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Works of the Early English Reformers (37 vols.)
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Overview

Some dismiss the English Reformation as wholly motivated by a monarch’s marital affairs. But this vision fails to account for the strong theological undercurrent that sustained the movement before, during, and long after Henry VIII’s death. Theologians writing in these fierce times left behind writings of fiery expression, reflecting the harsh situations many faced. Exile, imprisonment, and death lay at the end of a conviction for heresy—the bounds of which changed with each new king or queen.

Three hundred years later, low church evangelicals and high church Anglo-Catholics dueled to define the place of early English Protestant thought in nineteenth-century Anglican theology. The evangelical Parker Society devoted itself to demonstrating how evangelical and Reformed theology shaped the early Church of England. Responding to the Oxford Movement’s Tracts for the Times, the Parker Society published the volumes in this collection. These resources gather the writings of early English Reformers, forming “a combined testimony to the power and value of the blessed Reformation.”

Among these writings are the works of Thomas Cranmer, whose thought was a predominant force in composing the 39 Articles, the Book of Common Prayer, and the Book of Homilies. John Hooper’s earnest writings reflect his uncompromising work and commitment to Reformed theology that ultimately led him to be burnt at the stake under Mary I. William Fulke’s spirited defense of the Bible in the people’s tongue and the manipulations of the Catholic Church reveal the virulent edges of the Puritan movement. These and other works from, John Jewel, Thomas Cooper, John Philpot, James Pilkington, and many more make this collection a trove of resources on “the spirit and principles of the Reformation in their various forms of development.”

In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Delve deeper into the conflicts that drove the English Reformation with Original Letters Relative to the English Reformation.

Key Features

  • Gathers the work of the most significant figures of the English Reformation
  • Includes treatises, letters, catechisms, devotions, liturgies, poetry, and more
  • Provides insight into the theological underpinnings of the English Reformation

Product Details

Individual Titles

The Early Works of Thomas Becon: Being the Treatises Published by Him in the Reign of King Henry VIII

  • Author: Thomas Becon
  • Editor: John Ayre
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1843
  • Pages: 500

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Though little is known of Thomas Becon’s personal life, he was held in high esteem by his peers, and he was made Thomas Cranmer’s household chaplain. The Parker Society’s collection of his early writings, written during Henry VIII’s tumultuous reign, reflect a milder Becon. John Ayre provides a biographical sketch of Becon, and compiles 10 treatises from the Reformer.

Thomas Becon (1511–1567) was an English Protestant Reformer, and close ally of Thomas Cranmer. He was arrested for his Protestant teaching in 1540, but restored to the Church of England as chaplain to Edward Seymour after Henry VIII’s death. Thomas Cranmer made him one of the Six Preachers of Canterbury. He was exiled under the reign of Mary, fleeing to Frankfurt. He returned to England upon Elizabeth’s succession as canon of the Canterbury Cathedral.

The Catechism of Thomas Becon, with Other Pieces Written by Him in the Reign of King Edward the Sixth

  • Author: Thomas Becon
  • Editor: John Ayre
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1844
  • Pages: 670

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Thomas Becon, an influential English theologian who was Thomas Cranmer’s own household chaplain, composed this catechism after his release from prison after the death of Henry VIII. This volume, compiled by the Parker Society, demonstrates the evangelical undercurrents of the English Reformation. It also includes other of Becon’s works from Edward VI’s reign, including The Jewel of Joy, The Castle of Comfort, and The Solace of the Soul.

Thomas Becon (1511–1567) was an English Protestant Reformer, and close ally of Thomas Cranmer. He was arrested for his Protestant teaching in 1540, but restored to the Church of England as chaplain to Edward Seymour after Henry VIII’s death. Thomas Cranmer made him one of the Six Preachers of Canterbury. He was exiled under the reign of Mary, fleeing to Frankfurt. He returned to England upon Elizabeth’s succession as canon of the Canterbury Cathedral.

Prayers and Other Pieces of Thomas Becon

  • Author: Thomas Becon
  • Editor: John Ayre
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1844
  • Pages: 644

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume of prayers and poetry from Thomas Becon, a household chaplain of Thomas Cranmer and influential preacher, features the preacher’s later, more radical works. Compiled by the evangelical Parker Society, this volume delves into early Anglican thought on communion, the authority of Scripture, and the work of Christ, especially as opposed to Catholic theology.

