Dogmas, Genius, and Prospects.

From behind the Veil: Life Studies from the Book of Job

  • Author: H.E. Stone
  • Publisher: E. Marlborough & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1903
  • Pages: 204

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this practical study first delivered as a series of sermons, H.E. Stone relates Job’s plight to readers’ everyday struggles—and to Jesus’ provision for sin on the cross. His reverent analysis urges readers to realize with Job that although God’s mysterious providence often leads to suffering, he is tender and merciful to those who rely on him.

H.E. Stone was a biblical scholar and author of David, the Man after God’s Own Heart, Strangely Led, Led from Darkness, and Twisted Threads.

The Book of Job: A Metrical Version

  • Author: A.H. Mumford
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton
  • Publication Date: 1922
  • Pages: 174

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this version of Job based on the King James Version, A.H. Mumford restores the poetry of the original by setting the words to rhyme and meter. To prevent distraction, the text is unencumbered by verse numbering and textual notes. An introduction and appendixes provide background and translational notes for those who wish to deepen their study.

A.H. Mumford was dean of the faculty of theology at Manchester College. He is the author of Our Church’s Story: Being a History of the Moravian Church for Young People.

The Century Bible: Job

  • Author: A.S. Peake
  • Publisher: T.C. & E.C. Jack
  • Publication Date: 1909

One of the earliest commentary series to combine extensive explanatory notes with the biblical text for personal Bible study, The Century Bible is similar to a modern study Bible. In this commentary on Job, A.S. Peake discusses the authorship, genre, and relationship of the book to the rest of the canon. His commentary draws on the Revised Standard Version and includes extensive historical background and exegetical detail as well as practical application.

A.S. Peake (1865–1929) was a professor of biblical exegesis at the University of Manchester. He is the author of Peake’s Commentary on the Bible and The Problem of Suffering in the Old Testament.