Thomas Becon (1511–1567) was an English Protestant Reformer, and close ally of Thomas Cranmer. He was arrested for his Protestant teaching in 1540, but restored to the Church of England as chaplain to Edward Seymour after Henry VIII’s death. Thomas Cranmer made him one of the Six Preachers of Canterbury. He was exiled under the reign of Mary, fleeing to Frankfurt. He returned to England upon Elizabeth’s succession as canon of the Canterbury Cathedral.

An Answer to John Martiall’s Treatise of the Cross

  • Author: James Calfhill
  • Editor: Richard Gibbings
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1846
  • Pages: 418

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

James Calfhill’s major work, this volume responds to John Martiall’s defense of the crucifix—dedicated to Elizabeth I and her keeping of a crucifix. Calfhill decries the use of images of Christ in worship. His passionate treatise draws on the writings of the Church Fathers and reflects the strong Reformed currents that ran through the English Reformation.

James Calfhill (1530–1570) was dean of Bocking, archdeacon of Colchester, and bishop-elect of Worcester. A staunch Calvinist, Calfhill frequently decried the “papistical yoke” laid on the Church of England, and defended the doctrines of the Reformation.

An Answer in Defence of the Truth against the Apology of Private Mass

  • Author: Thomas Cooper
  • Editor: William Goode
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1850
  • Pages: 224

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Thomas Cooper was a stout defender of the Church of England as distinct from the Catholic Church. This volume, in which Cooper answers a Catholic defense of private mass directed against John Jewel, is characteristic of Cooper’s distaste for Rome. Compiled by the evangelical Parker Society, this volume also includes the original apology Cooper answers.

Thomas Cooper (1517–1594) was bishop of Lincoln and later bishop of Winchester. Cooper’s influential Thesaurus Linguae Romanae et Britannicae is believed to have been used by Shakespeare in the composition of many of his plays and poems.

The Works of Thomas Cranmer, vol. 1: Writings and Disputations of Thomas Cranmer Relative to the Sacrament of the Lord’s Supper

  • Author: Thomas Cranmer
  • Editor: John Edmund Cox
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1844
  • Pages: 588

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Thomas Cranmer was perhaps the most important theological figure in the reformation of the English Church. His theological fingerprints are found everywhere in the 39 Articles and the Book of Common Prayer. This collection of his works, compiled by the evangelical Parker Society, compiles Cranmer’s contentious writings on the Lord’s Supper—a point of particular conflict between Rome and England. It is representative of the theological undercurrents that drove the English Reformation forward.

Thomas Cranmer (1489–1556) was the archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. During his time as archbishop, Cranmer, along with Thomas Cromwell, championed the translation of the Bible into English. In 1548, plans for a complete liturgy for the English Church began. Cranmer compiled the Book of Common Prayer, which was published in 1549. After Mary I took the throne, Cranmer was tried for treason and heresy. He was imprisoned for two years and martyred in 1556 in Oxford. Cranmer wrote many important articles and letters, which—along with a few biographies on the life and influence of Cranmer—appear in the Thomas Cranmer Collection.

The Works of Thomas Cranmer, vol. 2: Miscellaneous Writings and Letters of Thomas Cranmer

  • Author: Thomas Cranmer
  • Editor: John Edmund Cox
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1846
  • Pages: 592

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Thomas Cranmer was perhaps the most important theological figure in the reformation of the English Church. His theological fingerprints are found everywhere in the 39 Articles and the Book of Common Prayer. This collection, compiled by the evangelical Parker Society, grants access to correspondence and writings that reveal the intentions and inner thoughts of the martyr and archbishop of Canterbury. This volume sheds light on the shifting nature of politics and theology in sixteenth-century England and the early Reformation.

Thomas Cranmer (1489–1556) was the archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. During his time as archbishop, Cranmer, along with Thomas Cromwell, championed the translation of the Bible into English. In 1548, plans for a complete liturgy for the English Church began. Cranmer compiled the Book of Common Prayer, which was published in 1549. After Mary I took the throne, Cranmer was tried for treason and heresy. He was imprisoned for two years and martyred in 1556 in Oxford. Cranmer wrote many important articles and letters, which—along with a few biographies on the life and influence of Cranmer—appear in the Thomas Cranmer Collection.

A Defence of the Sincere and True Translations of the Holy Scriptures into the English Tongue, against the Cavils of Gregory Martin

  • Author: William Fulke
  • Editor: Charles Henry Hartshorne
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1843
  • Pages: 607

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

One of the most significant and divisive issues in the English Reformation was Bible translation. This volume from the Parker Society presents Puritan minister William Fulke’s defense of an English Bible. Fulke rails against Catholic priest Gregory Martin’s attacks on English translations as dangerous and unreliable, advocating for the widespread distribution of a Bible in the people’s tongue. The volume includes a biographical sketch of the spirited Fulke, and is indicative of the groundswell of Reformed theology that carried the Church of England away from Rome.

William Fulke (1538–1589) was an English Puritan divine, and a leading figure in the vestments controversy over English church identity.

Stapleton’s Fortress Overthrown, A Rejoinder to Martiall’s Reply, and A Discovery of the Dangerous Rock of the Popish Church Commended by Sanders

  • Author: William Fulke
  • Editor: Richard Gibbings
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1848
  • Pages: 440

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume compiles three works by Puritan divine William Fulke. In Stapleton’s Fortress Overthrown, Fulke rails against the Catholic faith and its presence in England. In A Rejoinder, William Fulke joins James Calfhill in attacking John Martiall’s Treatise of the Cross, as Fulke decries the use of images of Christ in the crucifix. And lastly, A Discovery addresses the writings of English Catholic Nicholas Sanders, and criticizes the origin of the Catholic Church and its authority.

Fulke’s spirited writings represent some of the most colorful and radical writings of the English Reformation, shedding light on the evangelical fringes of the Reformation in England.

William Fulke (1538–1589) was an English Puritan divine, and a leading figure in the vestments controversy over English church identity.

The Remains of Edmund Grindal

  • Author: Edmund Grindal
  • Editor: William Nicholson
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1843
  • Pages: 516

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Edmund Grindal, archbishop of Canterbury under Elizabeth I from 1576–1583, was called by John Milton “a grave and pious man,” compared to the pretension of other Elizabethan bishops. He was admired by his fellow Puritans and attacked by high churchmen in later centuries. This collection gathers works from throughout the affable bishop’s career, including sermons, letters, and several official documents that shed light on the ever-shifting religious climate in England.

Edmund Grindal (1519–1583) was bishop of London, archbishop of York, and finally archbishop of Canterbury during Elizabeth I’s reign, though he very well may never have actually visited Canterbury.

The Early Writings of Bishop Hooper

  • Author: John Hooper
  • Editor: Samuel Carr
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1843
  • Pages: 584

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John Hooper was an uncompromising Reformed figure in the English Reformation, eventually martyred under the reign of Mary in 1555. This volume contains many of his early writings, including sermons and official declarations. They highlight his work in reforming Parish ministry in his diocese, holding ministers accountable for biblical literacy and teaching.

John Hooper (ca. 1495–1555) was bishop of Gloucester and Worcester. He was influential in the vestments controversy, only relenting from his critical view of the new Ordinal after weeks of imprisonment. He observed a vow of poverty, resigning the profits of his see to the crown, and was a strong proponent of social justice. Hooper also endeavored to spread Calvinist theology across England, and was burnt at the stake upon the reinstatement of heresy acts under Mary I. His writings greatly influenced the Puritans that would follow him in the reign of Elizabeth.

The Later Writings of Bishop Hooper, together with His Letters and Other Pieces

  • Author: John Hooper
  • Editor: Charles Nevinson
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1852
  • Pages: 640

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John Hooper was an uncompromising Reformed figure in the English Reformation, eventually martyred under the reign of Mary in 1555. This volume contains many of his later writings that influenced the Puritans that would come after him during Elizabeth’s reign. Influenced by the writings of Calvin, they reflect his unbending commitment to Reformation doctrines. Also included are his letters and other intimate pieces.

John Hooper (ca. 1495–1555) was bishop of Gloucester and Worcester. He was influential in the vestments controversy, only relenting from his critical view of the new Ordinal after weeks of imprisonment. He observed a vow of poverty, resigning the profits of his see to the crown, and was a strong proponent of social justice. Hooper also endeavored to spread a Calvinistic theology across England, and was burnt at the stake upon the reinstatement of heresy acts under Mary I. His writings greatly influenced the Puritans that would follow him in the reign of Elizabeth.

The Works of Roger Hutchinson

  • Author: Roger Hutchinson
  • Editor: John Bruce
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1842
  • Pages: 366

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Though little is known about Roger Hutchinson’s life, his works reflect the Reformed theological undercurrent of the English Reformation. This collection, compiled by the evangelical Anglican group the Parker Society, presents his layman’s work The Image of God, and five of his sermons. The Image of God considers how we are to think of God and where we are to draw information from him, advocating the personal reading of Scripture. His sermons deal with the Lord’s Supper and patience during oppression.

Roger Hutchinson was a sixteenth-century fellow of St. John’s College and Eton College, Cambridge.

The Works of John Jewel, vol. 1

  • Author: John Jewel
  • Editor: John Ayre
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1845
  • Pages: 552

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John Jewel was the foremost literary defender of the Reformed Church of England and its separation from the Catholic Church. This collection from the Parker Society collects Jewel’s numerous and extensive works responding to various critics, and defending the theological and political independence of the Church of England. Volume 1 contains Jewel’s letters to Dr. Cole, his critique of various Catholic institutions, and dialogue with M. Harding.

John Jewel (1522–1571) was an English bishop who sought to solidify the beliefs of the Church of England after the divisions caused by Henry VIII, Edward VI, and Mary I. In his sermons, he challenged the Catholic Church to defend its beliefs out of Scripture or the words of the Church Fathers. The ensuing debates led him to publish Apology of the Church of England, which presented a precise explanation of the stance of the Church of England against Catholicism and established him as the foremost literary apologist of his time.

The Works of John Jewel, vol. 2

  • Author: John Jewel
  • Editor: John Ayre
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1847
  • Pages: 587

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John Jewel was the foremost literary defender of the Reformed Church of England and its separation from the Catholic Church. This collection from the Parker Society collects Jewel’s numerous and extensive works responding to various critics, and defending the theological and political independence of the Church of England. Volume 2 contains Jewel and M. Harding’s dialogue, critiques of the Catholic Church, a treatise on the sacraments, and several sermons.

John Jewel (1522–1571) was an English bishop who sought to solidify the beliefs of the Church of England after the divisions caused by Henry VIII, Edward VI, and Mary I. In his sermons, he challenged the Catholic Church to defend its beliefs out of Scripture or the words of the Church Fathers. The ensuing debates led him to publish Apology of the Church of England, which presented a precise explanation of the stance of the Church of England against Catholicism and established him as the foremost literary apologist of his time.

The Works of John Jewel, vol. 3

  • Author: John Jewel
  • Editor: John Ayre
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1848
  • Pages: 626
  • Languages: English and Latin

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John Jewel was the foremost literary defender of the Reformed Church of England and its separation from the Catholic Church. This collection from the Parker Society collects Jewel’s numerous and extensive works responding to various critics, and defending the theological and political independence of the Church of England. Volume 3 includes Jewel’s Apologia Ecclesiae Anglicanae, An Apology or Answers in Defence of the Church of England, and A Defence of the Apology of the Church of England.

John Jewel (1522–1571) was an English bishop who sought to solidify the beliefs of the Church of England after the divisions caused by Henry VIII, Edward VI, and Mary I. In his sermons, he challenged the Catholic Church to defend its beliefs out of Scripture or the words of the Church Fathers. The ensuing debates led him to publish Apology of the Church of England, which presented a precise explanation of the stance of the Church of England against Catholicism and established him as the foremost literary apologist of his time.

The Works of John Jewel, vol. 4

  • Author: John Jewel
  • Editor: John Ayre
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1850
  • Pages: 733

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John Jewel was the foremost literary defender of the Reformed Church of England and its separation from the Catholic Church. This collection from the Parker Society collects Jewel’s numerous and extensive works responding to various critics, and defending the theological and political independence of the Church of England. Volume 4 contains Jewel’s personal correspondence and several brief miscellaneous works.

John Jewel (1522–1571) was an English bishop who sought to solidify the beliefs of the Church of England after the divisions caused by Henry VIII, Edward VI, and Mary I. In his sermons, he challenged the Catholic Church to defend its beliefs out of Scripture or the words of the Church Fathers. The ensuing debates led him to publish Apology of the Church of England, which presented a precise explanation of the stance of the Church of England against Catholicism and established him as the foremost literary apologist of his time.

Select Works of John Bale: Containing the Examinations of Lord Cobham, William Thorpe, and Anne Askewe, and the Image of Both Churches

  • Author: John Bale
  • Editor: Henry Christmas
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1849
  • Pages: 647

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John Bale was a quarrelsome bishop of Ossory who earned himself the nickname “bilious Bale.” This collection, compiled by the Parker Society, features Bale’s most significant theological works, including his commentary on Revelation, Image of Both Churches, in which he sees the Catholic Church’s persecution of “the true church” as the fulfillment of prophecy. Also included are Bale’s Examinations of Lord Cobbham, William Thorpe, and Anne Askewe.

John Bale (1495–1563) was an English Churchman, historian, and controversialist, and the bishop of Ossory. He was infamous for a disgruntled disposition and quarreling, which earned him the nickname, “bilious Bale.”

A Progress of Piety: Whose Jesses Lead into the Harbour of Heavenly Heart’s Ease

  • Author: John Norden
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1847
  • Pages: 189

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John Norden’s A Progress of Piety illustrates the more practical and devotional theology of Elizabeth’s reign. The work is a glimpse of the devotional life of a sixteenth-century evangelical layman. It includes several prayers, poems, and a brief biographical sketch of Norden.

John Norden (1547–1625) was an English cartographer and author of numerous devotional works. Keeping his two fields of publication very separate, he avoided religious persecution by claiming his devotional volumes were authored by a John Norden “pretender.”

A Catechism Written in Latin Together with the Same Catechism Translated into English

  • Authors: Alexander Nowell
  • Translator: Thomas Norton
  • Editor: George Elwes Corrie
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1853
  • Pages: 244
  • Languages: Latin and English

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Alexander Nowell was a staunch Calvinist Reformer. This volume, compiled by the evangelical Parker Society, contains both the original Latin, and English translation by Thomas Norton. Nowell’s catechism is a valuable representation of the English Reformation’s evangelical wings.

Alexander Nowell (1507–1602) was an Anglican Calvinist theologian. He served as Dean of St. Paul’s Church during Elizabeth I’s reign.

Correspondence of Matthew Parker: Comprising Letters Written by and to Him, from A.D. 1535, to His Death, A.D. 1575

  • Author: Matthew Parker
  • Editors: John Bruce and Thomas Thomason Perowne
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1853
  • Pages: 511
  • Languages: Latin and English

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Aside from Thomas Cranmer, Matthew Parker might have been the most significant theologian of the English Reformation. Compiled by the Parker Society, this collection of his correspondence grants access to the intentions and councils of this influential archbishop of Canterbury. The Parker Society also includes a timeline and biography that contextualizes each of the letters within the tumult of the English Reformation.

Matthew Parker (1504–1575) was archbishop of Canterbury from 1559–1575. He profoundly impacted early Anglican theology as one of the architects of the 39 Articles.

Examinations and Writings of John Philpot

  • Author: John Philpot
  • Editor: Robert Eden
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1842
  • Pages: 446

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Burnt at the stake in 1555, John Philpot was a fiery Reformer, constantly in conflict. His work is representative of the Reformation’s most expressive thinkers. This volume contains an assortment of his writings compiled by the Parker Society, including Disputation on the Convocation-House and an Apology for Spitting upon an Arian.

John Philpot (1516–1555) was archdeacon of Winchester. He was burnt at the stake under Mary I. Philpot was noted for his fiery, quarrelsome nature—even debating fellow prisoners who were Pelagians.

The Works of James Pilkington

  • Author: James Pilkington
  • Editor: James Scholefield
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1842
  • Pages: 703

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

James Pilkington was an influential English Reformer, contributing to the 39 Articles and the Book of Common Prayer. This collection of his works features his expositions on Haggai, Obadiah, and Nehemiah, as well as his Answers to Popish Questions and other miscellaneous letters and sermons. His work is representative of the deep conflict that accompanied religious discussion in England during the Reformation.

James Pilkington (1520–1576) was the first Protestant bishop of Durham, a post he held from 1561 until his death. Like many Protestant clergy, he was exiled during the reign of Mary I, but returned to England under Elizabeth and founded the Rivington Grammar School.

The Sermons of Edwin Sandys: To Which Are Added Some Miscellaneous Pieces by the Same Author

  • Author: Edwin Sandys
  • Editor: John Ayre
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1841
  • Pages: 467

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Edwin Sandys was an accomplished Protestant preacher, delivering a sermon to Jane Grey’s militant supporters at Cambridge during their attempt to keep Mary I off the throne. These selections of his preaching are rich with the doctrines of the Reformation. Compiled by the Parker Society, this volume also includes a biography of Sandys and other miscellaneous works from the bishop.

Edwin Sandys (1519–1588) was successively bishop of Worcester, London, and York under Elizabeth I.

A Disputation on Holy Scripture against the Papists, Especially Bellarmine and Stapleton

  • Author: William Whitaker
  • Editor: William Fitzgerald
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1849
  • Pages: 718

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

William Whitaker was one of the most intellectually brilliant minds of the English Reformation. His intelligent rebuffs of Catholic arguments offer an excellent look into the philosophy behind the English Reformation. This volume, presented by the Parker Society, present Whitaker’s arguments against two Catholic priests regarding the authority, interpretation, and reading of the Bible.

William Whitaker (1548–1595) was a prominent Reformed Anglican churchman and theologian. He was master of St. John’s College, Cambridge.

The Works of John Whitgift, vol. 1

  • Author: John Whitgift
  • Editor: John Ayre
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1851
  • Pages: 546

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John Whitgift, author of the Lambeth Articles, was the last Elizabethan archbishop of Canterbury. His writings reflect the religious climate of England as the doctrines of the Reformation took hold across the whole church and Puritans were increasingly persecuted. Volume 1 of his works covers the first six tractates in his ecclesiological conflict with Puritan Thomas Cartwright.

John Whitgift (1530–1604) was archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 until his death. He tutored Francis Bacon in classics at Cambridge, attended to Elizabeth I on her deathbed, and crowned James I.

The Works of John Whitgift, vol. 2

  • Author: John Whitgift
  • Editor: John Ayre
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1852
  • Pages: 595

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John Whitgift, author of the Lambeth Articles, was the last Elizabethan archbishop of Canterbury. His writings reflect the religious climate of England as the doctrines of the Reformation took hold across the whole church and Puritans were increasingly persecuted. Volume 2 of his works covers tractates 7–10 in his ecclesiological conflict with Puritan Thomas Cartwright.

John Whitgift (1530–1604) was archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 until his death. He tutored Francis Bacon in classics at Cambridge, attended to Elizabeth I on her deathbed, and crowned James I.

The Works of John Whitgift, vol. 3

  • Author: John Whitgift
  • Editor: John Ayre
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1853
  • Pages: 655

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John Whitgift, author of the Lambeth Articles, was the last Elizabethan archbishop of Canterbury. His writings reflect the religious climate of England as the doctrines of the Reformation took hold across the Church and Puritans were increasingly persecuted. Volume 3 of his works covers the final 3 tractates in his ecclesiological conflict with Puritan Thomas Cartwright, as well as selected sermons and letters compiled by the Parker Society.

John Whitgift (1530–1604) was archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 until his death. He tutored Francis Bacon in classics at Cambridge, attended to Elizabeth I on her deathbed, and crowned James I.

The Christian Manual: Of the Life and Manners of True Christians

  • Author: John Woolton
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1851
  • Pages: 156

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This edition of John Woolton’s The Christian Manual was reprinted by the Parker Society to demonstrate the application of Reformation principles “to the practical duties of individual and social life.” Woolton’s treatise on practical Christian living clearly reflects Calvinist influences as he exhorts Christians to, “declare to the world their faith by their deeds, their words by their works, and their profession by their conversation.”

John Woolton (1553–1593) was bishop of Exeter from 1578 until his death.

Liturgical Services: Liturgies and Occasional Forms of Prayer Set Forth in the Reign of Queen Elizabeth

  • Editor: William Keatinge Clay
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1847
  • Pages: 695

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Dig into the development of Anglican liturgy with this selection of Elizabethan resources reprinted by the Parker Society. This volume includes prayers and litanies that demonstrate the principles of the early English Reformation.

William Keatinge Clay (1797–1867) was an English cleric and a member of the Parker Society.

Select Poetry, Chiefly Devotional, of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth, vol. 1

  • Editor: Edward Farr
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1845
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This collection of poetry from the reign of Elizabeth illustrates the devotional character of the English Reformation. Reprinted by the Parker Society, volume 1 contains 137 biographical sketches that document the lives and poetical contributions of each author in the collection.

Edward Farr was a nineteenth-century English historian and a member of the evangelical Anglican group, the Parker Society.

Select Poetry, Chiefly Devotional, of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth, vol. 2

  • Editor: Edward Farr
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1845
  • Pages: 303

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This collection of poetry from the reign of Elizabeth illustrates the devotional character of the English Reformation. Volume 2 contains hundred of devotional poems from 137 authors—including Elizabeth herself—that express in verse the tumult and development of the Reformation in England.

Edward Farr was a nineteenth-century English historian and a member of the evangelical Anglican group, the Parker Society.

Private Prayers, Put Forth by Authority During the Reign of Queen Elizabeth

  • Editor: William Keatinge Clay
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1851
  • Pages: 584

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Examining the personal elements of the English Reformation, this volume presents four collections of prayers published under Elizabeth. They Include The Primer of 1559, The Orarium of 1560, The Preces Private of 1564, and The Book of Christian Prayers of 1578.

William Keatinge Clay (1797–1867) was an English cleric and a member of the Parker Society.

Christian Prayers and Holy Meditations, As Well for Private as Public Exercise

  • Editor: Henry Bull
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1842
  • Pages: 209

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Meeting the demand for updated private devotions based on the doctrines of the Reformation, this volume of prayers and meditations was collected and published by Henry Bull, a Protestant theologian and ally of John Foxe. They are a valuable glimpse into the spiritual pulse of the English people during Elizabeth’s reign.

Henry Bull (d. 1577) was an English Protestant theologian and ally of John Foxe, helping to document the life of Marian exiles.

The Zurich Letters: Comprising the Correspondence of Several English Bishops and Others, with Some of the Helvetian Reformers, vol. 1

  • Editor: Hastings Robinson
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1842
  • Pages: 198

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Upon Mary’s accession to the throne of England, hundreds of Protestant clergy fled to Europe, and a great number of those to Zurich. When they returned to England after the coronation of Elizabeth, these clergy maintained correspondence with their Swiss hosts. Collected here are nearly 300 letters between these English exiles and continental Reformers—including John Jewel, Henry Bullinger, Robert Horne, Peter Martyr, Edmund Grindal, and others. Volume 1 contains correspondence from 1558–1579.

Hastings Robinson was a nineteenth-century English historian and a member of the evangelical Anglican group, the Parker Society.

The Zurich Letters: Comprising the Correspondence of Several English Bishops and Others, with Some of the Helvetian Reformers, vol. 2

  • Editor: Hastings Robinson
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1842
  • Pages: 620

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Upon Mary’s accession to the throne of England, hundreds of Protestant clergy fled to Europe, and a great number of those to Zurich. When they returned to England after the coronation of Elizabeth, these clergy maintained correspondence with their Swiss hosts. Collected here are nearly 300 letters between these English exiles and continental Reformers—including John Jewel, Henry Bullinger, Robert Horne, Peter Martyr, Edmund Grindal, and others. Volume 2 contains correspondence from 1558–1602.

Hastings Robinson was a nineteenth-century English historian and a member of the evangelical Anglican group, the Parker Society.

A General Index to the Publications of the Parker Society

  • Editor: Henry Gough
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1850
  • Pages: 810

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This index to the Parker Society’s publication includes the final report of the society on their work and a massive index of people, places, objects, and topics covered in all 53 volumes of the Works of the Fathers and Early Writers of the Reformed English Church series.

Henry Gough was a nineteenth-century English lawyer and a member of the evangelical Anglican group, the Parker Society.